HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices
82.6K views | +33 today
Follow
HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices
HIPAA Compliance and HIPAA Risk management Articles, Tips and Updates for Medical Practices and Physicians
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scoop.it!

The HIPAA Privacy Rule and Facility Directories

The HIPAA Privacy Rule and Facility Directories | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

The HIPAA Privacy Rule generally permits hospitals and other healthcare facilities to maintain facility directories that provide certain basic information about patients within the facilities.

 

The HIPAA Privacy Rule and facility directories is discussed below.

What are Facility Directories?

Under the HIPAA Privacy Rule, covered entities, including hospitals and other covered health care providers, may use the following protected health information (PHI) in facility directories:

  • A patient’s name;
  • A patient’s location in the covered entity’s facility;
  • A patient’s condition described in general terms, that does not communicate specific information about the individual; and
  • The individual’s religious affiliation.

Covered entities may disclose the appropriate directory information listed above – except for religious affiliation – to anyone who specifically asks for a patient by name. Religious affiliation may be disclosed to members of the clergy. 

 

 For example, the HIPAA Privacy Rule and facility directories regulations allows a hospital to disclose the names of Methodist patients to a Methodist minister unless a patient has restricted such disclosure. 

What Rights Does the HIPAA Privacy Rule and Facility Directories Regulations Allow Patients?

The patient must be informed about the information to be included in the directory, and to whom the information may be released. In addition, patients must have the opportunity to restrict the information or to whom it is disclosed. Patients also have the right to opt out of being included in the directory.

 

The patient may be informed about the information to be included, to whom it may be released, and the right to restrict and to opt out. A patient may make his or her preferences about being included in the directory known, either orally or in writing.  

Can Directory Information be Made Available During an Emergency?

Even when, due to emergency treatment circumstances or incapacity, the patient has not been provided an opportunity to express his or her preference about how, or if, the information may be disclosed, directory information about the patient may still be made available if doing so is in the individual’s best interest.

 

Directory information about a patient may not be made available during an emergency, if making such information available is inconsistent with any known preference expressed by the patient.

 

In emergency scenarios, the covered entity, as soon as practicable, must inform the patient about the directory, and provide the patient an opportunity to express his or her preferences about how, or if, the directory information may be disclosed. 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

Scoop.it!

Making The Most Out Of HIPAA/HITECH Compliance Consulting

Making The Most Out Of HIPAA/HITECH Compliance Consulting | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Times are changing, and as new laws affect the health care sector, you can’t afford any future issues due to non-compliance. Planning is essential to avoid unnecessary costs and save time.

 

Though a federal mandate, at iHealthOne we believe this proactive measure will enhance the privacy and security of your electronic health records.

 

If customers establish you are HIPAA/HITECH non-compliant, you risk affecting their willingness to disclose essential health information to you.

 

Thanks to HIPAA/HITECH compliance consultancy, you have no reason for any concerns. In this article, we’ll walk you through this essential regulatory process.

 

IS HIPAA/HITECH COMPLIANCE CONSULTANCY ESSENTIAL?

 

Whether a seasoned or new practice, it helps to accept guidance from a consultancy on all phases of compliance.

 

A consultancy does extra research on the necessary and up-to-date information your staff require for implementation. It can provide further training for stress-free self-administration and subsequent compliance.

 

Consultant professionals conduct a risk analysis and advise on setting up safeguards to avoid HIPAA/HITECH violations. They provide detailed reports on risk exposure, as well as checklists and customized forms that suit your company.

 

This includes breach notifications, disaster recovery, and risk management solutions. Consequently, this can play an important role in improving your health strategy plans for smooth operation.

 

WHO SHOULD CONSIDER HIPAA/HITECH COMPLIANCE CONSULTING?

 

If you’re an entity that covers or provides healthcare payments and treatments, and you have access to patient information, HIPAA/HITECH compliance consultancy is vital. This also includes subcontractors and healthcare business associates.

 

EXTRA TIPS ON COMPLIANCE

 

Ensure you always comply on time. This will pave the way for effective management of patient data security and assessment services. Also, it will save you unneeded lawsuits or hefty fines for non-compliance.

 

EHR1 has a compliance department that can help you recognize potential gaps while guaranteeing 100 percent client data security and confidentiality.

 

You gain the most out of our quality technical safeguards. With the EHR1 certified cloud-based dental software, we counsel you on corrective measures to adopt before a compliance review or OCR audit. You also have access to our:

• Vulnerability scans
• Network penetration testing
• Electronic health records software upgrades
• Effective incident response planning
• Implementation of an information security program
• Improved customer trust and organizational reputation services, among others.

 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

How to Engage on Social Media with HIPAA in Mind

How to Engage on Social Media with HIPAA in Mind | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Social media is a great tool for growing a healthcare business and connecting with patients on a new level. You have the ability to establish expertise, provide education, and create a brand. But, social media comes with certain risks for healthcare professionals who are not careful. This is important asHIPAA violations can have serious consequences.

 

The basic rules of engagement are simple: Don’t post too many times in one day, don’t make every post a self-promotion, and don’t forget to proofread. However, medical professionals must also keep HIPAA — The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act — in mind when using social media.

Read our HIPAA guidelines for three tips to avoid privacy violations when building your online presence.

 

Patrol for protected health information protected by HIPAA

HIPAA outlines 18 types of protected health information, or PHIs, that could reveal the identity of a patient. If any information you share online includes details that could lead back to a specific patient, you’re violating in HIPAA compliance.”

 

The information provided in your own social media profile — names, locations, photos, dates — combined with even minimal information from the post could paint a surprisingly clear picture of PHI with minimal detective work. You might think you’ve disguised their identity, but a good rule of thumb is to leave any biographical information out when posting on social networks.

 

Remember to also use a critical eye when it comes to sharing images. Do a quick scan to make sure a patient or their files aren’t visible in the background of a seemingly harmless office snap.

 

If your practice wants to use photography for marketing or educational purposes, ensure you have proper patient consent. Create a form that explicitly states why a photo or video is being taken and retains your rights to the imagery.

Maintain a professional profile

There is a difference between your personal and professional online presence. Although social media platforms can be a great tool for friends to stay in touch, using social media for business requires greater professional distance.

 

And while an increasing number of people are becoming active on social media, you should never post directly to a patient’s profiles or tag their account in a post, as this would be a violation of HIPAA laws.A patient might engage with your online presence on their own accord, perhaps through a comment on a Facebook post or a review on your Healthgrades profile. 

 

Don’t be afraid to respond back, just leave any additional details about the patient or their treatment out.

Create a HIPAA social media strategy for your practice, and stick to it

An online presence is essential to healthcare marketing, even for the busiest doctor. Set yourself up for success by sticking to a consistent schedule and strategy. Create a HIPAA-compliant social media policy for your practice to establish a brand voice and stay safe. If additional help is needed, you can empower your front office staff with greater responsibility.

 

First and foremost, you’ll need to educate your staff on HIPAA. Anything they post will reflect back on you and your practice, so be sure that whoever manages your social media knows how to look out for possible HIPAA violations.

 

You also might consider implementing a social media style guide with HIPAA in mind, which can give direction on the best practices for your content, tone, and branding. For example, you could provide a repository of HIPAA-compliant responses for your staff to reference when engaging with patients.

 

Every social action you take online conveys something about your practice, so be sure you portray a positive image to your patients while also protecting their privacy.

 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

mark's curator insight, May 3, 1:16 PM
Oxy Best Pharmacy, ship and do home delivery World Wide

BUY VYVANSE ONLINE, can be a smart move. It saves you money many times, as you remove the cost of a physical retailer. Online prices for medications are almost always lower, and when it comes to medications you require, any savings you can get can really help. You’ll often have to buy these medications regularly, and those costs can really add up. So buy drugs online gives you an opportunity to save a little time for you to buy will add up to substantial savings in time as you buy from home you need not take a drive to a pharmacy. If you want to buy Vyvanse online, then you’ve come to the right place visit Our Shop Page. To buy this medication from us you do not need a prescription and also it will be good if you have one as it will be way easy to make delivery without doing much on security. We’ll get the drug to you quickly, safely and you will pay online prices that easily beat out what you would pay at a physical pharmacy.

Why Us?

Payment methods: We take Western Union Money Gram, Bitcoin, Cashapp, and Zelle Payments. Order medications online from the best online pharmacy in the USA Here.

WE OFFER MONEY BACK GUARANTEE TO EVERYONE PURCHASING MEDICINES FROM US YOU CAN LOOK AT SOME FEW QUESTIONS THAT HAVE BEEN ANSWERED TO BACK THIS POINT HERE

If your package is not delivered to you because of our error, we will offer you a reshipment. We will ship a similar request for nothing out of your pocket. Inform us quickly in that regard so we solve the issue.

Buy Vyvanse Online HERE Now and have it delivered right at your doorsteps. Oxy Best Pharmacy is the best and secure place to order painkillers online. Customer satisfaction is our highest priority, and we never fail to exceed the customer’s expectations! Contact Oxy Best Pharmacy today for all of your meds. Order Vyvanse online and other highly controlled pills like BOTOX, MORPHINE, CODEINE, DIAZEPAM DILAUDID, SUBUTEX, FENTANYL PATCHES, XANAX, NEUROBLOC, OXYCODONE, OXYCONTIN, OPANA, ROXICODONE, SUBOXONE, OXYNORM AND RITALIN Online without Prescription. You are always welcome to our pharmacy at any time to enjoy from our best online services feel free to contact our pharmacy HERE

 

 

Scoop.it!

How to protect your organization against a HIPAA breach

How to protect your organization against a HIPAA breach | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Here’s the sad truth about information systems: Very few of them are safe from hackers. If cyber criminals can read President Obama's unclassified email, if foreign hackers can affect the screening of a major motion picture, and if an international ring of hackers can steal $1 billion from more 100 banks by—in part—causing ATMs to spew money onto sidewalks, then few IT systems are completely secure. 

 

 

The question, then, is: What steps should we take now to prepare? Having adequate insurance coverage is a good place to start, for a couple of reasons.

 

First,  adequate coverage that is tailored to fit a healthcare organization and that has appropriate liability limits makes sense for any business today. Read: Agency seeks to strengthen cyber defenses for insurers Second, all healthcare companies regardless of size need to be prepared to respond quickly.

 

A data breach makes all consumers, including patients and health plan members, extremely vulnerable. Once a breach occurs, consumers whose financial data and personal health information (PHI) are in the hands of criminals could lose thousands or even millions of dollars.

 

But also they could lose something of much more value: peace of mind. In addition, healthcare organizations have become prime targets because patient data has an even higher street value than other personal information. Last year, experts estimated that data from one patient was worth about $10 to a criminal, an amount that was 10 to 20 times higher than what one credit card number would fetch. 

 

Next: Why healthcare is more vulnerable to breaches     For all these reasons, it’s vital for those responsible for storing and securing patients’ and health plan members’ financial and health information respond quickly. Given that many healthcare providers maintain all three types of protected data—personal credit information personal identification information , and PHI—the opportunity for hackers to access all three types, and especially PHI, makes all healthcare providers and insurers attractive targets.

 

The longer we wait to inform patients and members, the more time criminals have to wreak havoc on bank accounts, credit cards, and to use medical information to their advantage. Retail breaches usually are limited to the theft of credit card or bank card data. In healthcare, we are more vulnerable to cyber crime because there are so many enterprises of various sizes, from small physician groups to the largest health insurers, and each one is a target. Each physician group and each healthcare organization regardless of size is linked to larger companies, such as hospitals and insurers, and to smaller companies, including systems vendors and other healthcare providers.

 

At each location in the chain, from a small three-member doctor group to a major national corporation, we’ve made IT systems easier to hack by allowing access to as many providers as possible so that physicians can see patients’ data from last week, last month, and last year. Also, we’ve granted patients wider access to their data through online portals that let them view their electronic health records easily from any device, including handheld tablets and smartphones. Improving access for patients and connecting more devices to networks makes it easier for criminals to gain access too. What’s more, providers have been converting millions of patients’ paper records to electronic data over the past few years.

 

While those paper records were inconvenient and easy to lose, they were at least more secure than electronic medical charts, a factor that might make physician groups the most vulnerable of all entities in healthcare. Not only is the data in today’s EHRs accessible to hackers, but many physician offices are in various stages of upgrading their EHR systems to comply with federal meaningful use regulations.

 

While they’re putting these systems in place, few physicians are worrying about installing comprehensive data-security systems. Next: How healthcare executives should prepare for potential breaches     Under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), physician groups and healthcare organizations of all sizes are responsible for ensuring that all business associates have secured their information systems. Keep in mind that third-party business-associate vendors cause a large percentage of data breaches.

 

So, for many reasons, it’s a dangerous time for anyone running a physician’s office. Having adequate cyber coverage will go a long way toward mitigating the damage of a breach.  Some policies automatically add cyber coverage o their typical malpractice insurance policies that often include services to take over the response function for the insured.

 

Such offerings are important because they allow any healthcare organization to deliver a fast, thorough, and appropriate response as soon as possible after a cyber hack of any kind. A quick response is vital to retaining the respect of your customers and vendors In addition, your coverage should allow you to offer all of your patients and employees credit monitoring for at least six months if not longer.

 

And the coverage should help patients and employees notify all of their credit card issuers. Your current cyber coverage might already include the services of a breach consultant who can advise you and—more importantly advise your patients or health plan members—about the steps to take to protect their data after a breach. Just having someone to consult with on such a treacherous issue could be enough to calm your nerves and those of your patients or plan members as well.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

Gabe Maxwell's comment, September 26, 2019 7:14 PM
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/buy-gushers-online/">Buy Gushers</a>
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/special-blend-10g-oral-applicator-3-pack/">Buy 10g Oral Applicator</a>
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/green-label-15g-oral-applicator-6-pack/">Buy 15g Oral Applicator</a>
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/buy-moonrocks-now/">Buy Moonrocks</a>
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/buy-nyc-diesel/">Buy Nyc Diesel</a>
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/buy-lemon-kush/">Buy Lemon Kush</a>
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/buy-zkittlez/">Buy Zkittlez</a>
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/buy-purple-kush/">Buy Purple Kush</a>

<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/buy-gelato-33/
">Buy Gelato</a>
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/buy-mango-kush/
">Buy Mango Kush</a>
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/buy-fire-og-kush/
">Buy Fire Og</a>
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/buy-death-star/
">Buy Death Star</a>
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/buy-green-crack-buy-green-crack-online/
">Buy Green Crack</a>
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/buy-grapefruit-kush/
">Buy Grapefruit kush</a>
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/ghost-train-haze/
">Buy Ghost Train Haze</a>

<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/chocolope/
">Buy Chocolope</a>
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/buy-banana-kush/
">Buy Banana Kush</a>
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/buy-headband/
">Buy Headband</a>
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/buy-golden-goat/
">Buy Golden Goat</a>
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/buy-orange-kush/
">Buy Orange Kush</a>
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/buy-northern-lights-2/
">Buy Northern Lights</a>
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/buy-grape-ape/
">Buy Grape Ape</a>
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/buy-agent-orange-buy-agent-orange-online/
">Buy Agent Orange</a>
<a href="https://getmedicalmarijuanaonline.com/product/buy-blueberry-kush-online/">Buy Blueberry Kush</a>
Scoop.it!

10 Best Practices for HIPAA Compliance 

10 Best Practices for HIPAA Compliance  | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

A failure to understand HIPAA requirements can be a very costly mistake, as CardioNet learned just a couple months ago. In April, the wireless health services provider agreed to a settlement of $2.5 million for a potential noncompliance with the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules. (1) The violation occurred when a company laptop containing the ePHI of 1,391 individuals was stolen from an employee’s vehicle parked outside their home. The Office for Civil Rights (OCR)’s investigation revealed that CardioNet had insufficient risk analysis and risk management processes in place at the time of the theft. In addition, the company’s policies and procedures implementing the standards of the HIPAA Security Rule were in draft form and had not been implemented. CardioNet was also unable to produce any final policies or procedures regarding the implementation of safeguards for ePHI, including those for mobile devices. 

 

“Mobile devices in the health care sector remain particularly vulnerable to theft and loss,” said Roger Severino, OCR Director. “Failure to implement mobile device security by Covered Entities and Business Associates puts individuals’ sensitive health information at risk. This disregard for security can result in a serious breach, which affects each individual whose information is left unprotected. 

 

Most HIPAA violations can be prevented by implementing HIPAA regulations into practice policies and procedures and ensuring all individuals with access to patient information receive the proper training. Below are ten best practices for keeping your practice HIPAA compliant.

 

10 Best Practices for HIPAA Compliance

  • Implement safeguards such as password protected authorization and encryption to access patient-specific information on all computers, laptops, and devices.
  • Practices should keep all patient paperwork, charts, and records locked away and safe out of the public's view. Never leave patient information out or unattended.
  • Computer programs containing patient information should be closed and logged out of when not in use. Never share passwords between employees.
  • Ensure all computers have updated anti-virus software installed. This will help keep a practice guarded against malicious software.
  • Limit emailing PHI if the information can be sent another way. When faxing PHI, always use a cover sheet.
  • Always properly dispose of information containing PHI by shredding paper files.
  • Make sure employees are aware that using social media to share patient information is considered a violation of HIPAA law.
  • If patient information is being accessed at home, ensure all home computers and laptops are password protected.
  • Back up all disks that contain PHI. Store patients’ information in a HIPAA compliant cloud server.
  • Compliance training is one of the simplest ways to avoid a violation. Practices should provide ongoing, up-to-date training on the handling of PHI for all employees.
Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Physicians: Protect Your Data from Hackers in 5 Steps

Physicians: Protect Your Data from Hackers in 5 Steps | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

According to a recent CNBC report, hackers may have stolen personnel data and Social Security numbers for every single federal employee last December. If true, the cyberattack on federal employee data is far worse than the Obama administration has acknowledged.

J. David Cox, president of the American Federal of Government Employees Union, believes "hackers stole military records and veterans' status information, address, birth date, job and pay history, health insurance, life insurance, and pension information; [as well as] age, gender, race data," according to the report. This would be all that is needed for cybercriminals to steal identities of the employees, divert funds from one account to another, submit fake healthcare claims, and create fake accounts for everything from credit cards to in-store credit card purchases.


Although physicians maintain personal and professional data which is especially valuable to thieves, you are not the federal government. Make it hard enough on cybercriminals, and they will move on for lower-hanging fruit. Readers Digest offers good advice in five simple steps in its article, "Internet Security, How not to Get Hacked":


1. Be aware of what you share.


On Facebook, Twitter, or social media, avoid posting birth dates, graduation years, or your mother's maiden name — info often used to answer security questions to access your accounts online or over the phone.


2. Pick a strong password.


Hackers guess passwords using a computer. The longer your password and the more nonsensical characters it contains, the longer it takes the computer. The idea here is that longer, more complicated passwords could take a computer 1,000 years to guess. Give 'em a challenge


3. Use a two-step password if offered.


Facebook and Gmail have an optional security feature that, once activated, requires you to enter two passwords: your normal password plus a code that the companies text to your phone-to access your account. "The added step is a slight inconvenience that's worth the trouble when the alternative can be getting hacked,"  CNET tech writer Matt Elliot told Readers Digest. To set up the verification on Gmail, click on Account, then Security. On Facebook, log in, click on the down icon next to Home, and then click on Account Setting, Security, and finally Login Approvals.


4. Use Wi-Fi hot spots sparingly.


By now, you probably know that Internet cafés and free hotspots are not secure. You shouldn't be doing your online banking from these spots. However, the little button that turns off your laptops Wi-Fi so that your laptop cannot be accessed remotely is also handy. In Windows, right click on the wireless icon in the taskbar to it off. On a Mac, click the Wi-Fi icon in the menu bar to turn off Wi-Fi.


5. Back up your data.


Hackers can delete years' worth of e-mails, photos, documents, and music from your computer in minutes. Protect your digital files by using a simple and free backup system available on websites such as Crashplan and Dropbox


Take this basic instruction and build on it yourself. Google, for example offers advice expanding on the concept of "stong passwords." The worst thing you can do is use "dictionary words," the word "password," and sequential keystrokes, such as "1234" or "qwerty," because the hacker's computers will try these first. For e-mail, pick a phrase, such as "[m]y friends Tom and Jasmine send me a funny e-mail once a day" and then use numbers and letters to recreate it as a cryptic password. "MfT&Jsmafe1ad."

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

PHI Protection: How to Secure Healthcare Data

PHI Protection: How to Secure Healthcare Data | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Healthcare data breaches have been highlighted recently, with several large breaches occurring over the last few months. Hackers target the healthcare industry as they hold a wealth of sensitive information on their patients, and often have less secure data than in other industries.

 

Ransomware attacks continue to rise as healthcare organizations often need to pay the ransom to get their data back.

 

A ransomware attack occurs when a hacker gains access to data, often encrypting the data until a sum of money is paid.

 

A healthcare organization losing access to their data can mean a matter of life or death, so they often pay the hackers.

 

As protected health information (PHI) is ten times more valuable than financial information on the darkweb, it is important to know how to implement PHI protection. 

How to Implement PHI Protection

PHI protection is an essential part of preventing or mitigating a healthcare breach. The first step to implementing PHI protection is to know where the sensitive data is stored, how it is transmitted, and how it is used.

 

Identifying these will allows an organization to determine what protections should be in place for each device, enabling more thorough security measures to be implemented. 

In addition organizations should:

  • Complete a security risk assessment (SRA) to determine where security measures may be lacking. Once gaps are identified, organizations should create remediation plans to ensure PHI protection. To be HIPAA compliant, covered entities and business associates must conduct thorough SRAs annually.
  • Encrypt data to reduce the risk of healthcare breaches. Encrypted data cannot be viewed without a decryption key, making it the most effective for PHI protection. Although not explicitly mandated by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), it is recommended.
  • Train employees on organization policies and procedures as well as HIPAA requirements. The majority of healthcare breaches occur as a result of human error. Employees must be trained on what constitutes PHI, and how to properly handle it. Additionally, employees should be able to recognize phishing emails and what to do if they suspect an email is malicious.
  • Vet vendors by sending them an SRA to complete. Covered entities have an obligation to ensure that the vendors that they are working with have the proper measures in place for PHI protection. If the vendor lacks security measures, they must implement adequate safeguards before they are permitted to receive PHI.
  • Sign business associate agreements (BAAs) with all vendors before PHI is shared. BAAs limit the liability for both parties in the event of a breach as they state that each party has agreed to be HIPAA compliant, and they are responsible for their own compliance.

PHI protection should be a top priority for anyone working in healthcare. Healthcare organizations that have the proper security measures surrounding PHI will limit the risk of experiencing a breach.

 

If a breach should occur, an organization that has proper PHI protection will be better prepared to respond to the breach. 

 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

Scoop.it!

Achieving HIPAA Compliance: Guide to Properly Disposing of PHI Hardware

Achieving HIPAA Compliance: Guide to Properly Disposing of PHI Hardware | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

What is HIPAA Compliance?

HIPAA, or The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, sets the standard for PHI protection.

 

Any company or organization that handles PHI must have security measures in place and adhere to them. There are two main categories of organizations covered by HIPAA:  ·

         

Covered Entities (CEs): This includes anyone that provides treatment, payment, or operations (commonly known as TPO) within a healthcare setting.

 

Business Associates: This includes anyone outside of the covered entity who may have access to patient information or provides any kind of support in treatment, payment, or operations of the organization.

Devices That May Contain PHI

It’s important to understand what types of hardware you may have in your office that could contain PHI; these include but are not limited to:

  • Laptops
  • Desktops
  • Smartphones
  • Printers
  • Copiers
  • USB Drives
  • Servers
  • Tablets
  • Fax Machines
  • X-Ray Machines
  • Pacemakers
  • Defibrillators
  • CT and MRI Scan Machines

Essentially, almost any connected device within a healthcare organization is vulnerable and may contain PHI that needs to be protected and disposed of properly when the time comes.

 

Under HIPAA law, your organization is required to document its disposal policy in your Security Policies and Procedures. Your organization should maintain an inventory of all your equipment, whether each device can store or access PHI, serial number and other relevant information. 

How to Securely Dispose of Hardware With PHI

The US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recommends the following three techniques for properly removing any sensitive information from workplace hardware. Before you can get rid of the physical device, you must delete any and all PHI related information from the device.

The procedures for securely disposing of PHI include:

 

1. Clearing 

Clearing, also referred to as overwriting, is the process of replacing PHI on a device with non-sensitive data. This method should be performed, at a minimum, of seven times so that the PHI is completely irretrievable.

 

2. Purging 

You can purge your organization’s hardware through a method called degaussing. This refers to the process of clearing a device through the use of magnets.

 

Hard drives rely on magnetic fields to store information; therefore, you can disrupt the equipment’s function and render its data unreadable by using a strong magnetic field.  

 

3. Physical Destruction 

Physical destruction is the only surefire way to prevent a leak of PHI data. Destruction of PHI hardware requires pulverizing, burning/melting, disintegrating or shredding.

 

This method, however, is not always viable. If you have equipment that you would like to clear and re-use, or if your equipment is rented, destroying it may not be feasible.

Conventional Methods of “Wiping” Your Hard Drive Won’t Cut It 

If your organization is selling or discarding any hardware, you may be tempted to simply erase the hard drive components. Deleting files will not permanently delete PHI. Although the information will no longer be visible to you, it is still there and can be retrieved.

 

You need secure data destruction that permanently eliminates PHI data from every piece of hardware so that your patients’ information is not put in jeopardy.

 

There are companies who specialize in the proper disposal of PHI hardware. These companies should offer a HIPAA Certificate of Destruction as validation that the equipment was disposed of properly, and within HIPAA guidelines.

Training Employees on PHI Disposal

HIPAA law regarding disposal of protected health information dictates that you train your employees on how to properly dispose of PHI.

 

According to HIPAA law, any workforce member who is involved in disposing of PHI or who supervises others who dispose of PHI, must receive proper PHI training.

 

PHI should be maintained in a secure area, such as a locked depository bin, and disposed of through a qualified vendor. 

Requirements for Keeping PHI Hardware

HIPAA requires businesses to store PHI for six years, sometimes seven years, depending on the state in which you operate.

 

It is important to keep this in mind when you are preparing to dispose of hardware that may have PHI on it that still needs to be retained. Make sure you have a backup plan in place for PHI before disposing of hardware.

 

Your business reputation depends on your ability to serve your clients or patients. This includes making sure that the personal information they trusted you with is never compromised by improper or careless disposal of hardware. 

 

 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

mark's curator insight, May 3, 10:56 AM
Oxy Best Pharmacy, ship and do home delivery World Wide

BUY VYVANSE ONLINE, can be a smart move. It saves you money many times, as you remove the cost of a physical retailer. Online prices for medications are almost always lower, and when it comes to medications you require, any savings you can get can really help. You’ll often have to buy these medications regularly, and those costs can really add up. So buying online gives you an opportunity to save a little time for you to buy will add up to substantial savings in time as you buy from home you need not take a drive to a pharmacy. If you want to buy Vyvanse online, then you’ve come to the right place visit Our Shop Page. To buy this medication from us you do not need a prescription and also it will be good if you have one as it will be way easy to make delivery without doing much on security. We’ll get the drug to you quickly, safely and you will pay online prices that easily beat out what you would pay at a physical pharmacy.

Why Us?

Payment methods: We take Western Union Money Gram, Bitcoin, Cashapp, and Zelle Payments. Order your medications from the best online pharmacy in the USA Here.

WE OFFER MONEY BACK GUARANTEE TO EVERYONE PURCHASING MEDICINES FROM US YOU CAN LOOK AT SOME FEW QUESTIONS THAT HAVE BEEN ANSWERED TO BACK THIS POINT HERE

If your package is not delivered to you because of our error, we will offer you a reshipment. We will ship a similar request for nothing out of your pocket. Inform us quickly in that regard so we solve the issue.

Buy Vyvanse Online HERE Now and have it delivered right at your doorsteps. Oxy Best Pharmacy is the best and secure place to order painkillers online. Customer satisfaction is our highest priority, and we never fail to exceed the customer’s expectations! Contact Oxy Best Pharmacy today for all of your meds. Order Vyvanse and other highly controlled pills like BOTOXMORPHINECODEINEDIAZEPAM DILAUDIDSUBUTEXFENTANYL PATCHESXANAXNEUROBLOCOXYCODONEOXYCONTINOPANAROXICODONESUBOXONEOXYNORM AND RITALIN Online without Prescription. You are always welcome to our pharmacy at any time to enjoy from our best online services feel free to contact our pharmacy HERE

 

 

Scoop.it!

What is a HIPAA Violation? What Are The Fines /Penalties? 

What is a HIPAA Violation? What Are The Fines /Penalties?  | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Signed in 1996, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) is legislation that provides data privacy and security provisions for safeguarding medical information. Essentially, if you’re handling, transmitting, in possession of, or responsible for any health records; you’re going to need to be in compliance with HIPAA.

 

Regulation around HIPAA is strict and specific. However, what happens if HIPAA guidelines aren’t followed to the letter?

It’s important to know what constitutes a HIPAA violation for the sake of personal data.

 

Did you know that there are stiff penalties and fines for a violation? A breach could also destroy your business and your credibility within the healthcare community.

HIPAA Penalty & Fine Structure

What are the consequences of violating HIPAA?

There are four tiers of HIPAA violations:

 

    • Tier 1. Lack of awareness where a covered entity or individual was unaware that the act in question was a violation. Fines start at $100 and go up to $50,000 per violation, topping out at $1.5 million each year.
    • Tier 2. Reasonable cause to believe the individual or entity knew about the rule or regulation. Issues at this tier are considered a lack of due diligence. The fines range from $1,000 to $50,000 per violation. The maximum fine is $1.5 million per year.
    • Tier 3. The HIPAA violation was performed with willful neglect. The party then corrected the violation within the required time period of 30 days after discovery. Fines at this tier start at $10,000 and go to $50,000. The maximum penalty is $1.5 million per year.
    • Tier 4. At this tier, the violation was made with willful neglect of HIPAA Rules. Further, the entity made no effort to correct the violation. There is a standard $50,000 fine per violation at this tier with a maximum fine of $1.5 million each year.

 

There are also criminal penalties for HIPAA violations and potential jail sentences:

    • Unknowingly or with Reasonable Cause. The person may receive a jail sentence of up to one year.
    • False Pretenses may result in a five years’ maximum jail sentence and a fine increase to $100,000 per violation.
    • Personal Reasons or to Commit Fraud or a Crime. Malicious intent such as data breaches may lead to a jail sentence of up to 10 years and a fine up to $250,000 per violation.

 

As you can see from the HIPAA fines chart, the penalty structure for violations can act as a strong deterrent for healthcare organizations.

 

Recent HIPAA violations cases reported by federal law enforcement include:

    • Memorial Healthcare System received a fine of $5,500,000 in 2017
    • Children’s Medical Center of Dallas incurred a penalty of $3,200,000 in 2017
    • Advocate Health Care Network’s violation warranted a $5,500,000 fine in 2016
Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Why Ignoring the Minimum Necessary Standard in HIPAA Could Cost You

Why Ignoring the Minimum Necessary Standard in HIPAA Could Cost You | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Does your healthcare organization develop and implement policies and procedures that are appropriate and reflect your organization’s business practices?

Under the HIPAA Minimum Necessary Standard, all covered entities must have policies and procedures that identify who needs access to Protected Health Information (PHI) to perform their job duties, the categories of PHI required, and the conditions where access is justified.

 

For instance, as a hospital, you can allow doctors, surgeons, or others to access a patient’s medical records if they’re involved in the treatment of that patient. If the entire medical history is required, your organization’s policies and procedures must explicitly state so and include a justified reason.

 

As a provider, you also need to take reasonable steps to make sure that no PHI is accidentally available for access. For example, if you’ll be hosting a meeting in your office, then you must ensure that no one from the meeting can access PHI documents accidentally.

How Does The Minimum  Necessary Requirement Work?

As the name implies, under the HIPAA Minimum Necessary Standard, it’s mandatory for covered entities to take reasonable measures to limit the use or disclosure of PHI and requests for PHI, to the minimum necessary needed to achieve the intended goal.

However, it’s important to note that the minimum necessary standard does not apply to:

  • Requests for disclosure by a healthcare provider for treatment purposes  
  • Disclosing information to the patient in question   
  • Uses or disclosures after a patient’s authorization  
  • Uses or disclosures needed to comply with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Administrative Simplification Rules  
  • Disclosing PHI to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under the Privacy Rule for reasons of enforcement  
  • Disclosing PHI for use under other laws

The Minimum Necessary Standard of the HIPAA Privacy Rule requires that your covered entity develops and implements policies and procedures that are appropriate for your organization and that reflect your business’ practices and workforce. Only those who need access to PHI should receive access, and even then, the PHI should be restricted to the minimum necessary information needed to perform the job.

Why Does It Matter?

Did you know the healthcare industry is one of the most vulnerable sectors when it comes to cyber-attacks and data theft? If your organization fails to meet the minimum necessary standard, you could face fines of $50,000 or more.     

 

In fact, penalties for HIPAA violations can reach $1,500,000 annually per violation based on the type of breach.  

The largest American health data breach to ever occur took place in January 2015. It exposed the electronic PHI of nearly 79 million people and resulted in Anthem Insurance paying OCR $16 Million!  

The investigation found that Anthem did not perform

enterprise-wide risk analysis and the organization’s procedures did not regularly review information system activity. Anthem also failed to identify and respond to security incidents, and they did not implement proper minimum access controls to prevent the risk of cyber-attacks from stealing sensitive ePHI.

 

Complying with HIPAA’s minimum necessary standard matters if you want to avoid the risk of an expensive fine.

How Can You Comply?

Under HIPAA’s minimum necessary standard, the terms ‘reasonable’ and ‘necessary’ are open to interpretation and left up to the judgment of the covered entity. It’s up to your organization to determine what information should be disclosed and what information needs restricted access.

 

However, to make sure that you’re complying with this requirement, there are some basic steps you should follow:

  1. Prepare a list of all systems that contain PHI and what types of PHI they include.
  2. Establish role-based permissions that restrict access to certain kinds of PHI. All information systems should limit access to certain types of information. For instance, you can limit access to health insurance numbers, Social Security numbers, and medical histories if it’s not necessary for everyone to see that PHI.
  3. Design and implement a policy for sanctions if violations of the minimum necessary standard occur.
  4. Provide proper employee training about the types of information they’re permitted to access and what information is off limits. Be clear about the consequences of obtaining information when not authorized.
  5. Create alerts when possible that notify the compliance team if there’s an unauthorized attempt to access PHI.
  6. Ensure that the minimum necessary rule is being applied to all information shared externally, with third parties and subcontractors. It’s mandatory for covered entities to limit how much PHI is disclosed based on the job duties and the nature of the third party’s business.
  7. Perform annual reviews and periodic audits of permissions and review logs to determine if anyone has knowingly or unknowingly accessed restricted information. Such reviews may also be required when a major incident takes place, such as the treatment of a celebrity in your organization, or if a shooting or newsworthy accident takes place and your organization is involved.
  8. Document all actions taken to address cases of unauthorized access or accessing more information than is necessary and the sanctions that took place as a result.

Adhering to the HIPAA Minimum Necessary Standard is important to protect your organization and your patient relationships. When you take the appropriate steps to comply with HIPAA, you’ll not only have a much better chance of avoiding the risk of a costly data breach, but you’ll also build trust with your patients.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Is it Time for Your Organization to Hit the HIPAA Breach Panic Button? 

Is it Time for Your Organization to Hit the HIPAA Breach Panic Button?  | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Indeed, it is. According to the latest statics from the HHS Office of Civil Rights (OCR), 43% of all reported breaches are now caused by hacking or other related information network discrepancies—not to mention those breaches that are the result of impermissible disclosures made by members of the work force.

 

Let’s face it, breaches will happen, especially those related to information systems. When it comes to breaches, most network security experts say it is “when” and not “if.” Regardless of whether the breach is related to the network or some other means such as lost or stolen devices containing ePHI, what is important is having a process in place to deal with it. This includes the ability to conduct an internal investigation to determine the basics such as how the breach was caused, the type of breach, and how many individuals were affected.

 

The HIPAA Breach Notification Rule states that a breach is, generally, an impermissible use or disclosure under the Privacy Rule that compromises the security or privacy of the protected health information. The exception is when the covered entity or business associate, as applicable, demonstrates that there is a low probability that the protected health information has been compromised based on a risk assessment of at least the following factors:

  1. The nature and extent of the protected health information involved, including the types of identifiers and the likelihood of re-identification;
  2. The unauthorized person who used the protected health information or to whom the disclosure was made;
  3. Whether the protected health information was actually acquired or viewed; and
  4. The extent to which the risk to the protected health information has been mitigated.

 

So, what is the best way to conduct the breach risk assessment to determine this probability? Start with some type of Breach Notification Risk Assessment Tool which is a decision tree-based process. This will help determine if the breach is reportable. Even if the determination is made that the breach is not reportable, documentation that this assessment was conducted must be maintained.

 

Having a comprehensive breach notification policy is critical. This will save a lot of headaches and layout a process to follow during the period of uncertainty associated with a breach. The policy should state the obvious such as who needs to be notified internally within the organization, who is responsible for conducting the assessment, and what specific notifications need to be made. What is even more important is the actual procedure to implement the policy. Procedures should cover how to undertake the investigation of the breach to cover the who, what, how, and when of the occurrence. If it is a reportable breach, this type of information is required for submitting “Notice of a Breach” to the Secretary of HHS (which technically is delegated to OCR.) When submitting the Notice, one should be prepared to answer a number of questions. This is why it is important that the internal investigation uncover as much information as possible.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.