HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices
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HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices
HIPAA Compliance and HIPAA Risk management Articles, Tips and Updates for Medical Practices and Physicians
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HIPAA Police –Are They Coming For You?

HIPAA Police –Are They Coming For You? | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

As reported by Health and Human Services (HHS) HIPAA fines and audits are significantly on the rise. 5% of practices are being audited against the HITECH Act and Omnibus Rule. Are you compliant?

 

“How do all these regulations affect me as a Healthcare Covered Entity or Business Associate?”

To answer that question, let’s first look at what the regulations are and get a brief description. Once we read and understand what we are facing, the steps to complying with the rules should be attainable. I would love to say attaining compliance is easy, but with anything in life, if you want success you will have to work for it.

 

HITECH ACT

The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH Act) was created to motivate the implementation of electronic health records (EHR) and supporting technology in the United States. President Obama signed HITECH into law on February 17, 2009, as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA).

 

The HITECH act specified that by the beginning of 2011, healthcare providers would be given monetary incentives for being able to demonstrate Meaningful Use (MU) of electronic health records (EHR). These monetary incentives, up to $44,000 per doctor, will be offered until 2016, after which time penalties will be levied for failing to demonstrate such use.

 

FYI, the main failure that the centers for Medicare and Medicaid have discovered when auditing providers who have implemented an EHR system is their failure to perform a proper Risk Analysis.

 

OMNIBUS RULE

The United States Government’s requirement to implement Electronic Medical Records and Health IT compliance has prompted the US Government to adopt the long-awaited HIPAA Omnibus Rule http://compliancy-group.com/hipaa-omnibus-rule

The Omnibus Rule was finalized by the Office for Civil Rights (OCR). The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approved the final rule and subsequently published it in the Federal Register.

 

The rule effectively merges four separate rulemakings, which are as follows:

  • Amendments to HIPAA Privacy and Security rules requirements;
  • HIPAA and HIPAA HITECH under one rule now
  • Further requirements for data breach notifications and penalty enforcements
  • Approving the regulations in regards to the HITECH Act’s breach notification rule

 

It is apparent for this new rule that the health care industry will need to educate patients with regards to their privacy and disclosure rights. Patients will need to know how their information is used and disclosed, and how to submit complaints pertaining to privacy violations. Health Care providers should also try to better understand HIPAA requirements so that they are aware of their risks and responsibilities towards their patients.

 

In addition, the Omnibus Rule includes provisions that would govern the use of patient information in marketing; eliminates and modifies the “harm threshold” provision that presently allows healthcare providers to refrain from reporting data breaches that are deemed not harmful; ensures that business associates and subcontractors are liable for their own breaches and requires Business Associates to comply with HIPAA for the first time since HIPAA was first introduced. The rule also requires HIPAA privacy and security requirements to be employed by business associates and sub-contractors.

 

So, what does compliance with these rules look like? Is it a 3-ring binder on a shelf with some policies, is it an online training course, or is it my IT person telling me I am protected? Actually, it is a little of all three.

  1. RISK ANALYSIS– A true risk analysis covering Administrative, (Policies and Procedures), Technical, (How are your Network, Computers, Routers, protected), Physical, What safeguards have you put into place at your location? (Alarms, Shredding, Screen Protectors).
  2. RISK MANAGEMENT- The risk analysis is going to identify deficiencies. Risk Management is then put in place to track how your remediation plan will work to fix the deficiencies that were found during the Risk Analysis.
  3. VENDOR MANAGEMENT– Vendor Management tracks the companies and people that access your site where PHI or ePHI is stored and keeps track of who you share PHI or ePHI with. Depending on the relationship, you will want to have either a Business Associate Agreement (if they meet the requirements for being labeled a Business Associate) or a Confidentiality Agreement. Remember, for Business Associates, an agreement alone is not enough; you also need assurances that they are complying with the HIPAA Security Rule before you share or continue to share PHI or ePHI with them.
  4. DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT– It is hard to imagine compliance without a place to store policies, procedures, business associate agreements, or any other compliance documents. Why you ask? Because the rule specifically states that you must retain all compliance documents for a min of 6 years (depending on the state your business is in these rules may be more stringent).

5. TRAINING OF YOUR STAFF– One of the most important aspects of compliance is the tracking of not only HIPAA 101 training for your staff but also of your staff’s acknowledgment that they understand the HIPAA Privacy and Security Policies that you

 
 
Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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Staff Nurse Faces Jail Time for HIPAA Violations

Staff Nurse Faces Jail Time for HIPAA Violations | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Her breach of a patient's privacy jeopardized the clinic from which she was subsequently fired.

 

What began as routine file maintenance ended in arrest and possible jail time for a licensed practical nurse who shared a patient's medical information with her spouse.

 

Ms. A, 29, had been employed by a midsize regional clinic for five years. While she enjoyed her job and got on well with her supervisor, Dr. P, she was known to bemoan what she saw as low pay and the financial strain it created for herself and her husband. That strain intensified when her husband was in an auto accident and then sued by people in the other car seeking compensation for their injuries.

 

One day, as Ms. A was flipping through charts to straighten up the files, she saw the plaintiff's name. Reading the chart with great interest, she jotted some notes, stuck them in her bag, and replaced the file. That night, as her husband complained about the impending lawsuit and its potential financial consequences, Ms. A smiled and reached into her bag for the notes she'd taken earlier. “I think this will help,” she said.

 

The next day, Mr. A phoned the patient. During the conversation, he made it known that he had medical information which he believed weakened the man's case. Mr. A suggested that he consider dropping the lawsuit.

 

After hanging up with Mr. A, the patient made two phone calls. First he called the clinic where Ms. A worked. Then he called the district attorney.

 

The next morning, Ms. A was summarily fired. “You may very well have put this whole clinic in jeopardy,” Dr. P told her.

 

After Ms. A left the building, Dr. P called a meeting of all the nurses, physician assistants, and support staff and explained why Ms. A had been fired. Outlining the laws on patient privacy, he informed them that no breach of these laws would be tolerated under any circumstances.

 

Meanwhile, Ms. A's problems were just beginning. The district attorney forwarded the patient's complaint to a federal prosecutor, and within a month, both Ms. A and her husband were indicted. Ms. A was charged with violating the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and with “conspiracy to wrongfully disclose individual health information for personal gain with maliciously harmful intent in a personal dispute.” Her husband was charged with witness tampering. The couple hired a criminal defense attorney, who negotiated a plea agreement with the federal prosecutor. Ms. A pleaded guilty to one count of wrongful disclosure of individual health information for personal gain. In exchange for her plea, the charges against her husband were dismissed.

 

Ms. A is awaiting sentencing. She faces up to 10 years in prison, a fine of as much as $250,000, and up to three years of supervised probation. The state nursing board is seeking to revoke her license.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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Why should you care about HIPAA?

Why should you care about HIPAA? | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Why should you care about HIPAA?

Can you afford a $50,000 fine for a HIPAA violation? The healthcare industry is extremely vulnerable to cyber-attacks and data theft. According to the HIPAA enforcement rule, penalties can reach up to $1,500,000 per year per violation depending upon the type of HIPAA violation.

Look at some of the biggest HIPAA penalties enforced by the Office for Civil Rights:

In October 2018, Anthem Insurance pays OCR $16 Million in Record HIPAA Settlement after a series of cyberattacks led to the largest U.S. health data breach in history and exposed the electronically protected health information of almost 79 million people. OCR’s investigation revealed that Anthem failed to conduct an enterprise-wide risk analysis, had insufficient procedures to regularly review information system activity, failed to identify and respond to suspected or known security incidents, and failed to implement adequate minimum access controls to prevent the cyber-attackers from accessing sensitive ePHI, beginning as early as February 18, 2014.

 

A judge ruled in June 2018 that MD Anderson Cancer Center has to pay $4,348,000 in civil money penalties to OCR following an investigation of the theft of 3 unencrypted devices that resulted in a breach of ePHI (electronic Protected Health Information) of over 33,500 individuals.

 

Fresenius Medical Care North America (FMCNA) is paying 3.5 million dollars with a corrective action plan after 5 separate data breaches in 2012 because they failed to implement policies and procedures and to implement proper protection of PHI (Protected Health Information).

 

CardioNet has been fined 2.5 million with a corrective action plan after a laptop was stolen from an employee's vehicle. Further investigation revealed insufficient risk analysis and risk management at the company. Their policies and procedures were in draft status and had not been implemented.

 

One surprise inspection can expose a HIPAA violation and change your business forever.  New legislation now allows patients in Connecticut to sue healthcare providers for privacy violations or PHI disclosure as well.  You may say that your job as a healthcare provider is only to treat your patients, that you don't need to worry about Cybersecurity or technology. 

 

Bear in mind though - it is a fact that Cybersecurity issues can impact and have impacted patient care on several occasions! Protect the integrity of your business and your patients' private health information to avoid a HIPAA violation that could cost you money, respect, and patients!

 

You may understand that HIPAA violations can lead to fines, but you may also be wondering: What is a corrective action plan? Often, when the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) imposes a fine for a HIPAA violation, they also enforce a Corrective Action Plan with a strict timeline to correct underlying compliance problems and a goal to prevent breaches from recurring.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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