HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices
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HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices
HIPAA Compliance and HIPAA Risk management Articles, Tips and Updates for Medical Practices and Physicians
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Navigating Mobile Devices and HIPAA

Navigating Mobile Devices and HIPAA | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

The mobile technology revolution has impacted nearly every industry across the globe, with healthcare being no exception. Hospitals, clinics, and providers have all quickly embraced the use of smartphones and other mobile devices along with the convenience of accessing important medical information quickly.  

Many healthcare organizations are capitalizing on the benefits that mobile devices provide by permitting physicians, nurses, and other healthcare staff to bring their own personal devices (BYOD) to use at work. Other organizations choose to provide their staff with company-owned mobile devices, finding it easier to maintain control and protect their networks. 

 

Although the convenience of mobile technology provides many advantages, it also comes with risks. If mobile data security measures are inadequate, covered entities are at risk of violating HIPAA regulations that can incur heavy fines. HIPAA fines of up to $1.5 million per violation category, per year that the violation has been allowed to persist can be issued by the HHS. In addition, other federal agencies can issue fines, such as the state attorneys general. There is also the considerable cost of a breach response to cover if data is potentially exposed. 

 

The majority of mobile devices do not have robust security controls which can allow devices to be easily compromised. For example, if an unprotected device connects to a network via public Wi-Fi, there is an increased risk of theft. Cybercriminals view mobile devices as an accessible entry point into healthcare networks allowing them to access valuable electronic Protected Health Information.

 

As mobile devices are rapidly becoming an integral part of daily healthcare operations, it is important that organizations fully comprehend healthcare mobile security. (1) HIPAA covered entities that choose to use mobile devices in the workplace must implement controls to protect patient health data.  (2) It is also necessary they review and address all potential mobile data security risks.

 

The HIPAA Security Rule does not require specific technology solutions when it comes to technical safeguards for mobile devices. However, HHS does require organizations to implement reasonable and appropriate security measures for standard operating procedures. 

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HIPAA as an umbrella for county/municipal cybersecurity

HIPAA as an umbrella for county/municipal cybersecurity | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Are you a covered entity?

Basing a county/municipal information security (infosec) and cybersecurity framework on HIPAA is a logical choice, especially if you have one or more covered entities (CE) in your organization.

 

How do you know if you have or are a CE? If some department or division within your organization is a health care provider, a health plan or a health care clearinghouse, they are a CE. If you have clinics, doctors, psychologists, clinical social workers, chiropractors, nursing homes or pharmacies, you are a CE [i]. Moreover, many counties have divisions or departments that function as accountable care organizations (ACO), managed care organizations (MCO), health care clearinghouses or health maintenance organizations (HMO). These are all common functions, especially within large county governments.

Are you in compliance?

If anything described above applies to your county or municipal organization, one or more divisions of your organization is a CE and is required to be in compliance with both the HIPAA Security Rule and the HIPAA Privacy Rule.

 

In my experience, most county governments that have covered entities are out of compliance. Where does your organization stand?

 

I suspect what often happens is that executives look at something like information security policy requirements and say:

This has tech words in it. IT handles tech stuff. Therefore, I’ll turn it over to IT to handle.

 

What a huge mistake. An organizational policy dealing with the manner in which information is handled, regardless of whether or not HIPAA regulations apply, requires communication and coordination with legal, HR, IT, information security, risk management, archives, county clerks and other divisions within your organization. It’s not a tech issue; it’s a high-level, interdisciplinary executive function. It is an information governance (IG) issue, and it shouldn’t be handed off to your IT director or CIO to address unilaterally.'

Trust but verify

There are a number of reasons why IT should not be delegated sole responsibility for organizational information security. For one, a successful information security program requires checks, balances, and oversight. Trust but verify! A successful program also requires expert knowledge of departmental business processes that often exceeds the knowledge of the IT staff. Moreover, if your department heads have equivalent status within the organization, it is not appropriate for a CIO or IT director to unilaterally dictate policy to his or her colleagues of equal status. There are far too many IT departments that have adversarial relations with their end users because of their autocratic and often illogical decrees. Information security requires a team approach with executive and board oversight.

Extend HIPAA to your enterprise

If you have covered entities in your organization and have limited or nonexistent enterprise security policies, I would recommend that you consider building your entire enterprise information security policy on the HIPAA Security Rule in order to raise the entire organization up to that level while also getting compliant with federal law.

 

Why? It is highly probable that your organization uses shared facilities, shared IT infrastructure and shared services. Multiple information security levels create a significant management challenge and are certain to cause chaos and confusion. Multiple security stances will lead to security gaps and ultimately to breaches. Keep it simple and operate at the highest standard using generally accepted good practices.

Develop your policy with the HIPAA Security Rule

There are two major components to HIPAA, the Privacy Rule and the Security Rule. For the purpose of this discussion, only the Security Rule matters, but we’ll definitely discuss privacy another day.

The original HIPAA Security Rule document, 45 CFR Parts 160, 162 and 164 Health Insurance Reform: Security Standards; Final Rule, is 49 pages of small print. However, the meat of the document is contained within the final six pages and includes a handy matrix on page 48 (8380 of the federal register).

The security standards in HIPAA are broken down into three sections, each of which has multiple layers and subcomponents:

  • Administrative Safeguards (9 components)
  • Physical Safeguards (4 components)
  • Technical Safeguards (5 components)

 

These three major areas break down into at least 43 separate policy areas where your organization must build safeguards, including risk analysis, contingency planning, backup, passwords, HR sanctions and terminations, disaster recovery, encryption and many more.

 

Using the components in the matrix should enable you and your IG committee to quickly generate a suite of security policies and procedures that, when implemented and enforced, will vastly improve your current information security stance.

 

These are all policy areas that must be addressed as a matter of good practice whether or not you are a covered entity. This is why HIPAA is an excellent starting point for municipal governments that are infosec policy deficient.

Next Steps

1. Find out where your organization stands in terms of information security policies and procedures.

2. Find out whether or not you have covered entities in your organization. Must you comply with HIPAA? Are you compliant?

3. Meet with your IG committee to discuss your findings.

4. If you don’t have an IG committee — start one!

5. Download and review the HIPAA Security Rule. Use it to build your organization’s information security policies.

6. Use either the PDCA (Plan, Do, Check, Act) approach or the DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) approach to maintaining continuous improvement.

7. Begin building a culture of security in your organization.

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6 things software vendors need to know about HIPAA compliance

6 things software vendors need to know about HIPAA compliance | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Maintaining HIPAA compliance

 

Many people are loosely familiar with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and usually associate it with hospitals, clinics, and health insurance companies. However, it can be less clear how HIPAA compliance standards apply to countless other software vendors, SaaS providers that work with healthcare-related businesses or handle protected health information (PHI). In recent months, the Office for Civil Rights has been coming down hard on HIPAA violators, doling out some of the large fines – upwards of $5 million. So in order to ensure your business is protected and to maintain your brand reputation, it is vital to know the ins and outs of HIPAA compliance. With this in mind,

 

How do you know if you need to be HIPAA compliant?

 

In short, HIPAA rules apply to both Covered Entities (health insurance companies, HMOs, company health plans, etc.) and their business associates (a vendor or subcontractor who has access to PHI). What this means for business associates is that even if you’re a service provider or vendor who isn’t in the healthcare industry - like an all-flash storage company - you may still need to be HIPAA compliant indirectly due to the fact that your organization stores PHI. The first step here is to determine whether your organization handles PHI. If you do, your next step is to look through the

 

Look to your current vendors for guidance

 

Once you determine that you need to be compliant, there’s no need to go on a hiring spree to ensure you have the necessary resources in-house. Many of your existing vendors may already cover key HIPAA compliance requirements. Any good service provider should be able to tell you whether they are HIPAA compliant and what controls they can cover. If so, it is important that they are also willing to sign a Business Associate Agreement (BAA) - a negotiation between Covered Entities and any third-party vendors that have access to their PHI.

 

Look for specific types of technology that can help to streamline the process

 

If none of your existing vendors can help with HIPAA compliance, turn to a managed service provider to do the heavy lifting and help your business attain and maintain compliance, so you can focus resources on driving business. Additionally, they can strengthen the security technology, processes, and controls they use to keep customer information secure. For example, if you’re looking for a secure way to continue work-from-home programs at your organization through remote desktops, HIPAA compliant Desktop-as-a-Service (DaaS) vendors are a great option to both fill specific needs for your business and drastically simplify compliance.

 

Don’t forget about maintenance

 

A key stumbling block for many organizations tends to be maintaining a constantly evolving set of compliance standards. HIPAA compliance certification is valid only at that moment – it is then up to the company to maintain compliance which is easier said than done. Some important things to keep the top of mind for maintenance include 1) completing a HIPAA Risk Analysis document and audit at least once a year, and 2) assessing employees year-round to make sure they are doing their jobs in a HIPAA compliant manner, following all stated company policies and procedures.

 

Know who is responsible for HIPAA compliance

 

Another challenge accompanying HIPAA compliance may sound simple, but is one that oftentimes goes overlooked - precisely who internally is responsible for compliance? For non-healthcare organizations, a company is unlikely to have a designated in-house role such as a Privacy and Security Officer, and therefore the responsibility often falls on security or operations departments. However, it’s likely that neither of these departments has a full understanding or stake in HIPAA compliance. Regardless of who is taking the reins, it is important that the role is clearly demarcated and that person or department knows what is expected of them. Additionally, it’s critical that they work together with other departments as needed to ensure a well-rounded HIPAA strategy. Case in point - a recent

 

Keep HIPAA compliance top of mind for staff

 

Regardless of who is in charge, it is important that all your staff be mindful of maintaining HIPAA compliance. Human error can become one of the biggest obstacles to maintaining compliance, especially when employees may not even realize their company deals with PHI. For example, the same NueMD survey also found that only 58% of respondents were providing training for their staff annually. HR teams can proactively assist with this by reminding staff of regular HIPAA training, updates on compliance standards changes and keeping visible HIPAA compliance checklists posted in work areas.

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Our Partners at Compliancy Group Help Client Pass HIPAA Audit

Our Partners at Compliancy Group Help Client Pass HIPAA Audit | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Compliancy Group announced today that it has helped a long-time client pass a HIPAA audit. The Department of Health

and Human Services (HHS) Office for Civil Rights (OCR) investigation into a potential HIPAA violation resulted in no fine for a user of their web-based compliance solution, The Guard.

HIPAA audits target hundreds of healthcare professionals a year, according to the HHS Wall of Shame.

 

Compliance Group is the only HIPAA solution on the market today that gives clients access to a HIPAA Audit Response Program (ARP). The Compliance Group HIPAA Audit Response Program gives clients the ability to formulate all the necessary reports that OCR auditors are requesting in order to illustrate their compliance efforts. Compliance Group’s team of expert Compliance Coaches gather the reports and adhere to strict audit deadlines to ensure that clients stand their best chance at emerging from an audit without being fined.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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