HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices
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HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices
HIPAA Compliance and HIPAA Risk management Articles, Tips and Updates for Medical Practices and Physicians
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HIPAA Regulations for Radiologists 101

HIPAA Regulations for Radiologists 101 | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

HIPAA regulations are a complex set of rules and regulations that are designed to promote a more patient oriented medical system that enhances patient care. HIPAA regulations that promote the accessibility of medical records to patients and increase the security of electronic patient health information are also included in the HIPAA Omnibus Rule. Radiologists often receive patients through a referral system or send patient files to another medical doctor or facility after x-rays and other scans are interpreted. This constant sharing of sensitive patient information makes learning what are HIPAA regulations and how do they affect radiologists an important task for any radiologist.

 

HIPAA Omnibus Rule

The HIPAA Omnibus Rule has changed the way that patient information is collected, stored, transmitted and created in response to the HITECH Act. The HITECH Act offers organizations incentives for using electronic patient health information while improving the security of that data. When asking what are HIPAA regulations one of the most important things to consider is your organization’s privacy policy. New HIPAA regulations state that organizations and entities must update their privacy policies and business agreements to comply with the current standards.

 

Current HIPAA standards require that all businesses sharing patient information must be HIPAA compliant. For instance, if a radiologist receives referrals or bills insurance companies on behalf of clients, the insurance company and the organization referring clients should both be HIPAA compliant. Current business associate agreements will be allowed until late September of 2014, but after that date all business associates will need to comply with the HIPAA Security Rule to avoid penalties or fines.

 

What is Affected by HIPAA?

Nearly every aspect of creating, sharing and transmitting electronic patient health information has been affected by new HIPAA regulations. In addition to revising and updating your organization’s privacy policies and business agreements, you will also need to look at your internal records storage and the accessibility of patient records. For instance, your internal computer systems must be secure and protected from data loss or third-party access. Data encryption is required anytime that you transmit electronic patient information. If your organization is using a third-party storage system for patient health information, the company providing web-based storage services will also need to be HIPAA compliant.

 

One of the areas that will be most affected for radiologists is how patient information is disclosed. Since radiology is a field where referrals are very common, care must be taken to ensure formal, written consent is provided each time you share patient health information. For example, a radiologist sending the results of an x-ray to a general practitioner will need to have written consent by the patient to do so. In order to understand and comply with current HIPAA regulations, it is best to use a HIPAA compliance checklist and HIPAA compliance software. HIPAA compliance software will walk you through the process of meeting current HIPAA regulations and help you avoid the confusion of updating and revising your current policies and practices on your own.
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Why Ignoring the Minimum Necessary Standard in HIPAA Could Cost You

Why Ignoring the Minimum Necessary Standard in HIPAA Could Cost You | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Does your healthcare organization develop and implement policies and procedures that are appropriate and reflect your organization’s business practices?

Under the HIPAA Minimum Necessary Standard, all covered entities must have policies and procedures that identify who needs access to Protected Health Information (PHI) to perform their job duties, the categories of PHI required, and the conditions where access is justified.

 

For instance, as a hospital, you can allow doctors, surgeons, or others to access a patient’s medical records if they’re involved in the treatment of that patient. If the entire medical history is required, your organization’s policies and procedures must explicitly state so and include a justified reason.

 

As a provider, you also need to take reasonable steps to make sure that no PHI is accidentally available for access. For example, if you’ll be hosting a meeting in your office, then you must ensure that no one from the meeting can access PHI documents accidentally.

How Does The Minimum  Necessary Requirement Work?

As the name implies, under the HIPAA Minimum Necessary Standard, it’s mandatory for covered entities to take reasonable measures to limit the use or disclosure of PHI and requests for PHI, to the minimum necessary needed to achieve the intended goal.

However, it’s important to note that the minimum necessary standard does not apply to:

  • Requests for disclosure by a healthcare provider for treatment purposes  
  • Disclosing information to the patient in question   
  • Uses or disclosures after a patient’s authorization  
  • Uses or disclosures needed to comply with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Administrative Simplification Rules  
  • Disclosing PHI to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under the Privacy Rule for reasons of enforcement  
  • Disclosing PHI for use under other laws

The Minimum Necessary Standard of the HIPAA Privacy Rule requires that your covered entity develops and implements policies and procedures that are appropriate for your organization and that reflect your business’ practices and workforce. Only those who need access to PHI should receive access, and even then, the PHI should be restricted to the minimum necessary information needed to perform the job.

Why Does It Matter?

Did you know the healthcare industry is one of the most vulnerable sectors when it comes to cyber-attacks and data theft? If your organization fails to meet the minimum necessary standard, you could face fines of $50,000 or more.     

 

In fact, penalties for HIPAA violations can reach $1,500,000 annually per violation based on the type of breach.  

The largest American health data breach to ever occur took place in January 2015. It exposed the electronic PHI of nearly 79 million people and resulted in Anthem Insurance paying OCR $16 Million!  

The investigation found that Anthem did not perform

enterprise-wide risk analysis and the organization’s procedures did not regularly review information system activity. Anthem also failed to identify and respond to security incidents, and they did not implement proper minimum access controls to prevent the risk of cyber-attacks from stealing sensitive ePHI.

 

Complying with HIPAA’s minimum necessary standard matters if you want to avoid the risk of an expensive fine.

How Can You Comply?

Under HIPAA’s minimum necessary standard, the terms ‘reasonable’ and ‘necessary’ are open to interpretation and left up to the judgment of the covered entity. It’s up to your organization to determine what information should be disclosed and what information needs restricted access.

 

However, to make sure that you’re complying with this requirement, there are some basic steps you should follow:

  1. Prepare a list of all systems that contain PHI and what types of PHI they include.
  2. Establish role-based permissions that restrict access to certain kinds of PHI. All information systems should limit access to certain types of information. For instance, you can limit access to health insurance numbers, Social Security numbers, and medical histories if it’s not necessary for everyone to see that PHI.
  3. Design and implement a policy for sanctions if violations of the minimum necessary standard occur.
  4. Provide proper employee training about the types of information they’re permitted to access and what information is off limits. Be clear about the consequences of obtaining information when not authorized.
  5. Create alerts when possible that notify the compliance team if there’s an unauthorized attempt to access PHI.
  6. Ensure that the minimum necessary rule is being applied to all information shared externally, with third parties and subcontractors. It’s mandatory for covered entities to limit how much PHI is disclosed based on the job duties and the nature of the third party’s business.
  7. Perform annual reviews and periodic audits of permissions and review logs to determine if anyone has knowingly or unknowingly accessed restricted information. Such reviews may also be required when a major incident takes place, such as the treatment of a celebrity in your organization, or if a shooting or newsworthy accident takes place and your organization is involved.
  8. Document all actions taken to address cases of unauthorized access or accessing more information than is necessary and the sanctions that took place as a result.

Adhering to the HIPAA Minimum Necessary Standard is important to protect your organization and your patient relationships. When you take the appropriate steps to comply with HIPAA, you’ll not only have a much better chance of avoiding the risk of a costly data breach, but you’ll also build trust with your patients.

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Why should you care about HIPAA?

Why should you care about HIPAA? | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Why should you care about HIPAA?

Can you afford a $50,000 fine for a HIPAA violation? The healthcare industry is extremely vulnerable to cyber-attacks and data theft. According to the HIPAA enforcement rule, penalties can reach up to $1,500,000 per year per violation depending upon the type of HIPAA violation.

Look at some of the biggest HIPAA penalties enforced by the Office for Civil Rights:

In October 2018, Anthem Insurance pays OCR $16 Million in Record HIPAA Settlement after a series of cyberattacks led to the largest U.S. health data breach in history and exposed the electronically protected health information of almost 79 million people. OCR’s investigation revealed that Anthem failed to conduct an enterprise-wide risk analysis, had insufficient procedures to regularly review information system activity, failed to identify and respond to suspected or known security incidents, and failed to implement adequate minimum access controls to prevent the cyber-attackers from accessing sensitive ePHI, beginning as early as February 18, 2014.

 

A judge ruled in June 2018 that MD Anderson Cancer Center has to pay $4,348,000 in civil money penalties to OCR following an investigation of the theft of 3 unencrypted devices that resulted in a breach of ePHI (electronic Protected Health Information) of over 33,500 individuals.

 

Fresenius Medical Care North America (FMCNA) is paying 3.5 million dollars with a corrective action plan after 5 separate data breaches in 2012 because they failed to implement policies and procedures and to implement proper protection of PHI (Protected Health Information).

 

CardioNet has been fined 2.5 million with a corrective action plan after a laptop was stolen from an employee's vehicle. Further investigation revealed insufficient risk analysis and risk management at the company. Their policies and procedures were in draft status and had not been implemented.

 

One surprise inspection can expose a HIPAA violation and change your business forever.  New legislation now allows patients in Connecticut to sue healthcare providers for privacy violations or PHI disclosure as well.  You may say that your job as a healthcare provider is only to treat your patients, that you don't need to worry about Cybersecurity or technology. 

 

Bear in mind though - it is a fact that Cybersecurity issues can impact and have impacted patient care on several occasions! Protect the integrity of your business and your patients' private health information to avoid a HIPAA violation that could cost you money, respect, and patients!

 

You may understand that HIPAA violations can lead to fines, but you may also be wondering: What is a corrective action plan? Often, when the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) imposes a fine for a HIPAA violation, they also enforce a Corrective Action Plan with a strict timeline to correct underlying compliance problems and a goal to prevent breaches from recurring.

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HIPAA compliance tips for small medical practices

HIPAA compliance tips for small medical practices | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

But data breaches don’t just affect large corporate entities, they affect small healthcare organizations as well. Take the case of Holland Eye Laser Surgery in March 2018. Their five-provider group practice saw a data breach which made available the patient records of 42,000 patients. Hackers were able to access Social Security numbers, birth records, and other sensitive protected health information (PHI).

 

In fact, some of the medical records of these patients were sold off by data hackers. Officials from the practice stated that they’re now working to strengthening their security system. But once patient trust is lost, sometimes it just cannot be restored.

 

Brief primer on HIPAA and data breaches

• The Privacy Rule protects individually identifiable health information held or transmitted by a covered entity or its business associate, in any form, whether electronic, paper, or verbal

• Each entity must analyze the risks to e-PHI in its environment and create solutions appropriate for its own situation.

• The HIPAA Breach Notification Rule requires providers to notify affected individuals, HHS, and in some cases, the media of a breach of unsecured PHI. Most notifications must be provided without delay and no later than 60 days following the discovery of a breach.

 

5 tips to help you and your medical staff to avoid data breaches

1. CMS requires organizations to “[i]mplement policies and procedures to prevent, detect, contain, and correct security violations.” (45 C.F.R. § 164.308(a)(1).) Conduct a detailed risk analysis to evaluate the current staff and product deficiencies and create corrective measures.

2. Designate a staff member to train employees on your practice’s HIPAA policies and procedures and spend time going over typical breaches.

3. Hire an outside expert to help your organization with compliance support. Your outside organization should set up monthly meetings with the business owners to evaluate your company compliance program and work with your organization to identify cost-effective resources to keep your company compliant.

4. Customize your internet toolbars with anti-phishing protection. These applications can run website checks and compare them to lists of known phishing sites and alert users.

5. Be suspicious of any email message that asks you to enter or verify personal information through a website or by replying to the message itself.  Practice groups and or staff members should never reply to or click the links in such a messages.

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Is it Time for Your Organization to Hit the HIPAA Breach Panic Button? 

Is it Time for Your Organization to Hit the HIPAA Breach Panic Button?  | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Indeed, it is. According to the latest statics from the HHS Office of Civil Rights (OCR), 43% of all reported breaches are now caused by hacking or other related information network discrepancies—not to mention those breaches that are the result of impermissible disclosures made by members of the work force.

 

Let’s face it, breaches will happen, especially those related to information systems. When it comes to breaches, most network security experts say it is “when” and not “if.” Regardless of whether the breach is related to the network or some other means such as lost or stolen devices containing ePHI, what is important is having a process in place to deal with it. This includes the ability to conduct an internal investigation to determine the basics such as how the breach was caused, the type of breach, and how many individuals were affected.

 

The HIPAA Breach Notification Rule states that a breach is, generally, an impermissible use or disclosure under the Privacy Rule that compromises the security or privacy of the protected health information. The exception is when the covered entity or business associate, as applicable, demonstrates that there is a low probability that the protected health information has been compromised based on a risk assessment of at least the following factors:

  1. The nature and extent of the protected health information involved, including the types of identifiers and the likelihood of re-identification;
  2. The unauthorized person who used the protected health information or to whom the disclosure was made;
  3. Whether the protected health information was actually acquired or viewed; and
  4. The extent to which the risk to the protected health information has been mitigated.

 

So, what is the best way to conduct the breach risk assessment to determine this probability? Start with some type of Breach Notification Risk Assessment Tool which is a decision tree-based process. This will help determine if the breach is reportable. Even if the determination is made that the breach is not reportable, documentation that this assessment was conducted must be maintained.

 

Having a comprehensive breach notification policy is critical. This will save a lot of headaches and layout a process to follow during the period of uncertainty associated with a breach. The policy should state the obvious such as who needs to be notified internally within the organization, who is responsible for conducting the assessment, and what specific notifications need to be made. What is even more important is the actual procedure to implement the policy. Procedures should cover how to undertake the investigation of the breach to cover the who, what, how, and when of the occurrence. If it is a reportable breach, this type of information is required for submitting “Notice of a Breach” to the Secretary of HHS (which technically is delegated to OCR.) When submitting the Notice, one should be prepared to answer a number of questions. This is why it is important that the internal investigation uncover as much information as possible.

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Hospitals Fail at HIPAA Compliance Re Medical Records Requests

Hospitals Fail at HIPAA Compliance Re Medical Records Requests | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Many hospitals failed at HIPAA compliance in response to simulated patients’ requests for medical records, according to a study by Yale researchers published in the JAMA Network Open.

 

The researchers surveyed 83 top-ranked US hospitals with independent medical records request processes and medical records departments reachable by telephone.

 

According to HIPAA, patient requests for medical record must be fulfilled within 30 days of receipt in the format requested by the patient if the records are readily producible in that format. OCR guidance says that hospitals can charge a cost-based fee to provide those records.

 

The researchers conducted scripted interviews with medical records departments in a simulated patient experience and also collected medical records release authorization forms. There was wide variation in the information provided on the authorization forms and from the telephone calls in terms of what data could be requested, release formats, costs, and processing times.

 

On the authorization forms, only 44 hospitals (53%) provided patients the option to acquire the entire medical record. On telephone calls, all 83 hospitals stated that they were able to release entire medical records to patients.

 

There were discrepancies in information given in telephone calls versus authorization forms among the formats hospitals said that they could use to release information: 69 versus 40 for pick up in person, 20 versus 14 for fax, 39 versus 27 for email, 55 versus 35 for CD, and 21 versus 33 for online patient portals. These results demonstrated noncompliance with HIPAA in refusing to provide records in the format requested by the patient, the study noted.

 

There were 48 hospitals that had costs of release above the federal recommendation of $6.50 for electronically maintained records. In one case, a hospital charged $541.50 for a 200-page medical record. At least seven of the hospitals were noncompliant with state requirements for processing times.

 

“Discrepancies in information provided to patients regarding medical records request processes and noncompliance with regulations appear to indicate the need for stricter enforcement of policies relating to patients’ access to their protected health information,” the researchers concluded.

 

The study is timely because the Trump administration has launched the MyHealthEData initiative, which is designed to improve EHR patient data access and use. MyHealthEData is intended to break down the barriers that prevent patients from having electronic access and control over their own health records from the device or application of their choice.

 

In 2017, President Donald Trump issued an executive order in which he directed government agencies to “improve access to and the quality of information that Americans need to make informed healthcare decisions, including data about healthcare prices and outcomes, while minimizing reporting burdens on affected plans, providers, or payers.” The order was part of a broader effort to increase market competition in the healthcare market.

 

“The MyHealthEData initiative will work to make clear that patients deserve to not only electronically receive a copy of their entire health record, but also be able to share their data with whomever they want, making the patient the center of the healthcare system. Patients can use their information to actively seek out providers and services that meet their unique healthcare needs, have a better understanding of their overall health, prevent disease, and make more informed decisions about their care,” explained a March 2018 CMS press release.

 

While the goals of MyHealthEData are lofty, the results of this Yale study call into question the ability of private healthcare organizations to fulfill the Trump administration’s initiative, never mind comply with existing HIPAA patient access requirements.

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HIPAA Compliant Technology and the Importance of Encryption

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) sets the standard for protecting sensitive patient data. This means that any covered entity (CE) or business associate (BA) that deals with protected health information (PHI) must ensure that all the required physical, network, and process security measures are in place and followed. The HIPAA Privacy Rule addresses the storage, accessing and sharing of PHI, whereas the HIPAA Security Rule outlines the security standards which protect health data created, received, maintained or transmitted electronically; known as electronic protected health information (ePHI).

The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act was passed as a supplemental act in 2009, and was formed in response to the improvements and increase in health technology development, and the increased use of ePHI.  Transmission Security is required of HIPAA compliant hosts to protect against unauthorized public access of ePHI; however, both authentication and encryption are stated to be addressable, rather than required. This concerns all methods of transmitting data, whether it be email, Internet, or even over a private network, such as a private cloud.

Confusion around some of the items classified as addressable within these technical standards, especially around encryption, increases the risk of fines for organizations that choose not to address these standards. Fines are very likely to be handed to organizations should they experience a data breach as a result of not using encryption, even if a risk assessment is in place. Encryption is expected to be one of the key areas OCR focus on when conducting phase 2 HIPAA audits later this year.

Using Technology to Comply with HIPAA

Mechanisms exist to meet the requirements of the HIPAA safeguards, starting with use of a HIPAA compliant network hosting provider.  HIPAA compliant networks must have robust firewalls in place to protect an organization’s network from hackers or data thieves. Secure platforms are required for all organizations that transmit ePHI. These platforms should deploy encryption when transmitting ePHI, and have administrative controls to safeguard the integrity of ePHI. These platforms should also have the capacity to retract messages in the event of a breach risk and be able to remotely remove a mobile device from the system if it is lost by its owner, stolen or otherwise disposed of. In addition to this, all devices used to store or transmit ePHI, such as laptops and mobile devices, should be password protected and encrypted.

The Ramifications of Failing to Encrypt

Since 2012, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has issued large monetary fines for violations of the HIPAA Privacy Rule following the introduction of HITECH. Some of its biggest fines have been due to lost or stolen laptops which were unencrypted.  In April 2014, Concentra Health Services were fined $1,725,220 to settle HIPAA Privacy violations which occurred after an unencrypted laptop was stolen from one its offices.  Some organizations may wrongly conclude that encryption is technically not required in all cases under the HIPAA Security Rule, as it is an “addressable” standard under HIPAA, meaning that it is required only where reasonable and appropriate based on a risk assessment.  However, these fines raise the question of how encryption of mobile devices containing ePHI is viewed. It is clear from the Concentra Health Service settlement that conducting risk assessments is not enough to avoid penalties under HIPAA. Rather, the risks identified in the assessment must be addressed completely and consistently.  Using encryption of ePHI during transmission is another important consideration organizations need to assess when completing risk assessments. When transmitting data between devices, it is crucial that organizations select a vendor that is HIPAA compliant – without doing so, there is potential to expose organizations to enormous risk of data breaches.


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HIPAA needs a makeover | mHealthNews

HIPAA needs a makeover | mHealthNews | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

The pace of mHealth innovation shows no signs of slowing down. New technologies are not only improving the lives of patients, but also empowering clinicians. However, healthcare is a highly regulated space dominated by major vendors, and it is vital that the regulatory environment keep up with the changing world. Specifically, it’s time for the Department of Health and Human Services to take a fresh look at the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) to ensure it better fits today’s mobile world.

Current HIPAA guidelines – while critical – need to be revised to support smaller companies that can transform the space. Leading app developers across the industry are working together to seek clearer guidelines that will encourage innovation. The App Association recently joined with AirStrip, CareSync and other mHealth companies urging government representatives to look at this issue so we can better align our practices with theirs and together work towards the goal of improved patient care.

We recommend:

1. Make existing regulation more accessible for tech companies

Information on HIPAA is still mired in a Washington, D.C. mindset that revolves around reading the Federal Register or hiring expert consultants to "explain" what should be clear in the regulation itself. Not surprisingly, app makers do not find the Federal Register to be an effective resource when developing health apps.

Additionally, there are limited user-friendly resources available for app developers, who are mostly solo inventors or small groups of designers, not large companies with the resources to easily hire counsel or consultants who can help through the regulatory process.

Proposed solution: HHS must provide HIPAA information in a manner that is accessible and useful to the community who needs it. The agency should draft new FAQs that directly address mobile developer concerns.

2. Improve and update guidance from OCR on acceptable implementations

The current technical safeguards documentation available on the hhs.gov website is significantly out of date. Without new documentation that speaks to more modern uses, it will be difficult for developers to understand how to implement HIPAA in an effective way for patients.

Proposed solution: HHS and the OCR must update the "Security Rule Guidance Material" and provide better guidance regarding mobile implementations and standards – or examples of standard implementations that would not trigger an enforcement action – instead of leaving app makers to learn about these through an audit.

3. Improve outreach to new entrants in the healthcare space

Some of the most innovative new products in the mobile health space are coming from companies outside the traditional healthcare marketplace. Yet HHS appears attached to ‘traditional’ healthcare communities.

Proposed solution: In order to ensure the expansion of innovative new technologies, it is essential that HHS, the OCR and others expand their outreach to the communities that are driving innovation.

These issues are critical to the mobile health economy. By working more closely together, we can create a regulatory environment that encourages innovation in this life-changing marketplace.


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HIPAA Police –Are They Coming For You?

HIPAA Police –Are They Coming For You? | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

As reported by Health and Human Services (HHS) HIPAA fines and audits are significantly on the rise. 5% of practices are being audited against the HITECH Act and Omnibus Rule. Are you compliant?

 

“How do all these regulations affect me as a Healthcare Covered Entity or Business Associate?”

To answer that question, let’s first look at what the regulations are and get a brief description. Once we read and understand what we are facing, the steps to complying with the rules should be attainable. I would love to say attaining compliance is easy, but with anything in life, if you want success you will have to work for it.

 

HITECH ACT

The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH Act) was created to motivate the implementation of electronic health records (EHR) and supporting technology in the United States. President Obama signed HITECH into law on February 17, 2009, as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA).

 

The HITECH act specified that by the beginning of 2011, healthcare providers would be given monetary incentives for being able to demonstrate Meaningful Use (MU) of electronic health records (EHR). These monetary incentives, up to $44,000 per doctor, will be offered until 2016, after which time penalties will be levied for failing to demonstrate such use.

 

FYI, the main failure that the centers for Medicare and Medicaid have discovered when auditing providers who have implemented an EHR system is their failure to perform a proper Risk Analysis.

 

OMNIBUS RULE

The United States Government’s requirement to implement Electronic Medical Records and Health IT compliance has prompted the US Government to adopt the long-awaited HIPAA Omnibus Rule http://compliancy-group.com/hipaa-omnibus-rule

The Omnibus Rule was finalized by the Office for Civil Rights (OCR). The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approved the final rule and subsequently published it in the Federal Register.

 

The rule effectively merges four separate rulemakings, which are as follows:

  • Amendments to HIPAA Privacy and Security rules requirements;
  • HIPAA and HIPAA HITECH under one rule now
  • Further requirements for data breach notifications and penalty enforcements
  • Approving the regulations in regards to the HITECH Act’s breach notification rule

 

It is apparent for this new rule that the health care industry will need to educate patients with regards to their privacy and disclosure rights. Patients will need to know how their information is used and disclosed, and how to submit complaints pertaining to privacy violations. Health Care providers should also try to better understand HIPAA requirements so that they are aware of their risks and responsibilities towards their patients.

 

In addition, the Omnibus Rule includes provisions that would govern the use of patient information in marketing; eliminates and modifies the “harm threshold” provision that presently allows healthcare providers to refrain from reporting data breaches that are deemed not harmful; ensures that business associates and subcontractors are liable for their own breaches and requires Business Associates to comply with HIPAA for the first time since HIPAA was first introduced. The rule also requires HIPAA privacy and security requirements to be employed by business associates and sub-contractors.

 

So, what does compliance with these rules look like? Is it a 3-ring binder on a shelf with some policies, is it an online training course, or is it my IT person telling me I am protected? Actually, it is a little of all three.

  1. RISK ANALYSIS– A true risk analysis covering Administrative, (Policies and Procedures), Technical, (How are your Network, Computers, Routers, protected), Physical, What safeguards have you put into place at your location? (Alarms, Shredding, Screen Protectors).
  2. RISK MANAGEMENT- The risk analysis is going to identify deficiencies. Risk Management is then put in place to track how your remediation plan will work to fix the deficiencies that were found during the Risk Analysis.
  3. VENDOR MANAGEMENT– Vendor Management tracks the companies and people that access your site where PHI or ePHI is stored and keeps track of who you share PHI or ePHI with. Depending on the relationship, you will want to have either a Business Associate Agreement (if they meet the requirements for being labeled a Business Associate) or a Confidentiality Agreement. Remember, for Business Associates, an agreement alone is not enough; you also need assurances that they are complying with the HIPAA Security Rule before you share or continue to share PHI or ePHI with them.
  4. DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT– It is hard to imagine compliance without a place to store policies, procedures, business associate agreements, or any other compliance documents. Why you ask? Because the rule specifically states that you must retain all compliance documents for a min of 6 years (depending on the state your business is in these rules may be more stringent).

5. TRAINING OF YOUR STAFF– One of the most important aspects of compliance is the tracking of not only HIPAA 101 training for your staff but also of your staff’s acknowledgment that they understand the HIPAA Privacy and Security Policies that you

 
 
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The Benefits of Performing a HIPAA Risk Assessment

The Benefits of Performing a HIPAA Risk Assessment | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Security Rule mandates that covered entities must conduct a risk assessment of their healthcare company.

 

 A wide range of organizations – from healthcare insurance providers to hospitals – fall into this covered entity group. While it may seem taxing and time-consuming to provide standardized training to your employees, there are many reasons doing so can behoove you. For one, it’s the law. Since 2009, Security Risk Assessments (SRAs) have been a required annual practice set forth by the HIPAA Security Rule.

 

Don’t wait to become a breach headline; nip breaches in bud by detecting security issues before they wreak havoc. You can’t be secure if you are not compliant; and a HIPAA Risk Assessment will safeguard your organization in more ways than one. Technology is a timesaver that has simplified the medical filing and billing processes, but it leaves the potential for leaks and hacking.

 

A risk analysis will identify and document potential threats and liabilities that can cause a breach of sensitive data. An IT security consulting company can check all portable media (laptops), desktops, and networks to ensure they’re ironclad. IT security measures, such as encryption and two-factor authentication2, will be addressed in order to make it challenging for unwanted eyes to get a glimpse of patient information.  

 

Employees are the greatest threat to HIPAA compliance, so it’s important to make sure they’re well informed on how to prevent breaches. Annual HIPAA Security Awareness Training Programs provide a thorough understanding of each person’s role in preventing breaches and protecting physical and electronic information.

 

HIPAA training is a regulatory requirement, many employee actions that go awry could easily be prevented. A consultant will offer tips and tricks for minimizing that risk; a few include never leaving work phones and laptops unattended, never sharing passwords or company credentials, choosing to shred files as opposed to trashing them, and overcoming the temptation to “snoop” on patient information without just cause.

 

While many of these suggestions seem like common sense, there are also many lesser known incidences that arise while working in the medical field. Did you know that you cannot access your own medical records using your login credentials? While it may seem innocent enough, everyone is required to submit a request to access medical materials. 

 

Don’t deter a Risk Assessment out of indolence. HIPAA Risk Assessments must be accurate and extremely thorough.  Questions about all the administrative, technical, and physical safeguards an organization has in place must be asked about.

 

If outsourcing your HIPAA Risk Assessment, choose a company that provides comprehensive training courses. No two companies are alike so cookie-cutter answers don’t exist for compliancy; a client-facing doctor’s office and corporate health insurance agency will require that different preventive measures be put into place.

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HIPAA Training is not HIPAA Compliance

HIPAA Training is not HIPAA Compliance | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

We hear from so many doctors’ and dentists’ offices that they are “HIPAA-compliant” because they have completed the required annual HIPAA training for their staff.   FALSE! HIPAA Training is not HIPAA Compliance. HIPAA Training is only one of the components of HIPAA Compliance – thinking otherwise could lead to a false sense of security.

 

HIPAA law consists of various requirements in the areas of security and privacy, use and disclosure of PHI (protected health information) and in breach notification rules.

Minimum steps needed for HIPAA Compliance:

At the very minimum, a doctor’s or dentist’s office must do the following for HIPAA Compliance:

  1. Exercise privacy in the office everywhere.   Be careful about accidental disclosure of patient information.
  2. Display the Notice of Privacy Practices prominently in your office lobby and on your website.
  3. Exercise caution in the use and disclosure of PHI (Protected Health Information).     Patients have the right to review and obtain their PHI.   The onus falls on the medical practice to secure and protect PHI from unauthorized disclosure of any kind.
  4. Conduct the mandatory annual risk assessment, or hire an expert to conduct it for you.   The assessor must take into consideration all the security and privacy-related criteria while conducting the assessment, including all your administrative, physical and technical safeguards.   A detailed list of recommendations and action items should follow as a result of the risk assessment.
  5. Prepare and follow security and privacy policies and procedures.   Your risk assessment should highlight the minimum required policies and procedures that you would need to prepare or obtain.   Physicians and staff members should be familiar with and should follow these policies and procedures on a daily basis.
  6. Provide annual HIPAA Training to your staff and physicians.

Breach notification:

Breaches have unfortunately become only too common these days in an environment where medical records are extremely valuable in the black market.   HIPAA law also specifies strict breach notification requirements in the event of a breach.   The Office of Civil Rights (OCR) of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) requires the practice to inform all individuals whose data might have been lost or stolen.  

 

A breach of more than 500 records is considered a reportable breach, that is, the practice must notify HHS.   This could result in an audit of the practice by federal agencies, and the first thing they are going to ask you for is a copy of your last annual risk assessment.

Small practices may be targets of breaches too:

Many small practices think that they are too small to be targeted.   False again!   If you look at the HHS "Wall of Shame" which lists reported breaches of more than 500 patient records, you will see several small practices listed there who have undergone breaches.   The reality is that smaller practices are likely to be even more affected by a breach considering the high expenses and workload that follow.    The Ponemon Institute has calculated the average healthcare data breach cost to be $380 per record - for 500 records, that comes to approximately $190,000, which can be highly damaging for a small healthcare practice.

 

We often hear from dentists that they do not believe they need to comply.   Also False!  In fact, just recently, on January 2018, Steven Yang, DDS of California and Zachary Adkins, DDS of New Mexico had breaches of 3000+ patient records each due to the theft of a laptop and other portable electronic devices respectively.   

 

Robert Smith, DMD of Tennessee reported 1500 records breached after a hack.  Several other providers such as physicians, hospitals, pharmacies, health plans, and business associates have experienced breaches in the recent past.   It can and will happen to anyone regardless of size - please do not think that it won't happen to you!

Culture of Security and Privacy:

HIPAA Training is not HIPAA Compliance.   Practices should take these requirements seriously as they are here to protect patients and medical professionals.   Protect yourself and your patients by incorporating a culture of security and privacy compliance in your medical practice.

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The Benefits of HIPAA Compliance Services for Physicians

The Benefits of HIPAA Compliance Services for Physicians | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

As a doctor, you have your hands full just taking care of your many patients, running a practice, and providing quality healthcare service. The last thing you need to worry about is whether your practice is being managed properly when it comes to Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) compliance.

 

HIPAA regulations can be complex – at least to an inexperienced or understaffed office management team – and there’s no margin of error for unintended breaches that can lead to costly penalties. That’s why it’s important that your practice utilizes professional HIPAA compliance services that offer these key benefits:

Protection against rampant data breaches

HIPAA data breaches happen at an alarming rate. Employee carelessness is a major contributing factor.  According to the HIPAA JournalData breaches caused by employee carelessness have increased year on year. More unencrypted devices are being lost, data still is being inadvertently disclosed, and simple email errors are still being made. Performing regular training on data privacy and security can help to reduce the number of data breaches suffered.”

 

To reduce – if not eliminate – your risk, you may need on-site compliance experts who are not only able to answer your questions at every step during the process, but who can educate and empower your workforce. These experts can provide real-time advice for best practices for securely handling protected health information, protecting patient privacy, and understandinghow to avoid potential breaches.

A customized HIPAA risk management plan

No two practices are alike. Which is why your HIPAA risk management plan must be unique for your practice. Look for a compliance service provider with decades of experience in internal investigations, regulatory compliance, inspection, facility security, risk mitigation, and health information technology can give your practice an invaluable preventative edge.

Supporting evidence that your practice is exercising due diligence

The greater your medical practice can demonstrate its efforts to exercise reasonable diligence to mitigate risk, the greater your chances of avoiding civil monetary penalties. In the event of a breach of electronic medical records, or if your practice is subjected to a HIPAA compliance investigation, your compliance services provider can provide assistance in sufficiently answering any questions the HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR) may ask about your compliance program.

 

Colington Consulting takes the uncertainty out of what is reasonable and appropriate for HIPAA compliance for your practice. We provide HIPAA risk assessments and on-site facility security surveys by our team of experts. Unlike other service providers that use web-based formats and expect you to answer questions you can hardly understand, we always conduct the assessment, value your input, and use a common-sense approach to compliance.

 

We are experts in the field of HIPAA rules and procedures. Colington Consulting can help you avoid problems and steep fines by bringing your practice into complete HIPAA compliance. It is what we do best, allowing you to do what you do best … provide health care to your patients.

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Fax Sent to Wrong Number Results in HIPAA Violation

Fax Sent to Wrong Number Results in HIPAA Violation | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

One morning, the office manager got a call from one of the practice's patients, Mr. M, a 52-year-old, HIV-positive man who had been seeing Dr. G for a decade. Although he was happy with the treatment he had been receiving, Mr. M's company was promoting him and he was relocating to another town. He called to ask Dr. G to fax his medical records to his new urologist.

 

The office manager was juggling numerous tasks, but managed to send the fax out later that day. The office did not have personalized fax cover sheets, just sheets that the office manager printed off once a week which had spaces to fill in the “to” and “from” sections. She hurriedly filled them in and shot off the fax, one of several she had to do before checking in the next patient.

 

At the end of the day she told Dr. G that it had been done. He thought nothing of it until the following Monday when the office manager came into the back office to speak to him. She was pale and looked shaken, and the physician immediately asked if she was okay.

 

“It's Mr. M,” the office manager said. “He just called – absolutely furious. He says that we faxed his medical records to his employer rather than his new doctor, and that now his company is aware of his HIV status. He is extremely upset.”

 

“I'm so sorry,” the office manager said tearfully. “I was the one who sent that fax out. I must have accidentally grabbed the wrong number from his file. What should we do?” She looked at Dr. G for guidance.

 

Dr. G was holding his forehead, and trying to figure out how to remedy the situation. “The first thing we're going to do is to call Mr. M and apologize. Then we'll take it from there.”

 

The office manager and Dr. G called Mr. M and apologized profusely for the mix-up. Mr. M understood that it had not been done maliciously, but he was still not satisfied and reported the incident to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Office for Civil Rights (OCR).

 

An initial investigation indicated that the incident was not criminal and so it was not referred to the Department of Justice.

 

Rather, it was handled by the OCR. OCR officials appeared at Dr. G's office to look into the matter, and after a thorough investigation, the OCR issued a letter of warning to the office manager, referred the office staff for HIPAA privacy training, and had the office revise the fax cover sheets to underscore that they contain a confidential communication for the intended recipient only.

 

Legal Background
The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, commonly known as HIPAA, protects personally identifiable health information of patients, and specifies to providers how such information may be used. HIPAA has been in effect for about a decade, and in that time, the HHS has received a total of almost 80,000 complaints.

 

Of those, more than 44,000 were dismissed, 19,000 were investigated and resolved with changes to privacy practice, and 9,000 were investigated but no violations were found. According to HHS, private medical practices were the ones most often required to take corrective action as a result of enforcement.

 

The top two compliance issues most frequently investigated are impermissible use and disclosure of protected health information and lack of safeguards for protected health information.

 

When a HIPAA complaint is filed with the HHS, the first determination made is whether there was a possible privacy violation and whether it was of a criminal nature. If it was determined to be criminal, the case is referred to the Department of Justice for investigation and possible prosecution.

 

If it was determined that it was not a criminal issue (as in this case) the violation is investigated by the OCR. If it is determined that a HIPAA violation did, in fact, take place, the OCR can either obtain voluntary compliance, corrective action or some other voluntary agreement with the offender, or the OCR can issue a formal finding of violation and force the offender to change its practices.

 

In this particular case, the office manager and Dr. G recognized the mistake and immediately tried to take corrective action by apologizing to the patient. Dr. G's office also voluntarily agreed to extra compliance training for the staff and to a change in their faxing procedures to indicate that the faxed materials are confidential.

 

Protecting Yourself
This particular scenario was the result of a careless error. While a careless error can happen to anyone, one such as this could cause irreparable harm to the patient if his employer now views or treats him differently because of the new knowledge of his HIV-positive status.

 

Confidential patient records must be treated with the greatest of care as they contain information of an extremely personal nature. Many HIPAA cases have involved the unintentional divulging of the HIV or AIDS status of a patient.

 

In a similar case, a dental practice was reported for using red stickers and the word AIDS on the outside of patient folders. And in a case that took place in a hospital, a nurse and orderly lost their jobs for discussing a patient's HIV status within earshot of other patients.

 

A good rule of thumb is to treat a patient's confidential information as you would want yours to be treated, and then add a little extra security for good measure.

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OIG to CMS: Make EHR fraud prevention efforts a priority

OIG to CMS: Make EHR fraud prevention efforts a priority | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

The Office of Inspector General is once again calling out CMSfor failing to adequately address fraud vulnerabilities in electronic health records. Despite submitting recommendations back in 2013, a new OIG report underscored that the agency is still dragging its feet with implementing EHR fraud safeguards.  

 
Part of the Office of Inspector General's role is to audit and evaluate HHSprocesses and procedures and put forth recommendations based on deficiencies or abuses identified. Turns out, a lot of these recommendations are ignored, disagreed upon or unimplemented, according to OIG's new Compendium of Unimplemented Recommendations report. And EHR fraud is on that list. 
 
"HHS must do more to ensure that all hospitals' EHRs contain safeguards and that hospitals use them to protect against electronically enabled healthcare fraud," OIG officials wrote in the report. 
 
Specifically, audit logs should actually be operational when an EHR is available. And CMS should also develop concrete guidelines around the use of copy-and-paste functions in an electronic health record. According to OIG data, most hospitals using EHRs had RTI International audit functions in place, but they were significantly underutilized. What's more, only some 25 percent of hospitals even had policies in place regarding copy-and-paste functions. 
 
These recommendations have come up repeatedly in recent OIG reports, and despite CMS officials agreeing with the outlined recommendations, the agency is still not making it enough of a priority.  
In a January 2014 report, OIG also called out CMS for failing to make EHR fraud a priority. Specifically, OIG said, the CMS neglected to provide adequate guidance to its contractors tasked with identifying said EHR fraud, citing the fact that the majority of these contractors reviewed paper records in the same manner they reviewed EHRs, disregarding the differences. Moreover, only three out of 18 Medicarecontractors were found to have used EHR audit data in their review process. 
 
When it came to identifying copy-and-paste usage or over documentation, many contractors reported they were unable to do so. Considering some 74 percent to 90 percent of physicians use the copy/paste feature daily, according to a recent AHIMA report, the implications are significant. 
 
As Diana Warner, director of HIM practice excellence at AHIMA, recounted back at the October 2013 MGMA conference, that dueto copy-and-paste usage, they had a patient at her previous medical practice who went from having a family history of breast cancer to having a history of breast cancer. The error was caught by the insurance company, which thought the patient had lied, was poised to change her healthcare coverage. "We had to work for months to get that cleared up with the insurance company so her coverage would not be dropped," Warner said. "We had to then find all the records that it got copy and pasted into" incorrectly and then track down the locations the data was sent to.


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The Black Market For Stolen Health Care Data

The Black Market For Stolen Health Care Data | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

President Obama is at Stanford University today, hosting a cybersecurity summit. He and about a thousand guests are trying to figure out how to protect consumers online from hacks and data breaches.

Meanwhile, in the cyber underworld, criminals are trying to figure out how to turn every piece of our digital life into cash. The newest frontier: health records.

I grab a chair and sit down with Greg Virgin, CEO of the security firm RedJack.

"There are a lot of sites that have this information, and it's tough to tell the health records from the financial records," he says.

We're visiting sites that you can't find in a Google search. They have names that end with .su and .so, instead of the more familiar .com and .org.

After poking around for about an hour, we come across an advertisement by someone selling Medicare IDs.

We're not revealing the site address or name because we don't want the dealer to know we're watching.

According to the online rating system — similar to Yelp, but for criminal sales — the dealer delivers what's promised and gets 5 out of 5 stars. "He definitely seems legit" — to the underworld, Virgin says.

The dealer is selling a value pack that includes 10 people's Medicare numbers – only it's not cheap. It costs 22 bitcoin — about $4,700 according to today's exchange rate.

Security experts say health data is showing up in the black market more and more. While prices vary, this data is more expensive than stolen credit card numbers which, they say, typically go for a few quarters or dollars.

Health fraud is more complex. Records that contain your Social Security number or mother's maiden name are used for identity theft. Virgin predicts hackers could be using them for corporate extortion.

"A breach happens at one of these companies. The hackers go direct to that company and say, 'I have your data.' The cost of keeping this a secret is X dollars and the companies make the problems go away that way," he says.

Health care companies saw a 72 percent increase in cyberattacks from 2013 to 2014, according to the security firm Symantec. Companies are required to publicly disclose big health data breaches. And there have been more than 270 such disclosures in the last two years.

Jeanie Larson, a health care security expert, says cyber-standards are too low for hospitals, labs and insurers. "They don't have the internal cybersecurity operations."

Companies subject to federal HIPAA rules, which were designed to protect privacy, choose to interpret them loosely — in a way that gets around the basics, like encryption.

"A lot of health care organizations that I've talked to do not encrypt data within their own networks, in their internal networks," she says.

They assume, incorrectly, that the walls around the network are safe.

Larson is part of the industry group National Health ISAC which is trying to raise the bar and make hospitals more like banks when it comes to investing in security.

"The financial sector has done a lot with automating and creating fraud detection type technologies, and the health care industry's just not there," she says.

Orion Hindawi with Tanium, a firm that monitors computer networks, says health care providers are far from there. They've been racing to grow, to digitize health records, to make mobile apps, to acquire other companies — all this without having a basic handle on how big their networks even are.

"I was working with a customer recently, and I asked them how many computers they had. And they told me between 300,00 and 500,000 computers," Hindawi says.

Meaning his client basically didn't know.

"We see that often when we walk into a customer [office]," Hindawi says.

He wasn't surprised to hear that the health care company Anthem suffered a major cyberattack. Anthem revealed last week that as many as 80 million people's records may have been stolen. Hindawi says he expects to see many more Anthems.


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