HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices
82.7K views | +35 today
Follow
HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices
HIPAA Compliance and HIPAA Risk management Articles, Tips and Updates for Medical Practices and Physicians
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scoop.it!

HIPAA Media Access: Film Crews in Healthcare Facilities

HIPAA Media Access: Film Crews in Healthcare Facilities | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)’ Office for Civil Rights (OCR) has issued several Notices of Enforcement Discretion during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

As such, OCR will not be imposing sanctions on covered entities for good-faith violations of certain rules. OCR will continue to impose sanctions for other violations.

 

One violation for which OCR will continue to apply sanctions is the violation of the HIPAA Media Access rule.

 

Under the HIPAA Privacy Rule, media and film crews may not access healthcare facilities where patient PHI is accessible, unless certain safeguards are in place.

HIPAA Media Access: When Can Film and Media Crews Access Healthcare Facilities?

Under the HIPAA Media Access rule, healthcare providers may permit media and film crews to access their facilities where PHI is accessible – but only if the facility first obtains written authorization from patients.

 

HIPAA does not permit covered health care providers to give the media, including film crews, access to any areas of their facilities where patients’ PHI will be accessible in any form (e.g., written, electronic, oral, or other visual or audio form), without

first obtaining a written HIPAA authorization from each patient whose PHI would be accessible to the media.

 

In addition, when film crews (after obtaining written patient authorization) access areas in which patients are present, the healthcare facility must put reasonable and appropriate safeguards in place to protect against unauthorized disclosure of PHI.

 

In the latest guidance on the topic, OCR explains that reasonable and appropriate safeguards include, among others, placing privacy screens on computer monitors to prevent electronic PHI (ePHI) from being viewed.

 

Safeguards also include using opaque barriers to ensure that patients who have not signed written authorizations are not filmed.

 

OCR has taken the matter of unauthorized filming of patients very seriously in recent years. In 2018, OCR initiated enforcement actions against Boston Medical Center, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Massachusetts General Hospital, after it was discovered they had given film crews access to their facilities without first obtaining authorization from patients.

 

They were fined a total of $999,000 for the HIPAA violations.

 

“The last thing hospital patients need to worry about during the COVID-19 crisis is a film crew walking around their bed shooting ‘B-roll,’” said Roger Severino, OCR Director.  “Hospitals and health care providers must get authorization from patients before giving the media access to their medical information; obscuring faces after the fact just doesn’t cut it.”

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

Leone Mane's curator insight, May 25, 2:44 AM

WELCOME TO RX ONLINE PHARMACY

Buy Oxycodone Online HERE at RX Pharmacy Online Store. Patients should buy Oxycodone Online from RX Pharmacy Online store which is the best online store for your pain pills.  Oxycodone is an opioid analgesic medication synthesized from the base. It was developed in 1916 in Germany, as one of several new semi-synthetic opioids with several benefits over the older traditional opiates and opioids; morphine, diacetylmorphine(heroin) and codeine. It was introduced to the pharmaceutical market as Eukodal or Eucodal and Darkon. Its chemical name is derived from codeine – the chemical structures are very similar, differing only in that the hydroxyl group of codeine has been oxidized to a carbonyl group (as in ketones), hence the -one suffix, the 7,8-dihydro-feature (codeine has a double-bond between those two carbons), and the hydroxyl group at carbon-14 (codeine has just hydrogen in its place), hence oxycodone. So buy oxycodone online

 

Tendencies towards the use of the internet pharmacies are observed not only in developed countries such as the USA and Canada but also within the territory of other countries. The advantages of internet shopping cannot be overstated. Every user can order the delivery of medications in a couple of minutes.

 

Tendencies towards the sale of the over-the-counter (OTC) drugs are also observed because it helps to save money and time. If a person does not have insurance covering all medical services, it is necessary to pay for the doctor’s consultations and quality medications. Expensive drugs become less demanded and popular under the conditions of the modern pharmaceutical market.

 
 
 
 

FAST – FRIENDLY – DISCRETE – RELIABLE

At Marijuana weed online Shop, we have made it our mission to provide customers with high-quality services and high-quality marijuana at affordable prices! Marijuana weed online Shop is your one-stop-shop for affordable, quality marijuana delivered right to your door. We are a safe, secure, and discreet mail-order marijuana service in the USA. Easy to order, quick delivery, and some of the best quality marijuana, you’ll never have to stress about ordering your medical marijuana. Why did we choose the marijuana industry? Throughout the years we have seen just how amazing medicinal marijuana can be for people who suffer from a variety of different diseases, disorders, and conditions. We are passionate about helping people with the medicinal benefits of marijuana, which is exactly why we offer the services that we do. With our mail order service, we strive to get our customers the medical marijuana they need, when they need it. Buy kush online online dispensary | medicated marijuana

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 

 


Buy Oxycodone Pills Online|Buy Oxycodone Pills Online without prescription

Adderall Online without a doctor's prescription|Buy Adderall Online

Buy hydrocodone online|Hydrocodone is an opioid pain medication

Buy Oxycontin Online Cheap Without Prescription|Buy Oxycontin Online

Buy Demerol Online Without Prescription|Buy Cancer pills online

Buy Dilaudid Online Overnight|Buy Dilaudid Online 

Buy Percocet Online without Prescription|Buy Percocet Online

Buy Morphine Sulfate Online Without Prescription|Buy Morphine Sulfate Online

Buy Roxicodone 30 mg Online Without Prescription|Buy Roxicodone 30 mg Online 

Buy Ambien Online|Order Ambien online without prescription

WERE CAN I BUY SODIUM CYANIDE ONLINE

buy sodium cyanide

sodium-cyanide-for-euthanasia

buy sodium cyanide online

buy sodium cyanide in china 

buy sodium cyanide in  USA 

buy sodium cyanide in Uk 

BUY RESEARCH CHEMICALS IN CHINA |Buy sodium cyanide online|Sodium cyanide for Euthanasia

Buy Etizolam Powder in the USA|BUY Etizolam online |BUY Etizolam online in China

WERE TO BUY Etizolam USA POWDER, PILLS, LIQUID

best-online-lab-to-buy-etizolam-pills

buy etizolam online

Buy Ketamine powder|Buy pills online in China|Order Ketamine online

Buy Flakka A-PVP online(alpha-PVP)|Buy Flaka A-PVP in china

Buy METHAMPHETAMINE Online|Buy Crystal meth online

muscle-builders

2 Month Hard Core Stack

AlphaSize Alpha GPC

Massacr3 with Laxogenin | 60 capsules

Laxosterone | 50 mg | 60 Capsules

Ecdysterone (95% Beta Ecdysterone) 90 Capsules



BUY AMBIEN 2MG


BUY OPANA 40MG ONLINE


BUY OXYMORPHONE ONLINE


PERCOCET 10MG


Buy 8 Mg Red Devil alprazolam online


Buy Adderall XR 30 MG


BUY CHEAP DILAUDID ONLINE


BUY MALEGRA FXT PLUS 160MG ONLINE


BUY KAMAGRA GOLD ONLINE


ECSTASY (MDMA) 100MG ONLINE


BUY CHEAP HYDROCODONE ONLINE


BUY CHEAP PRANDIN ONLINE


BUY LEXAPRO TABLET ONLINE


Buy Actavis Cough Syrup Online


Ecdysterone (95% Beta Ecdysterone) 90 Capsules


Buy Methamphetamine (meth crystal)


Buy Ketamine powder


JUUL Pod Menthol 4 Pod Pack


Buy Stiiizy online


Buy Golden Teacher Mushrooms online


BUY CHEAP CYMBALTA ONLINE


BUY CHEAP TRENTAL ONLINE


BUY TRAMADOL PILLS ONLINE


BUY CHEAP MAXALT ONLINE

 

Köp Valium (Diazepam) 10mg

 

Köp Oxikodon 30mg

Scoop.it!

Is Google Forms HIPAA Compliant?

Is Google Forms HIPAA Compliant? | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Google Forms is a cloud-based form that can be used to conduct surveys or fill out questionnaires.

 

A provider may use Google Forms to get feedback from patients about recent appointments, or to inquire if they would be interested in a particular service, should the provider choose to add it to their services.

 

However, before a provider may use Google Forms for this type of communication, it is important to determine whether or not Google Forms is HIPAA compliant. Google Forms HIPAA compliance is discussed below. 

Google Forms HIPAA Business Associate Agreement

A key factor when determining a software’s HIPAA compliance is the willingness to sign a business associate agreement (BAA). Google Forms is part of Google’s G Suite offerings, and as such is covered under the G Suite business associate agreement. Before a user is permitted to use Google Forms in conjunction with protected health information (PHI), the user must sign Google’s BAA.

 

For more information on how to get your Google Forms HIPAA BAA, please click here.

Google Forms HIPAA Safeguards

In addition to its willingness to sign a BAA, HIPAA compliant software must include safeguards to ensure the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of PHI: 

  • Access controls. Allows administrators to designate different access levels to information based on an employee’s job function.
  • Audit controls. Tracks access to information to ensure that protected health information is accessed in accordance with the HIPAA Privacy Rule minimum necessary standard.
  • User authentication. Utilizes unique login credentials to ensure that users are who they appear to be.
  • Encryption. Masks sensitive data so that it can only be accessed by authorized users.

For more information on Google Forms HIPAA compliant configuration, please click here.

Google Forms HIPAA Training

No software is fully HIPAA compliant, it is up to the end user to ensure that it is being used in a HIPAA compliant manner. Google Forms HIPAA training is essential for all users to understand how to use the platform in a HIPAA compliant manner. All employees that will be using Google Forms should be trained on proper use before they are permitted to use the platform. 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

Scoop.it!

Telemedicine and HIPAA 

Telemedicine and HIPAA  | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

The digital age has presented numerous benefits for a variety of economic sectors with the health industry among the biggest winners.

 

From faster communication between patients and health professionals to better service delivery, health organizations have seen improvements in a variety of daily operations. Sadly, the digital age is a double-edged sword, and as more health organizations use the latest technology, there is the looming threat of poor data security.

 

Threats such as the WannaCry ransomware attacks, which have wreaked havoc on the economy to date, are a constant reminder that data security should be a priority for organizations looking to leverage advancements in technology.

 

For instance, while telemedicine promises improved service delivery, it introduces a security complexity.

 

HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) regulations have been a cornerstone for setting and raising the security standards in healthcare, and telemedicine might actually make it easier for health organizations to remain compliant.

 

At the same time, a lot has to be done to improve the security loopholes presented by such technologies.

 

Here are how HIPAA and Telemedicine fit with each other and the things that need to be done for better data security.

The Constant Threat Of A Data Breach

Data collected by health organizations can be a gold mine for most threat actors. Some of the Protected Health Information (PHI) data include personal addresses, names, medical history, identification numbers, and even credit card numbers.

 

In the wrong hands, these data can be used for identity theft, for buying medical supplies fraudulently, or even holding health data at ransom as in the case of WannaCry attacks.

 

The sad truth is that ePHI will be at the disposal of threat actors unless the right security controls are put into place.

 

First, unless internal organization systems are strong enough, it can be easy for hackers to gain access to networks or even user accounts.

 

In some cases, they may only need to access a low-level user account before escalating their privileges. Second, when it comes to third party business stakeholders, failing to pick security-concerned partners will easily lead to data breaches.

 

Lastly, insider threats continue to be a risk. If access control isn’t a staple of a health organization’s security system, it can be easy for a disgruntled employee to offer this data out to threat actors.

 

All these are concerns that can be handled by HIPAA compliance, and embracing telemedicine with HIPAA compliance at the back of your mind is a step in the right direction.

How Telemedicine Has Revolutionized The Health Sector

In a nutshell, telemedicine has made the transfer of medical data at a distant quite easy. Diagnoses, medical history, lab tests, and prescriptions can be transferred more easily and cheaper than normal.

 

It also saves the costs of having to transfer patients from their homes to hospitals for diagnoses that could easily be done via video calls.

The HIPAA Rules That Affect Telemedicine

The HIPAA guidelines cover more than the patients and doctors communicating ePHI at a distance. It deals with the communications channels and any third party involved in the communication process. Ideally, for telemedicine to be compliant with HIPAA, the parties involved need to comply with these security rules:

  • Ensure that only the authorized parties gain access to ePHI
  • The channels of communication used to communicate ePHI at a distance ought to be secure enough to the standards of HIPAA.
  • There needs to be a system in place for monitoring the different communications containing ePHI to prevent the chances of accidental or malicious data breaches.

As long as physicians have effective safeguards in place for addressing access control, the first bullet point should be easy to comply with. As for the second point, insecure channels such as email, Skype, and SMS are eliminated from ever being used. Lastly, the onus is upon those in charge of the ePHI technology to ensure that there are systems in place that can help monitor communication and facilitate the deletion of unused data if the need arises. Both of the last points also look to address issues relating to where ePHI is stored.

Why Conventional Communication Channels Might Not Suffice

If the ePHI created by a physician (covered entity) is stored by a third party, the third-party and the covered entity have to sign a Business Associate Agreement (BAA).

 

The BAA ought to include details about the methods the third party will use to secure the data and procedures for auditing the data’s security in accordance with the HIPAA guidelines.

 

Since the copies of ePHI are bound to remain in the servers of conventional communication firms, such as Google, Verizon, and Skype, the covered entities ought to have a BAA with such bodies to remain compliant with HIPAA. Sadly, Verizon, Google, and Skype might not enter into such BAAs, meaning that the covered entities will remain liable for fines for any breaches that occur from the lack of HIPAA compliance by these third-party entities.

 

The covered entities, telemedicine providers, might also fail HIPAA audits.

Aligning Compliance And Telemedicine

The ideal messaging solution should be secure. It should also offer the same communication speed as Skype, SMS, or email, while also complying with the HIPAA security rule. This means that only authorized users should be allowed to access ePHI, the communication channel should be secure, and it should be fairly easy to monitor the activity on the channel.

 

The channels of communication should also be user-friendly enough for both patients and physicians to use during interactions.

 

Each authorized user can gain access to the channel through a centrally-issued username and password, which allows them to communicate with other users within the private communication network of the covered entity.

 

The channel should allow all types of communications, including images, documents, and videos. These media should be encrypted both while in transit and at rest. As for monitoring the communication, the messages should be monitored through a cloud-based platform to ensure secure messaging policies are adhered to according to HIPAA rules.

Telemedicine Makes HIPAA Compliance Easier

While this might seem hard to believe, telemedicine might actually make compliance to HIPAA easier for health entities. Unlike convention medical services that had to introduce HIPAA compliance as an afterthought, telemedicine can be crafted with HIPAA compliance at the center of it all.

 

As such, any applications and technologies used in the communication of ePHI at a distance can leverage the latest technological advancements and data security practices.

 

These can include multiple data encryption methodologies and even comprehensive system testing. Any partnerships with third-party vendors will also be based on whether they can have a sustainable BAA with them or not.

 

Telemedicine presents too big an opportunity to be ignored. Even better, the HIPAA guidelines can act as a baseline for security standards for health organizations looking to embrace telemedicine. Since it is easy to be compliant, keen organizations can enjoy its perks without fearing costly fines.

 
 
Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

Dr. Gayathri Duraipandiayan's curator insight, May 15, 4:02 AM

Telemedicine is one of the most useful useful healthcare tech available today. It has certainly proved to be a vital tool during the COVID-19 pandemic. But, there are few aspects that every provider must consider before launching a telemedicine practice https://bit.ly/2Z6owG4

Scoop.it!

Electronic Health Information Exchange and HIPAA

Electronic Health Information Exchange and HIPAA | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Under the HIPAA Privacy Rule, the use or disclosure of protected health information (PHI) is permitted for treatment purposes. Electronic health information exchange – a method of data transmission allowing healthcare professionals and patients to access and secure PHI electronically – facilitates quality treatment, without running afoul of the HIPAA Privacy Rule or the HIPAA Security Rule.

What is Electronic Health Information Exchange?

Electronic health information exchange (HIE) is a method of secure electronic data transfer. The data that is transferred is ePHI, or electronic protected health information. ePHI of patients may, consistently with the HIPAA Security Rule and the HIPAA Privacy Rule, be shared among covered entities.

 

Electronic health information exchange (HIE) allows medical professionals and staff to securely share patients’ vital information electronically. This secure sharing improves the speed, quality, safety, and cost of patient care. 

 

Electronic health information exchange can:

  • Improve the completeness of patient records. Past history, current medications, and other information can be shared between patients and providers; between covered entities; and between covered entities and medical staff.
  • Better-informed decision making at the point of care, thereby allowing providers to:
    • Avoid readmissions, thereby saving costs.
    • Avoid prescribing errors, thereby improving the quality of care.
    • Improve the accuracy of diagnoses.
    • Decrease duplicate testing, thereby saving costs and reducing expenses.

 

Perhaps the chief benefit of electronic health information exchange is that it allows for standardization of data. Standardization allows the data that is transferred to seamlessly integrate into a recipient’s Electronic Health Record (EHR), further improving patient care.

 

For example:

  • If laboratory results are received electronically and incorporated into a provider’s EHR, a list of patients with diabetes can be generated. The provider can then determine which of these patients have uncontrolled blood sugar and schedule necessary follow-up appointments.

 

There are currently three key forms of health information exchange:

 

  • Directed Exchange: ability to send and receive secure information electronically between care providers to support coordinated care
  • Query-based Exchange: ability for providers to find and/or request information on a patient from other providers, often used for unplanned care
  • Consumer Mediated Exchange: ability for patients to aggregate and control the use of their health information among providers

 

The foundation of standards, policies and technology required to initiate all three forms of health information exchange are complete, tested, and available today. 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

mark's curator insight, May 3, 10:55 AM
Oxy Best Pharmacy, ship and do home delivery World Wide

BUY VYVANSE ONLINE, can be a smart move. It saves you money many times, as you remove the cost of a physical retailer. Online prices for medications are almost always lower, and when it comes to medications you require, any savings you can get can really help. You’ll often have to buy these medications regularly, and those costs can really add up. So buying online gives you an opportunity to save a little time for you to buy will add up to substantial savings in time as you buy from home you need not take a drive to a pharmacy. If you want to buy Vyvanse online, then you’ve come to the right place visit Our Shop Page. To buy this medication from us you do not need a prescription and also it will be good if you have one as it will be way easy to make delivery without doing much on security. We’ll get the drug to you quickly, safely and you will pay online prices that easily beat out what you would pay at a physical pharmacy.

Why Us?

Payment methods: We take Western Union Money Gram, Bitcoin, Cashapp, and Zelle Payments. Order your medications from the best online pharmacy in the USA Here.

WE OFFER MONEY BACK GUARANTEE TO EVERYONE PURCHASING MEDICINES FROM US YOU CAN LOOK AT SOME FEW QUESTIONS THAT HAVE BEEN ANSWERED TO BACK THIS POINT HERE

If your package is not delivered to you because of our error, we will offer you a reshipment. We will ship a similar request for nothing out of your pocket. Inform us quickly in that regard so we solve the issue.

Buy Vyvanse Online HERE Now and have it delivered right at your doorsteps. Oxy Best Pharmacy is the best and secure place to order painkillers online. Customer satisfaction is our highest priority, and we never fail to exceed the customer’s expectations! Contact Oxy Best Pharmacy today for all of your meds. Order Vyvanse and other highly controlled pills like BOTOXMORPHINECODEINEDIAZEPAM DILAUDIDSUBUTEXFENTANYL PATCHESXANAXNEUROBLOCOXYCODONEOXYCONTINOPANAROXICODONESUBOXONEOXYNORM AND RITALIN Online without Prescription. You are always welcome to our pharmacy at any time to enjoy from our best online services feel free to contact our pharmacy HERE

 

 

Scoop.it!

How to Prepare For A HIPAA Compliance Audit in 2019

How to Prepare For A HIPAA Compliance Audit in 2019 | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

1. Focus on HIPAA training for employees

Staff training is critical for an understanding of HIPAA compliance requirements. Employees who haven’t been trained or don’t have experience with compliance regulations can increase the risk of a failed audit.

 

Document your training to show the OCR (Office of Civil Rights), that you are dedicated to employee instruction. Create and publish policies that make training and education a priority. Make sure your team is thoroughly trained before the audit because OCR will ask questions to ensure everyone understands HIPAA regulations and compliance rules.

2. Create a Risk Management Plan and Conduct a Risk Analysis

A risk management plan and a risk analysis are required.

A HIPAA risk analysis looks for any security risks your company might be exposed to – all risks. The risk management plan is a strategy to address those risks.

 

In conducting the risk assessment, you should also prepare your security documents. Compliance rules state reports should be recorded, written, and kept in an easily accessible location. Rules should be specific to all aspects of your business, and not isolated to one area.

 

For example, all policies regarding the HIPAA privacy and security rule should be documented. Documents that cover incident response, breach notification, IT and firewalls, and physical security should be included. These documents will not only help in the audit process but provide clear direction in the operation of the business.

 

3. Select a Security Assessment and Privacy Officer

HIPAA requires a security and privacy officer for each covered entity and business. This does not have to be a new hire, but you do need someone responsible for the security and privacy of PHI. They are responsible for showing the effort being made to meet regulations.

 

The officer should also review business associate agreements. The OCR will discuss the third-party relationships that involve electronic protected health information. Create a list of vendors and suppliers, and the security and safeguards they have in place through the business associates agreement.

 

This officer should schedule a regular review of security policies and conduct a risk analysis on IT systems and data security. They should also have a record of any breaches or incidents. Don’t try to hide any problems or data breaches during the audit. Be honest. Incidents happen, and the OCR wants to know how you responded to the security breach.

4. Review Policy Implementation

As important as it is to document policies and procedures, it’s also important to see how those policies are being implemented. The OCR will review how those policies and procedures apply to the daily business operation, and if they are implemented consistently.

Talk to your team to see how the policies are working.

 

If employees are struggling to follow policy, then take the time to analyze the problems and make adjustments as needed. Create an implementation schedule to include in the audit. The OCR wants to see the policies in action. If you are still implementing the plans, then show them the schedule, so that they know progress is being made.

5. Conduct an Internal Audit

An internal audit program is the best way to identify problems in your system before the OCR audit. Regularly conducting internal audits will not only help you solve problems before they turn into a fine, but also keep your team sharp and take pressure off during the actual review.

 

It’s often a good idea to work with an organization that specializes in compliance or data security to help conduct the internal audit. They can review your security and compliance standards and take a close look at your risk analysis and risk management plan. With an outside perspective, they may be able to identify problems that didn’t show up in your internal risk assessment. Partnering with an IT and data security provider will help ensure a complete and thorough internal audit.

 

As a best practice, review your policies and procedures as the auditor might. Consider if the policies are meeting the intent of the regulation and improving patient privacy and security. By critically analyzing these methods, you can find areas of improvement in both business operations and HIPAA compliance.

6. Create an Internal Remediation Plan

Once you’ve gone through the above steps and conducted an internal audit in preparation for your HIPAA audit, you should create a remediation plan to reduce risks and correct findings. Attach a schedule with timelines to the remediation plan and be prepared to discuss the plan with OCR during the audit.

 

While HIPAA sets guidelines and standards for protected health information, it’s also essential to see HIPAA as a continual process. A remediation plan and a schedule help to keep covered entities and businesses on track and compliant, even between audits.

 

Finally, make sure you limit your internal audit concerns to the policies and procedures of your business. While the business associate agreements are an important part of HIPAA, focusing on vendors and suppliers can leave your operations at risk. Your primary concern with the remediation plan and audit should be internal processes.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

HIPAA Regulations for Radiologists 101

HIPAA Regulations for Radiologists 101 | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

HIPAA regulations are a complex set of rules and regulations that are designed to promote a more patient oriented medical system that enhances patient care. HIPAA regulations that promote the accessibility of medical records to patients and increase the security of electronic patient health information are also included in the HIPAA Omnibus Rule. Radiologists often receive patients through a referral system or send patient files to another medical doctor or facility after x-rays and other scans are interpreted. This constant sharing of sensitive patient information makes learning what are HIPAA regulations and how do they affect radiologists an important task for any radiologist.

 

HIPAA Omnibus Rule

The HIPAA Omnibus Rule has changed the way that patient information is collected, stored, transmitted and created in response to the HITECH Act. The HITECH Act offers organizations incentives for using electronic patient health information while improving the security of that data. When asking what are HIPAA regulations one of the most important things to consider is your organization’s privacy policy. New HIPAA regulations state that organizations and entities must update their privacy policies and business agreements to comply with the current standards.

 

Current HIPAA standards require that all businesses sharing patient information must be HIPAA compliant. For instance, if a radiologist receives referrals or bills insurance companies on behalf of clients, the insurance company and the organization referring clients should both be HIPAA compliant. Current business associate agreements will be allowed until late September of 2014, but after that date all business associates will need to comply with the HIPAA Security Rule to avoid penalties or fines.

 

What is Affected by HIPAA?

Nearly every aspect of creating, sharing and transmitting electronic patient health information has been affected by new HIPAA regulations. In addition to revising and updating your organization’s privacy policies and business agreements, you will also need to look at your internal records storage and the accessibility of patient records. For instance, your internal computer systems must be secure and protected from data loss or third-party access. Data encryption is required anytime that you transmit electronic patient information. If your organization is using a third-party storage system for patient health information, the company providing web-based storage services will also need to be HIPAA compliant.

 

One of the areas that will be most affected for radiologists is how patient information is disclosed. Since radiology is a field where referrals are very common, care must be taken to ensure formal, written consent is provided each time you share patient health information. For example, a radiologist sending the results of an x-ray to a general practitioner will need to have written consent by the patient to do so. In order to understand and comply with current HIPAA regulations, it is best to use a HIPAA compliance checklist and HIPAA compliance software. HIPAA compliance software will walk you through the process of meeting current HIPAA regulations and help you avoid the confusion of updating and revising your current policies and practices on your own.
Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

How HIPAA Helps Strengthen Patient Trust

How HIPAA Helps Strengthen Patient Trust | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Trust is a vital factor that affects the success of any relationship, whether it be personal or professional. Without this foundational element, interpersonal and business relationships would be filled with suspicion and uncertainty leading to conflict and ultimately the disintegration of any bond that existed.

 

In today’s digitally-driven world, this core human value is now more critical than ever. Many of the transactions we perform daily force us to deal with entities we have never met in real life. Dealing with any organization that processes and stores our personal data requires us to trust that they will honor their commitments and keep our sensitive information secure.

 

When it comes to healthcare, patient trust is a core element of any practice. Any incident that jeopardizes patient trust can destroy the relationship and threaten the future of the organization.  As people are effectively placing their health and welfare under the direct care of a practitioner, trust is effectively the only human emotion at play in this relationship.

 

We not only trust them with our lives but with keeping our medical information private and secure. Should this data be compromised in any way, it would not only place the patient in a precarious position but would also destroy the trust relationship that existed with the practitioner.

HIPAA Strengthens Patient Trust

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) helps strengthen patient trust in various ways. It provides mechanisms that enhance the transparency, privacy, and security of electronic healthcare information. Not only does the Act help prevent sensitive patient data from compromise, but it also gives patients access and protects their private medical information.

 

Under HIPAA, medical organizations and practitioners that process and store patient healthcare information must implement measures that ensure compliance with the obligations stipulated under the statute.

 

Some of these measures include conducting regular security risk assessments and deploying technologies that protect access to patient information such as Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA) and encryption.

 

Complying with the provisions specified under HIPAA should not only be seen as a legal or regulatory obligation but as accreditation that the organization takes patient confidentiality and security seriously. It helps build that vital trust factor as patients know that the entity has implemented the necessary safeguards needed to protect the privacy of their sensitive medical information. Achieving HIPAA compliance should therefore not be seen as a regulatory obligation but as an essential business practice that builds patient trust.

The Healthcare Industry is Not Immune to Cybersecurity Risks

As the world has become more digital and many of the vital services that run our lives have moved online, cybersecurity is a fundamental principle that every organization needs to put into practice. No enterprise is immune from a cyberattack, and this fact is particularly true for organizations that operate in the healthcare industry.

 

According to the 2018 Verizon Protected Health Information Data Breach Report, 58% of incidents involved insiders. This statistic highlighted the fact that healthcare is the leading industry in which internal actors are the biggest threat to an organization. It’s interesting to note that the majority of these incidents involved human error.

 

Although malicious actions such as misuse of information, physical intrusion, and hacking also contributed to breaches involving the healthcare industry, human error was a leading cause of data compromise. These statistics show the vital role HIPAA can play in helping organizations reduce the risk of data breaches involving protected health information.

How to Comply with HIPAA Rules

HIPAA compliance is not a one time exercise but an ongoing assessment that involves a synchronized endeavor involving people, processes, and technology. As human error is the leading cause of data breaches in the healthcare industry, it is vitally important to implement the safeguards that HIPAA has created to reduce the risk of intentional or accidental compromise of patient healthcare information.

 

Under HIPAA, there are specific obligations that are required and others that are addressable. Required safeguards are mandatory for any organization that stores, processes, or transmits electronically protected healthcare information. Addressable provisions are not mandatory, but organizations need to either implement these or provide evidence that shows that these are not relevant to their specific circumstances.

 

The HIPAA Privacy Rule deals with protected health information (PHI) in general.  The HIPAA Security Rule provides compliance regulations for electronic PHI (ePHI). Under this section of the Act, there are various administrative, physical, and technical safeguards that offer the appropriate measures healthcare organizations need to implement to ensure patient privacy and the security of their ePHI.

 

Administrative safeguards include actions such as undertaking risk analysis and performing an information system activity review. It also recommends that organizations conduct regular cybersecurity awareness training and create an incident response plan.

 

Physical safeguards include measures such as deploying facility access controls and implementing the necessary steps to securely and safely dispose of media that contain ePHI.

Finally, the technical safeguards specified under HIPAA’s security rule include legislative obligations that healthcare organizations need to implement such as ensuring unique user identification, creating an emergency access procedure, and installing technologies that provide data integrity and transmission security.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Strategies for Measuring HIPAA Compliance Efforts

Strategies for Measuring HIPAA Compliance Efforts | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

About 40% of large health care organizations do not take the time to measure how well their HIPAA compliance measures are working, according to Brian Wells, Chief Technology Officer of the cybersecurity firm Merlin International, headquartered in Vienna, Virginia. Most are unaware if they have thwarted cyberattacks, blocked malicious emails or kept staff from releasing inappropriate information.

 

“If they can't report that to the board, then they may stop giving them money to do more,” Wells said.

 

Measuring an organization's HIPAA strategy can be challenging. It is difficult to know if efforts to thwart cyberattacks have actually prevented breaches. “When ransomware like WannaCry comes out, it may be possible to say you protected yourselves,” he said. “If nothing bad has happened in a while, you can assume you are either doing a good job or just haven't been a target.”

 

How are providers supposed to measure HIPAA compliance effectiveness? Here are a few strategies for determining if an organization is on the right path using both internal and external resources.

 

A human touch
Wells works with hospitals now, but when he was on the medical practice side, his group performed annual testing on HIPAA regulations. The test was not hard, but everyone in the practice had to pass it. This not only lets a provider know where education is slipping through the cracks, but also provides a paper trail to point to should a practice get audited.

 

Adam Greene, a partner with Seattle-based Davis Wright Tremaine, also recommends informal testing to make sure people

 

understand their obligations under HIPAA. For example, the person in charge of HIPAA security can make a checklist to ask staff that includes questions like: “If someone wants to see something in their medical record, how would you respond?” Staff should know the patient has a right to records and the process involved in turning them over, be it filling out a form or directing the patient to the staff member who handles requests.

 

Another option is to assign an individual who would be accountable for walking around an office to ensure protected health information is secured properly. A few points to include would be ensuring computers are not facing toward patients; locked cabinets do not have the key hanging next to them; and people are logging out when they leave their computers.

“There could be a 10- to 20-question checklist and they can use it to see how they are doing and compare it over time,” said Marti Arvin, Vice President of Audit Strategy for CynergisTek, which is headquartered in Mission Viejo, California.

 

Arvin said an internal audit can be used to make sure staff members know where privacy policies are and that they are understood; whether all patients at their initial visit are provided with notices of privacy procedures; and if all of the staff members are receiving HIPAA training as they should.

 

Technology testing
Because health IT is constantly under attack, it would be difficult, expensive, and “voluminous” to show all of the attacks an organization has defended against, Greene said.

One option instead is to perform vulnerability scanning on a regular basis to examine if a system has unpatched software or other vulnerabilities. Another good practice is a phishing test. Here, an organization generates its own malware link and sends it to staff to see if anyone clicks.

 

Wells said an IT department can put in place a program that will check to see that people are only doing what they are supposed to be doing with their devices. It can also detect unmanaged devices that appear in the system. Electronic audit logs can be monitored to ensure people are not abusing their access.

 

Encryption is a must-have under HIPAA, and Greene said the best way to look at it is demonstrating that laptops are encrypted and will remain that way. For instance, someone with administrative rights can turn off encryption if they choose. But technical measures can be used to limit someone's ability to turn it off and to maintain compliance.

 

“Those things are really more to let you know how compliant you think you are,” Wells said. “For a full security audit, you are typically going to have to hire out.”

Keep it simple


Most physician practices are “dramatically under-resourced” in HIPAA staffing, Greene said. “The office administrator might be the privacy officer and maybe the security officer, too,” he said. “That is a lot of responsibilities, so providers need to give it some thought … and be careful about laying [extra responsibilities] on an office administrator who doesn't have enough time to do their regular job.”

 

Some of these auditing duties may need to be spread throughout an organization or hired out, but practices need to have an individual who is held accountable for auditing HIPAA policies. “There should be some oversight,” Arvin said. “Lots of practices give the title of security officer, but don't give resources or educate them on the responsibilities of overseeing the program.”

Greene also recommends making this a long-term endeavor. Instead of trying to look at all areas of compliance at once, he recommends starting with places where an office has had problems, where similar practices have had settlements, or where the Office for Civil Rights offers guidance.

 

For example, an individual responsible for HIPAA compliance might first spend some time ensuring staff members are providing patients with access to their records and if they are charging the right amount for them. Then he or she could move to other areas, such as disclosure of privacy practice guidelines.

“You can ultimately look at different regulatory requirements and create a master plan for how you are going to audit them,” he said. “Prioritize some immediately and others next year or the year after because they are seemingly lower risk.”

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

mark's curator insight, May 5, 5:28 PM
Oxy Best Pharmacy, ship and do home delivery World Wide

BUY VYVANSE ONLINE, can be a smart move. It saves you money many times, as you remove the cost of a physical retailer. Online prices for medications are almost always lower, and when it comes to medications you require, any savings you can get can really help. You’ll often have to buy these medications regularly, and those costs can really add up. So buy drugs online gives you an opportunity to save a little time for you to buy will add up to substantial savings in time as you buy from home you need not take a drive to a pharmacy. If you want to buy Vyvanse online, then you’ve come to the right place visit Our Shop Page. To buy this medication from us you do not need a prescription and also it will be good if you have one as it will be way easy to make delivery without doing much on security. We’ll get the drug to you quickly, safely and you will pay online prices that easily beat out what you would pay at a physical pharmacy.

Why Us?

Payment methods: We take Western Union Money Gram, Bitcoin, Cashapp, and Zelle Payments. Order medications online from the best online pharmacy in the USA Here.

WE OFFER MONEY BACK GUARANTEE TO EVERYONE PURCHASING MEDICINES FROM US YOU CAN LOOK AT SOME FEW QUESTIONS THAT HAVE BEEN ANSWERED TO BACK THIS POINT HERE

If your package is not delivered to you because of our error, we will offer you a reshipment. We will ship a similar request for nothing out of your pocket. Inform us quickly in that regard so we solve the issue.

Buy Vyvanse Online HERE Now and have it delivered right at your doorsteps. Oxy Best Pharmacy is the best and secure place to order painkillers online. Customer satisfaction is our highest priority, and we never fail to exceed the customer’s expectations! Contact Oxy Best Pharmacy today for all of your meds. Order Vyvanse online and other highly controlled pills like BOTOX, MORPHINE, CODEINE, DIAZEPAM DILAUDID, SUBUTEX, FENTANYL PATCHES, XANAX, NEUROBLOC, OXYCODONE, OXYCONTIN, OPANA, ROXICODONE, SUBOXONE, OXYNORM AND RITALIN Online without Prescription. You are always welcome to our pharmacy at any time to enjoy from our best online services feel free to contact our pharmacy HERE

 

 

Scoop.it!

Phase 2 HIPAA Audits Will Continue in 2017

Phase 2 HIPAA Audits Will Continue in 2017 | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Phase 2 HIPAA Audits are targeting random health care practices and organizations around the country. Having an effective HIPAA compliance program is the easiest way to pass your audit–read on to find out what you can to protect your behavioral health practice!

Upcoming Phase 2 Audit Protocols

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office for Civil Rights (OCR) first announced this new round of random audits in 2016. Phase 2 is the second time in OCR’s history that it has instituted a random audit program. Phase 1 HIPAA Audits were rolled out in 2011 and affected a similar number of health care providers across the country.

OCR has designed these Phase 2 audits to target a broad selection of HIPAA-beholden health care organizations. That includes both Covered Entities (CEs) and Business Associates (BAs).

HIPAA defines a Covered Entity is any health care provider, including Behavioral Health specialists, who create protected health information (PHI). PHI is any health data that can be used to identify a patient (including name, date of birth, social security number, address, medical data, etc.). HIPAA defines a Business Associate as any organization that encounters PHI over the course of the work it has been hired to do (examples include billing firms, cloud storage providers, faxing, shredding, copying, and IT providers, to name a few).

So how do you know if your behavioral health organization has been selected for a Phase 2 HIPAA audit?

OCR will reach out to your organization via email if you have been randomly selected for an audit. You should look out for emails from “OSOCRAudit@hhs.gov“.

Once you’ve been contacted for an audit, you will have 10 days to respond to OCR’s request for information. If your organization does not respond for any reason, federal investigators will continue to contact your organization until they receive a response–this includes finding publically available information to call or contact you.

One of the first things federal investigators will ask for is a complete list of your organization’s business associates, with contact information for each. Identify your business associates now so that you’re prepared for these upcoming HIPAA audits.

Additionally, your organization must have a HIPAA compliance program in place with full documentation that can be provided for OCR investigators.

Desk Audits vs. Onsite Audits

Phase 2 HIPAA Audits consist of a number of different stages.

The first stage is desk audits, which are a series of remote audits. OCR investigators will contact your organization via email and you’ll be prompted to send the appropriate information. Investigators will not come to your physical location, but you’ll still be required to comply with the investigation.

Onsite audits are another means of investigation that OCR is set to pursue in 2017.  Onsite Phase 2 HIPAA Audits will require federal OCR investigators to come onsite to inspect your organization. They will be checking your level of compliance with HIPAA regulation.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

States ramp up data security laws

States ramp up data security laws | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Healthcare organizations not only must heed federal data security laws; they also have state laws to keep in mind. And a growing trend has states making these regulations tougher than ever. One state that currently has no laws requiring organizations to implement certain data security protections has proposed legislation that would hold entities fully responsible for failing to safeguard consumer data.  

 
As businesses continue to demonstrate grievous security failings, New York state has decided to join a growing number of states that have chosen to ramp up their data security laws. The announcement last week from the state's Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman comes on the heels of a reportlast year, finding that nearly 23 million New Yorkers have had their personal records compromised since 2006. 
 
New York entities are only required to notify individuals of a data security breach if "private information" has been compromised. Private information, as state officials pointed out, has a very narrow definition and does not include email addresses and passwords; medical data and health insurance data, among other items. 
 
The proposed law would broaden the definition of private information to include email addresses, security questions and medical and health insurance data. The law would also establish a safe harbor rule for companies that implement specific data security plans and standards that officials say would minimize the chance of a breach. 
 
In 2013 – a "record-setting" breach year for New York – these data security breaches cost organizations a whopping $1.37 billion statewide. Some 40 percent of those breaches were hacking related, according to a 2014 N.Y. Attorney General report
 
What's more, healthcare organizations proved to be the biggest offenders, with healthcare data breaches being responsible for compromising the largest number of records of New Yorkers since 2006. "As the healthcare industry moves toward increasing digitization, it has become a repository for large troves of sensitive information, making the industry uniquely susceptible to data loss, particularly through lost or stolen electronic storage equipment," Schneiderman wrote in the report.  
 
"With some of the largest-ever data breaches occurring in just the last year, it's long past time we updated our data security laws and expanded protections for consumers," said Schneiderman in a Jan. 15 press release. "We must also remind ourselves that companies can be victims, and that those who take responsible steps to safeguard customer data deserve recognition and protection."
 
One of the state's biggest data breaches ever reported was announced by the New York City Health & Hospitals Corporation's North Bronx Healthcare Network, which compromised the health records of some 1.7 millionemployees, vendors and patients. 
 
In light of the increase in scope and frequency of these data security breaches, just last month, Oregon's AG Ellen Rosenblum called on the state's legislature to update and toughen Oregon's data breach law, which does not protect medical or health insurance data. Indiana's AG also in December proposed similar legislation that would tighten data security laws in the state. 


No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

How To HIPAA-proof Your Smartphone

How To HIPAA-proof Your Smartphone | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it
Healthcare individuals and organisations can often find themselves the prime target for security breaches, and for that reason they need to do their utmost in protecting the privacy of patient records and information. To that end, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 was introduced to set the standards required for protecting sensitive information, including saving, transmitting and accessing patient data and electronic files.

IT security has in recent years become a high priority for hospitals and other healthcare providers, as online attacks have risen. HIPAA has always been there to define the baseline for securing patient information from the cyber-criminals that target the healthcare industry. But, in January of last year, the department of Health and Human Services released an Omnibus Final Rule, which modified the HIPAA standards and placed new liabilities on individuals working in the healthcare profession.
Omnibus Final Rule Polices

These include:

Healthcare organisations (including business subcontractors and associates) being directly liable for compliance, as well as for penalties for all violations.
Risk assessment now must focus not on the harm to the patient but simply whether information has been compromised.
In the event of a security breach, patients, HHS and media must be notified within 60 days.
Breaches of limited data sets (i.e. data that does not contain birth dates or location information) are no longer to be treated as an exception, and must be treated in the same manner that all breaches of information are treated.

The result has led to a surge in regulatory and HIPAA privacy claims, with many involving nefarious acts by unhappy employees and disgruntled patients.

In one case, it is reported that a physician’s smartphone was compromised and over 30 unauthorized security breaches were recorded over the space of just a single four-hour period. The practice was required to notify hundreds of patients warning them of the potential leakage of their medical information, as well as reporting the incident to the press and the relevant government authorities as per HIPAA regulations.
Smartphones Extremely Vulnerable To Theft And Loss

Because of their portability and small size, mobile devices are particularly vulnerable to theft and loss, which indeed accounts for the majority of security breaches. Catherine Barrett of the Federal Working Group reports of a survey of 600 US hospital workers, which found that 66% of reported data breaches were as a result of a mobile device being lost or stolen.

Any unauthorised access to sensitive information on your smartphone or any other device constitutes as a violation to HIPAA privacy rulings. Even if you lose your phone, you are potentially putting that information at risk and you may well find yourself liable. If anyone other than you manages to access those files that are protected under HIPAA – even if the person who finds the phone has no malicious intent and is just being a bit nosy before handing the phone into the authorities – you are still in violation of HIPAA and are susceptible to punishment. Under the Omnibus Final Rule a breach is a breach, and there is no wiggle room when you find yourself in court.

HIPAA

The cost of a breach is a real one too. Although it is true that certain data breaches may well be covered by your insurance, the cost to your reputation (especially considering that you have no choice under HIPAA but to make public the infraction) is difficult to measure, and the time you and your staff will have to devote to addressing the issue is certainly not negligible.
How To HIPAA-Proof Your Smartphone

First and foremost you will of course want to HIPAA-proof your desktop and office systems, and something like PA File Sight is certainly something to consider – the software allows managers to view exactly who is accessing, reading from and editing any important and sensitive files on the system.

Once you have done this it is time to HIPAA-proof your smartphone and any other mobile devices.

Step 1. Activate Your Phone Passcode: Although this seems like a no-brainer, it is surprising how many people don’t even take this first very easy step. You will need to choose a four-digit passcode to access your phone, and it cannot be something that is easy to guess. No birthdays, addresses, phone numbers or special dates that are in any way related to you, as these can all be Googled. Your phone may have a special setting that will wipe all information from the phone if the incorrect passcode is entered more than a set number of times. Set this to, say, 5, and turn this setting on.

Step 2. Never Use Email: Email accounts are very easily hacked, especially if you are using your smartphone to transfer information. If a HIPAA Privacy claim was ever filed against you or your practice and it was discovered that you were sending sensitive information via email, you will not have a defensive leg to stand on. The problem is that regular email communications are not usually encrypted, so if you are using this method you need to stop immediately and switch to a cloud-based encryption service or use a virtual private network (VPN) only.

Step 3. Set A ‘Required Login’ For Accessing Apps: Although it is obviously very convenient to leave yourself logged in to your apps on your smartphone, you must never ever do so with any that deliver HIPAA sensitive information to your device. If someone were to gain access to your phone and you had left all of your apps open, then the person will have access to every file you have. Login each time – it might be inconvenient, but that’s just tough.

Step 4. Install an Encryption App: This is one sure-fire way to ensure that all files being transferred from and to your device remain protected should your device be compromised. Encryption apps will also protect the information that resides on your phone itself. There are many encryption apps available for both Apple and Android devices, some of which are so sophisticated that they even meet FBI standards. Though it is unlikely that you will need such a powerful (not to mention expensive) one, you will nonetheless be much better protected if your files are secured by some sort of encryption app on your phone. The apps can of course be configured to encrypt all of your phone’s data, or just the sensitive information that you select.

By following the above steps you will be slowing any hacker down considerably. Although these barriers could all be hacked by a serious or determined individual, it is much more likely that they will instead look to move onto the next unprotected device, which hopefully will be one that doesn’t contain any HIPAA sensitive data. Either way, if the information on your phone is securely protected, you should be able to avoid any HIPAA violations should your device become lost or stolen.
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Five Common HIPAA Compliance Issues to Avoid

Five Common HIPAA Compliance Issues to Avoid | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

In the news recently was a story about surgeons in China who were punished after taking group photos next to apparently unconscious patients.  In the photo, doctors and nurses in scrubs pose with a supposedly unconscious patient on the operating table in the operating room.  Of course, you cannot see the patient and, but for the headline, you could not tell from the photo whether it was even real or staged.  The public apparently found the #surgeryselfie unacceptable and the surgeons and nurses are now facing unknown consequences.

Violation of patient privacy rights is nothing new in the U.S.  If you look at some of the true stories that are listed on www.patientprivacyrights.org, you would be shocked at HIPAA violations that occur:

• In Florida, Walgreens Co. mailed free samples of Prozac Weekly to patients who were taking Prozac Daily.
• A Fort Lauderdale physician gave his fishing buddy, a drug company representative, a list of patients suffering from depression and the salesman arranged to send trial packages of Prozac Weekly to their homes without the patients’ knowledge or permission.
• A Pakistani woman threatened to post the entire medical files of over 300,000 patients of UC Medical Center (San Francisco) if she wasn’t paid for her medical transcribing services. The hospital was surprised to learn that the company awarded the job of transcribing the medical records had sub-contracted all those records to a company outside of the United States.
• A hospital employee easily viewed and stole Tammy Wynette’s medical records from the hospital’s databases and sold the information to the National Enquirer and Star.
• A banker who also served on his county’s health board cross-referenced customer accounts with patient information. He then called due the mortgages of anyone suffering from cancer.

Although these examples may be shocking, they are but a few of the routine HIPAA violations that occur daily across the country.   According to the Office for Civil Rights (OCR), since the compliance date of the Privacy Rule in April 2003, OCR has received over 105,960 HIPAA complaints and has initiated over 1,157 compliance reviews. 

Most HIPAA cases (23,181) have been resolved by requiring changes in privacy practices and corrective actions by, or providing technical assistance to, HIPAA covered entities and their business associates. 

OCR has investigated complaints against many different types of entities including: national pharmacy chains, major medical centers, group health plans, hospital chains, and small provider offices.

Based on OCR’s report, the compliance issues investigated most (in order of frequency) were:
1. Impermissible uses and disclosures of protected health information;
2. Lack of safeguards of protected health information;
3. Lack of patient access to their protected health information;
4. Lack of administrative safeguards of electronic protected health information; and
5. Use or disclosure of more than the minimum necessary protected health information.

Although most HIPAA cases appear to be resolved by the OCR, 540 referrals were made by the OCR to the Department of Justice for criminal investigation.  This would be for cases that involved the knowing disclosure or obtaining of protected health information in violation of the rules.

Finally, the most common types of covered entities that have been required to take corrective action to achieve voluntary compliance are, in order of frequency:
1. Private practices;
2. General hospitals;
3. Outpatient facilities;
4. Pharmacies; and
5. Health plans (group health plans and health insurance issuers).

As you will note, private practice are at the top of that list!  

As we head into 2015, among the many items to consider is whether your practice’s operations are compliant with HIPAA.   Although many groups complete required training, too many have become disinterested in HIPAA over time.  It’s a good idea to remind your staff of the consequences of violating HIPAA and to emphasize that comments on Twitter about patients, posting #surgeryselfies, or otherwise allowing curiosity to lead to inappropriate records review, will not be tolerated. 

In smaller physician offices, staff can become quite lax about password access and too casual about the use of e-mail, messaging and other types of patient interactions that are not HIPAA compliant. 

All of these areas are ones that should be revisited in the New Year. Make a resolution to revisit your practice’s commitment to HIPAA in 2015!


No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

HIPAA Security Evaluation – HIPAA Risk Analysis – Explained -

HIPAA Security Evaluation – HIPAA Risk Analysis – Explained - | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Compliance assessment? Security Evaluation? Risk Assessment? Risk Analysis? Compliance Analysis? Huh?

Lots of confusion continues to swirl around the difference between a HIPAA Security Evaluation versus HIPAA Security Risk Analysis.No wonder, the terms are often used interchangeably.

Let’s end the confusion…


Technically, one might argue when it comes to regulatory compliance of any type, three types of assessments can be completed:

1.Compliance Assessments (Evaluation, in HIPAA Security Final Rule parlance) answer questions like: “Where do we stand with respect to the regulations?” and “How well are we achieving ongoing compliance?”

2.Risk Assessments (Analysis, in HIPAA Security Final Rule parlance) answer questions like: “What is our risk exposure to information assets (e.g., PHI)?” and “What do we need to do to mitigate risks?”

3.Readiness Assessments answer questions like “Have we implemented adequate privacy safeguards?”, “Have we implemented adequate security safeguards?” and are we ready for audit.

We focus on the first two in this post because these are the ones you must complete.Both are Required by the HIPAA Security Final Rule.

A thorough HIPAA Security Compliance Evaluation broadly covers all aspects of the law including all 18 Standards and 42 Implementation specifications that comprise the Administrative, Physical and Technical Safeguards (CFR 164.308, 310, 312) in the HIPAA Security Final Rule.Additionally, this evaluation must cover CFR 164.314 and 316 related to Organizational Requirements, Policies and Procedures and Documentation.

As indicated above, completing this HIPAA Security Compliance Evaluation is required by every Covered Entity and Business Associate. The language of the law is in 45 C.F.R. § 164.308(a)(8):

Standard: Evaluation. Perform a periodic technical and non-technical evaluation, based initially upon the standards implemented under this rule and subsequently, in response to environmental or operational changes affecting the security of electronic protected health information, which establishes the extent to which an entity’s security policies and procedures meet the requirements of this subpart.

This type of assessment is a critical step and should be completed whether one is just starting a HIPAA Security Compliance program, rejuvenating an existing program and maintaining an existing program.The output of the evaluation establishes a baseline against which overall progress can be measured by the executive team, compliance or risk officer, audit committee or board.Think FOREST view. At the end of such an evaluation, one would have a Summary Compliance Indicator such as the one shown in the following Security Evaluation Compliance Summary:

A HIPAA Security Risk Analysis (§164.308(a)(1)(ii)(A)) is also required by law to be performed by every Covered Entity and Business Associate.Additionally, completion of the Risk Analysis is a core requirement to meet Meaningful Use objectives.Section 164.308(a)(1)(ii)(A) of the HIPAA Security Final Rule states:

RISK ANALYSIS (Required).

Conduct an accurate and thorough assessment of the potential risks and vulnerabilities to the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of electronic protected health information held by the [organization].

As required by The HITECH Act, the Office of Civil Rights, within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), has issued final “Guidance on Risk Analysis Requirements under the HIPAA Security Rule”.This guidance was published on July 8, 2010.No specific methodology was indicated.However, the guidance describes nine (9) essential elements a Risk Analysis must incorporate, regardless of the risk analysis methodology employed.We have designed a Risk Analysis methodology and ToolKit around these elements while using industry best practices.

As an example, upon evaluation of each information asset that creates, receives, maintains or transmits electronic Protected Health Information (ePHI), one would have an asset-by-asset evaluation of risk, along with mitigation actions involving new safeguards or controls:

Upon completion of the Risk Analysis for all information assets, an overall Risk Analysis Project Tracking tool would be used to ensure ongoing project management of the implementation of safeguards:

So, when it comes to HIPAA Security Compliance Evaluation, think:

  • Forest-level view
  • Overall compliance with the HIPAA Security Final Rule
  • Establishing baseline evaluation score for measuring progress
  • Asking: Have we documented appropriate policies and procedures, etc?
  • Asking: Are we performing against our policies and procedures?

When it comes to HIPAA Security Risk Analysis, think:

  • Trees/Weeds-level view of each information asset with PHI
  • Meeting a specific step in the overall compliance process
  • Understanding current safeguards and controls in place
  • Asking: What are our specific risks and exposures to information assets?
  • Asking: What do we need to do to mitigate these risks?

Both the HIPAA Security Compliance Evaluation and the HIPAA Security Risk Analysis are, required by law and important and necessary steps on your HIPAA HITECH Security compliance journey.


No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

The HIPAA Privacy Rule and Provider to Provider Communications

The HIPAA Privacy Rule and Provider to Provider Communications | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

The HIPAA Privacy Rule allows for provider to provider communications – for providers that are part of a patient’s care team – to exchange clinical information, including protected health information (PHI) among each other. 

 

Circumstances under which provider to provider communications involving use and disclosure of PHI are addressed below.

When Are Provider to Provider Communications Permitted Under the HIPAA Privacy Rule?

Generally, under the HIPAA Privacy Rule, which imposes restrictions on the use and disclosure of PHI by covered entities (including healthcare providers), any pertinent clinical care information, including mental health treatment information, can be disclosed and discussed between a patient’s current treatment providers (that is, can be the subject of provider to provider communications) without written authorization by the patient, representative, or guardian, except for the content of written psychotherapy notes.

What Constitutes Psychotherapy Note Information?

The HIPAA Privacy Rule definition of a “psychotherapy note” is quite restrictive. Under HIPAA, psychotherapy notes consist of:

  • A mental health professional’s written analysis, of
  • A conversation that occurred, during
  • A private counseling session

The written analysis must be maintained separately from the medical record to qualify as “psychotherapy notes.”

 

Generally, patients do not have the right to obtain a copy of these under HIPAA. When a psychologist denies a patient access to these notes, generally, the denial is not subject to appeal or review.

 

A provider may, in the exercise of his or her discretion, choose to provide a copy of the patient’s psychotherapy notes to the patient, consistent with applicable state law.

The Privacy Rule does permit psychotherapy notes to be disclosed under very limited circumstances:

  1. A covered entity may disclose protected health information contained in psychotherapy notes to a coroner or medical examiner for the purpose of identifying a deceased person, determining a cause of death, or other duties as authorized by law. 
  2. A covered entity may use or disclose protected health information in psychotherapy notes to the extent that such use or disclosure is required by law and the use or disclosure complies with and is limited to the relevant requirements of such law.
  3. A covered entity may use or disclose psychotherapy notes for its own training programs in which students, trainees, or practitioners in mental health learn under supervision to practice or improve their skills in group, joint, family, or individual counseling.
  4. A covered entity may use or disclose psychotherapy notes to defend itself in a legal action or other proceeding brought by the patient.
  5. A covered entity may, consistent with applicable law and standards of ethical conduct, use or disclose psychotherapy notes, if the covered entity, in good faith, believes the use or disclosure:
    • Is necessary to prevent or lessen a serious and imminent threat to the health or safety of a person or the public; and
    • Is to a person or persons reasonably able to prevent or lessen the threat, including the target of the threat.

 

A covered entity MUST disclose psychotherapy notes, when disclosure is required by the Secretary of Health and Human Services, to determine whether the entity is HIPAA compliant.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

Scoop.it!

Does the HIPAA Privacy Rule apply to the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)?

Does the HIPAA Privacy Rule apply to the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)? | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

The Novel Coronavirus is spreading so rapidly that it will most likely become a pandemic.

 

The World Health Organization says that a pandemic is the worldwide spread of a new disease. A pandemic is when an epidemic spreads between countries, per David Jones, MD, Ph.D.

 

Even in times of crisis like this, HIPAA-covered entities must follow all reasonable safeguards to protect the privacy of their patients who may be infected with the disease concerned, in this case, we are talking about the novel coronavirus. 

 

However, the HIPAA Privacy rule does offer some accommodation in such cases.

Special considerations in the HIPAA Privacy Rule

The HIPAA Privacy Rule provides special considerations in the event of an epidemic or pandemic. As a covered entity or business associate, you should be aware of these individual cases.

 

The Privacy Rule recognizes that public health authorities need some access to protected health information (PHI) to ensure public health and safety in the event of an emergency such as the one we are experiencing with the novel coronavirus.

 

Covered entities are authorized to disclose PHI, without a patient’s consent, if that PHI disclosure is needed to treat the patient or even to treat another patient.

 

Business Associates may also be able to disclose necessary information on behalf of the covered entity, as long as this disclosure is permitted within the parameters of the Business Associate Agreement.

What can you share with public health or disaster relief organizations?

The Department of Health and Human Services has stated explicitly that covered entities are permitted to disclose needed PHI to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) or a state or local health department when this disclosure is expected to help prevent or control a disease.

 

A hospital may, for instance, report periodically to the CDC about patients potentially or actually exposed to the novel coronavirus.

 

Similarly, they may also share protected health information with disaster relief organizations like the American Red Cross, that are authorized to coordinate relief effort and notify family members or others involved in the patient’s care.

Disclosing PHI to other individuals, family, and friends

Interestingly, covered entities are also permitted to disclose the minimum necessary PHI to persons at risk of contracting or spreading the disease, as long as another law allows the covered entity to make such a notification. 

 

Sharing needed PHI with family and friends is also allowed as long it is done in the best interests of the patient concerned.

 

Here the doctor or another healthcare provider must exercise his or her best professional judgment and make the decision appropriately.

 

What can you tell the media?

Protected health information that can identify a patient should typically not be disclosed to the media without the written authorization of the patient. There are definite exceptions for certain limited cases here, for which you may refer to the HIPAA Privacy Rule for guidance.

In conclusion

The summary is: In the event of an epidemic or pandemic, such as what the Novel Coronavirus is likely to be, follow HIPAA Privacy precautions carefully.

 

Disclose only the minimum necessary Protected Health Information (PHI) to public health organizations and friends and family of the affected patient, and only to the extent that this disclosure helps treat the patient or other patients, and is in the patient’s best interests.

 

Make sure that all your employees and health care workers are trained and well informed to make any decision using their best judgment.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

mark's curator insight, May 3, 10:57 AM
Oxy Best Pharmacy, ship and do home delivery World Wide

BUY VYVANSE ONLINE, can be a smart move. It saves you money many times, as you remove the cost of a physical retailer. Online prices for medications are almost always lower, and when it comes to medications you require, any savings you can get can really help. You’ll often have to buy these medications regularly, and those costs can really add up. So buying online gives you an opportunity to save a little time for you to buy will add up to substantial savings in time as you buy from home you need not take a drive to a pharmacy. If you want to buy Vyvanse online, then you’ve come to the right place visit Our Shop Page. To buy this medication from us you do not need a prescription and also it will be good if you have one as it will be way easy to make delivery without doing much on security. We’ll get the drug to you quickly, safely and you will pay online prices that easily beat out what you would pay at a physical pharmacy.

Why Us?

Payment methods: We take Western Union Money Gram, Bitcoin, Cashapp, and Zelle Payments. Order your medications from the best online pharmacy in the USA Here.

WE OFFER MONEY BACK GUARANTEE TO EVERYONE PURCHASING MEDICINES FROM US YOU CAN LOOK AT SOME FEW QUESTIONS THAT HAVE BEEN ANSWERED TO BACK THIS POINT HERE

If your package is not delivered to you because of our error, we will offer you a reshipment. We will ship a similar request for nothing out of your pocket. Inform us quickly in that regard so we solve the issue.

Buy Vyvanse Online HERE Now and have it delivered right at your doorsteps. Oxy Best Pharmacy is the best and secure place to order painkillers online. Customer satisfaction is our highest priority, and we never fail to exceed the customer’s expectations! Contact Oxy Best Pharmacy today for all of your meds. Order Vyvanse and other highly controlled pills like BOTOXMORPHINECODEINEDIAZEPAM DILAUDIDSUBUTEXFENTANYL PATCHESXANAXNEUROBLOCOXYCODONEOXYCONTINOPANAROXICODONESUBOXONEOXYNORM AND RITALIN Online without Prescription. You are always welcome to our pharmacy at any time to enjoy from our best online services feel free to contact our pharmacy HERE

 

 

Scoop.it!

3 Things Everyone Should Know About The HITECH ACT

3 Things Everyone Should Know About The HITECH ACT | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act passed into law on February 17th, 2009. Included in this bill is a section titled the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act, or HITECH for short.

 

This law allocates $18 billion as incentives through Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement systems, providing grants and revolving loan funds to hospitals and physicians considered meaningful users of electronic health records.

 

These grants and loan funds may be used to purchase EHRs and new healthcare technology. If you’re a small to medium sized healthcare practice in need of a consultation regarding HITECH Act compliance, then look no further.

 

EHR has a compliance department that will assist you with matters such as this. Listed are three things both eligible and ineligible providers should be aware of when demonstrating meaningful use of EHR systems, thereby improving health care throughout the country.

 

THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ISSUES “FINAL RULES”

 

The Department of Health and Human Services issued three final rules for the implementation of the requirements of the HITECH Act. The new rules stipulate that those who qualify for the incentive program can receive as much as $44,000 in grants and other incentives over a five-year term through Medicare.

 

Furthermore, up to $63,750 over 6 years through Medicaid. Hospitals can earn millions of dollars in grants and revolving loans for implementing and becoming meaningful users of certified electronic health records. The third rule establishes objectives for what is considered ‘meaningful use,’ also providing metrics eligible applicants must meet in order to reap all of the benefits of the EHR incentive program.

 

EHR TECHNOLOGY STIPULATIONS

 

In order to be compliant with the HITECH Act, another stipulation addressed in The Department of Health and Human Services final rules was the Temporary Certification Program for Health Information Technology.

 

This certification program establishes a process for businesses and professionals to test and certify for using EHR technology. If you want to take advantage of all the benefits this program has to offer, then you must certify first.

 

MEDICAID AND MEDICARE INCENTIVE PAYMENTS ESTIMATED TO RISE

 

Experts estimate that over the next ten years, the Federal government will spend over $26 billion in grants to medical professionals and hospitals implementing the standards set forth in the HITECH Act.

 

 

If you are a small to midsize healthcare practice looking to save money and benefit from the outstanding economic benefits the HITECH Act’s financial EHR implementation incentives provide, contact EHR1 today for a certified EHR and expert consulting.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

HIPAA Tips for Covered Entities & Employees

HIPAA Tips for Covered Entities & Employees | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Covered entities’ employees play an important role in keeping PHI and ePHI secure. The following HIPAA covered entity employee tips can be used by your organization as part of broader privacy and security effort. 

 

Five HIPAA Covered Entity Employee Tips – reminders that covered entity employees should give their workforce – include:

 

HIPAA Covered Entity Employee Tips:

 

Tip 1: Employees should never share login credentials. Since login information is used to track the actions of both authorized (i.e., users who have a legitimate need to access ePHI) and non-authorized users of ePHI, login credentials should neither be shared nor written down.

 

Tip 2: Employees who work for a covered entity, with whom employees have also treated, should not be permitted to access their medical records using their own login credentials.

 

Rather, covered entities should require employees to go through the same process for obtaining access as patients go through. As a general matter, employees who are authorized to access patient PHI are only authorized to access just that – patient PHI, as in PHI of others.

 

Employees who seek a copy of their medical records should submit a request for a copy of these records via HR. In order to gain access to their health data, they must submit a request for a copy of their health information via their HIM department.

 

Tip 3: Employees should be reminded that medical records are the property of the covered entity; accordingly, employees should not be allowed, upon their departure from a covered entity’s employ, to take medical records containing PHI with them.

 

Such information can be used for a variety of purposes that constitute data theft. These purposes include using the information to “recruit” patients to a different facility, or using the information to market or sell pharmaceutical products, just to name two examples. 

 

Tip 4: Employees should NEVER share ePHI on social media sites or through social media channels. Covered entities who have not already developed policies prohibiting such activities, should implement such policies at their earliest convenience.

 

The prohibition should extend to every type of social media, even to a social media platform (i.e., Twitter) that restricts the number of characters that a message can contain, and even so-called “closed” groups on sites such as Facebook. Once information is posted on social media, the information, by definition, has been made public.

 

In addition, ePHI that should never be shared includes not only data but also photographs or videos that could be used to identify a patient.  

 

Tip 5: Employees should be reminded that portable devices and documents containing ePHI or PHI should never be left unattended.

 

Devices can be misplaced or stolen, and the ePHI contained therein then taken by data thieves or cyber attackers.

 

The Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Office for Civil Rights (OCR) has not hesitated to fine organizations that suffered a data breach as a result of devices containing ePHI being hacked because the devices were left unattended. 

 

Devices should be encrypted and left attended at all times. In addition, care should be taken not to misplace or use paper documents. Such documents should not be kept in areas where they can be viewed by unauthorized individuals.

 
 
Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

HIPAA/HITECH Act and Compliance

HIPAA/HITECH Act and Compliance | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH Act) legislation was created in 2009 to stimulate the adoption of electronic health records (EHR) and supporting technology in the United States. It introduced the Meaningful Use program incentivizing healthcare organizations to maintain the Protected Health Information of patients in electronic format, rather than in paper files.

 

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), a Federal legislation that promulgated in 1996 requires the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to develop national standards to protect the privacy and security of patients’ medical records and other personal health information. It got ratified in 2013 calling as the “Final Omnibus” rule, to include Enforcement and Civil Penalties.

 

HITECH and HIPAA, are separate and unrelated laws, but they do reinforce each other in certain ways. For example, HITECHrequires that any physician and hospital that attests to meaningful use must also have performed a HIPAA security risk assessment as outlined in the Omnibus rule.

 

Who does HIPAA affect?

According to HIPAA, if you belong to the category of “covered entities” or “business associates,” and you handle “protected health information (PHI),” you are required to be HIPAA-compliant.

1.Covered Entities:

  • Health Care Providers like Doctors, Surgeons, Dentists, Psychologists, Podiatrists, Laboratory technicians, Optometrists, Hospitals, Clinics, Nursing homes, organizations in the life sciences field such as medical devices, biotechnology, Pharmacies, schools when they enroll students in health plans, nonprofit organizations that provide some healthcare services, and even government agencies.
  • Health Plans like Health Insurance Companies, HMOs, Employer-Sponsored Health Plans, Government Programs like Medicare, Medicaid, Military and Veterans’ health programs.
  • Healthcare Clearing Houses. These are organizations that collect information from a healthcare entity, processes the data in an industry-standard format and delivers it to another entity. Examples of clearinghouses include: Billing services, Community health management information system.

2. Business Associates:

  • "Business associate” refers to any organization or individual who acts as a vendor or subcontractor with access to PHI.
  • Examples of business associates include: Data transmission providers, Data processing firms, Data storage or document shredding companies, Medical equipment companies, Consultants hired for audits, Electronic health information exchanges, External auditors or accountants, Medical transcription companies, Answering services, Data conversion and data analysis service providers, Law firms, Software vendors and consultants, Financial institutions (if engaging in accounts receivable or other functions extending beyond payment processing), ISPs, ASPs, Cloud vendors, Researchers (if performing HIPAA functions for a covered entity), etc.
Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

mark's curator insight, May 3, 1:19 PM
Oxy Best Pharmacy, ship and do home delivery World Wide

BUY VYVANSE ONLINE, can be a smart move. It saves you money many times, as you remove the cost of a physical retailer. Online prices for medications are almost always lower, and when it comes to medications you require, any savings you can get can really help. You’ll often have to buy these medications regularly, and those costs can really add up. So buy drugs online gives you an opportunity to save a little time for you to buy will add up to substantial savings in time as you buy from home you need not take a drive to a pharmacy. If you want to buy Vyvanse online, then you’ve come to the right place visit Our Shop Page. To buy this medication from us you do not need a prescription and also it will be good if you have one as it will be way easy to make delivery without doing much on security. We’ll get the drug to you quickly, safely and you will pay online prices that easily beat out what you would pay at a physical pharmacy.

Why Us?

Payment methods: We take Western Union Money Gram, Bitcoin, Cashapp, and Zelle Payments. Order medications online from the best online pharmacy in the USA Here.

WE OFFER MONEY BACK GUARANTEE TO EVERYONE PURCHASING MEDICINES FROM US YOU CAN LOOK AT SOME FEW QUESTIONS THAT HAVE BEEN ANSWERED TO BACK THIS POINT HERE

If your package is not delivered to you because of our error, we will offer you a reshipment. We will ship a similar request for nothing out of your pocket. Inform us quickly in that regard so we solve the issue.

Buy Vyvanse Online HERE Now and have it delivered right at your doorsteps. Oxy Best Pharmacy is the best and secure place to order painkillers online. Customer satisfaction is our highest priority, and we never fail to exceed the customer’s expectations! Contact Oxy Best Pharmacy today for all of your meds. Order Vyvanse online and other highly controlled pills like BOTOX, MORPHINE, CODEINE, DIAZEPAM DILAUDID, SUBUTEX, FENTANYL PATCHES, XANAX, NEUROBLOC, OXYCODONE, OXYCONTIN, OPANA, ROXICODONE, SUBOXONE, OXYNORM AND RITALIN Online without Prescription. You are always welcome to our pharmacy at any time to enjoy from our best online services feel free to contact our pharmacy HERE

 

 

Scoop.it!

HIPAA Police –Are They Coming For You?

HIPAA Police –Are They Coming For You? | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

As reported by Health and Human Services (HHS) HIPAA fines and audits are significantly on the rise. 5% of practices are being audited against the HITECH Act and Omnibus Rule. Are you compliant?

 

“How do all these regulations affect me as a Healthcare Covered Entity or Business Associate?”

To answer that question, let’s first look at what the regulations are and get a brief description. Once we read and understand what we are facing, the steps to complying with the rules should be attainable. I would love to say attaining compliance is easy, but with anything in life, if you want success you will have to work for it.

 

HITECH ACT

The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH Act) was created to motivate the implementation of electronic health records (EHR) and supporting technology in the United States. President Obama signed HITECH into law on February 17, 2009, as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA).

 

The HITECH act specified that by the beginning of 2011, healthcare providers would be given monetary incentives for being able to demonstrate Meaningful Use (MU) of electronic health records (EHR). These monetary incentives, up to $44,000 per doctor, will be offered until 2016, after which time penalties will be levied for failing to demonstrate such use.

 

FYI, the main failure that the centers for Medicare and Medicaid have discovered when auditing providers who have implemented an EHR system is their failure to perform a proper Risk Analysis.

 

OMNIBUS RULE

The United States Government’s requirement to implement Electronic Medical Records and Health IT compliance has prompted the US Government to adopt the long-awaited HIPAA Omnibus Rule http://compliancy-group.com/hipaa-omnibus-rule

The Omnibus Rule was finalized by the Office for Civil Rights (OCR). The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approved the final rule and subsequently published it in the Federal Register.

 

The rule effectively merges four separate rulemakings, which are as follows:

  • Amendments to HIPAA Privacy and Security rules requirements;
  • HIPAA and HIPAA HITECH under one rule now
  • Further requirements for data breach notifications and penalty enforcements
  • Approving the regulations in regards to the HITECH Act’s breach notification rule

 

It is apparent for this new rule that the health care industry will need to educate patients with regards to their privacy and disclosure rights. Patients will need to know how their information is used and disclosed, and how to submit complaints pertaining to privacy violations. Health Care providers should also try to better understand HIPAA requirements so that they are aware of their risks and responsibilities towards their patients.

 

In addition, the Omnibus Rule includes provisions that would govern the use of patient information in marketing; eliminates and modifies the “harm threshold” provision that presently allows healthcare providers to refrain from reporting data breaches that are deemed not harmful; ensures that business associates and subcontractors are liable for their own breaches and requires Business Associates to comply with HIPAA for the first time since HIPAA was first introduced. The rule also requires HIPAA privacy and security requirements to be employed by business associates and sub-contractors.

 

So, what does compliance with these rules look like? Is it a 3-ring binder on a shelf with some policies, is it an online training course, or is it my IT person telling me I am protected? Actually, it is a little of all three.

  1. RISK ANALYSIS– A true risk analysis covering Administrative, (Policies and Procedures), Technical, (How are your Network, Computers, Routers, protected), Physical, What safeguards have you put into place at your location? (Alarms, Shredding, Screen Protectors).
  2. RISK MANAGEMENT- The risk analysis is going to identify deficiencies. Risk Management is then put in place to track how your remediation plan will work to fix the deficiencies that were found during the Risk Analysis.
  3. VENDOR MANAGEMENT– Vendor Management tracks the companies and people that access your site where PHI or ePHI is stored and keeps track of who you share PHI or ePHI with. Depending on the relationship, you will want to have either a Business Associate Agreement (if they meet the requirements for being labeled a Business Associate) or a Confidentiality Agreement. Remember, for Business Associates, an agreement alone is not enough; you also need assurances that they are complying with the HIPAA Security Rule before you share or continue to share PHI or ePHI with them.
  4. DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT– It is hard to imagine compliance without a place to store policies, procedures, business associate agreements, or any other compliance documents. Why you ask? Because the rule specifically states that you must retain all compliance documents for a min of 6 years (depending on the state your business is in these rules may be more stringent).

5. TRAINING OF YOUR STAFF– One of the most important aspects of compliance is the tracking of not only HIPAA 101 training for your staff but also of your staff’s acknowledgment that they understand the HIPAA Privacy and Security Policies that you

 
 
Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

mark's curator insight, May 3, 1:20 PM
Oxy Best Pharmacy, ship and do home delivery World Wide

BUY VYVANSE ONLINE, can be a smart move. It saves you money many times, as you remove the cost of a physical retailer. Online prices for medications are almost always lower, and when it comes to medications you require, any savings you can get can really help. You’ll often have to buy these medications regularly, and those costs can really add up. So buy drugs online gives you an opportunity to save a little time for you to buy will add up to substantial savings in time as you buy from home you need not take a drive to a pharmacy. If you want to buy Vyvanse online, then you’ve come to the right place visit Our Shop Page. To buy this medication from us you do not need a prescription and also it will be good if you have one as it will be way easy to make delivery without doing much on security. We’ll get the drug to you quickly, safely and you will pay online prices that easily beat out what you would pay at a physical pharmacy.

Why Us?

Payment methods: We take Western Union Money Gram, Bitcoin, Cashapp, and Zelle Payments. Order medications online from the best online pharmacy in the USA Here.

WE OFFER MONEY BACK GUARANTEE TO EVERYONE PURCHASING MEDICINES FROM US YOU CAN LOOK AT SOME FEW QUESTIONS THAT HAVE BEEN ANSWERED TO BACK THIS POINT HERE

If your package is not delivered to you because of our error, we will offer you a reshipment. We will ship a similar request for nothing out of your pocket. Inform us quickly in that regard so we solve the issue.

Buy Vyvanse Online HERE Now and have it delivered right at your doorsteps. Oxy Best Pharmacy is the best and secure place to order painkillers online. Customer satisfaction is our highest priority, and we never fail to exceed the customer’s expectations! Contact Oxy Best Pharmacy today for all of your meds. Order Vyvanse online and other highly controlled pills like BOTOX, MORPHINE, CODEINE, DIAZEPAM DILAUDID, SUBUTEX, FENTANYL PATCHES, XANAX, NEUROBLOC, OXYCODONE, OXYCONTIN, OPANA, ROXICODONE, SUBOXONE, OXYNORM AND RITALIN Online without Prescription. You are always welcome to our pharmacy at any time to enjoy from our best online services feel free to contact our pharmacy HERE

 

 

Scoop.it!

HIPAA liability protections: business associate agreements are must for effective risk management

HIPAA liability protections: business associate agreements are must for effective risk management | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

The first step for a physician, known under the language of HIPAA as a “covered entity,” is to determine the need for a BAA with a vendor. A vendor is considered a “business associate” under HIPAA if the vendor creates, receives, maintains, or transmits patient health information (PHI) on the provider’s behalf.

 

Common services performed by a business associate (BA) include claims processing, data analysis, quality assurance, billing and collection, practice management, legal, accounting, and consulting.

 

Entities that only serve as conduits, such as the post office or Internet service providers, are not considered BAs even though they handle patient information.

 

What BAs must include

If a business associate is providing services to a covered entity, the parties must enter into a written BAA that:

 

  • establishes the permitted uses/disclosures of PHI,
  • stipulates that the BA must use appropriate safeguards to prevent unauthorized PHI uses and disclosures,
  • spells out that the BA reports to the covered entity any unauthorized uses and disclosures,
  • extends the terms of the BAA to its subcontracts, and
  • establishes that upon termination of the BAA, the vendor must either return or destroy all PHI.

 

The consequences of not having a written BAA can be severe. The Office of Civil Rights (OCR) could request a copy of a covered entity’s BAA if there is a complaint registered over a covered entity or if a breach occurs.

 

Violations under HIPAA can be penalized at anywhere between $100 to $50,000 per violation, up to a calendar year maximum penalty of $1,500,000 for a single violation. The OCR could take the position that every day that the BA and covered entity did not have a business associate agreement is a violation, and multiply the fine by the number of days no BAA penalty was in place, so the penalties can be steep.

 

Liability of agents

Under HIPAA, a covered entity is liable for the acts of its agents, which can include a BA.

 

Whether an agency relationship exists is determined case by case, with the essential factor being whether the provider has the right or authority to control the BA’s conduct. The authority of a provider to give instructions or directions is the control that can result in an agency relationship.

 

The language in the BAA will be considered in determining whether an agency relationship is present. If a covered entity is controlling the performance of its BA, the covered entity should closely monitor the BA’s performance since the covered entity will be held accountable for its performance.

 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Case Management and HIPAA information

Case Management and HIPAA information | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

An employee of the Iowa’s Mahaska County government alleged that another employee committed a HIPAA violation when she locked a member of the public inside a building where files containing PHI were stored unsecured, the Oskaloosa News reported.

 

Kim Newendorp, general assistant director for Mahaska County, told the Board of Supervisors this month that a fellow county employee had locked a member of the public in the Annex Building and left that person alone in the facility.

 

“This person was waiting for me, but in doing so, she left all of the case management confidential and HIPAA information unlocked and accessible to that person. This is a HIPAA violation,” Newendorp told the board.

 

Newendorp said she notified her boss, one of the board members, about the incident but received no response. She then spoke with the county’s chief privacy officer, Jim Blomgren, who passed information about the incident on to the company that handles human resources for the county. No action was taken.

 

Newendorp said that she filed an official grievance with the Board of Supervisors, who passed it onto Blomgren, who then passed it on to the HR people, again with no result.

 

“I’m disappointed this situation has not been handled,” she told the board. “Especially due to the importance of HIPAA. The state DHS official has come forward to say that this situation is an issue, and yet nothing has been done.”

 

“I understand this topic may not be as important to you as roads, 911, and the airport, but I can tell you that the people’s right to have their personal information locked and secured is important to the hundreds of past clients of Mahaska County Case Management, and their families and myself.”

 

Willie Van Weelden, chairman of the Mahaska County Board of Supervisors, said he took action at the time, but declined to say what he specifically did to address Newendorp’s concerns.

Oskaloosa News asked Blomgren to comment on Newendorp’s testimony. “Since the comments of the employee at the meeting of the Board of Supervisors involves personnel issues and alleged HIPAA infractions I do not believe I am at liberty to discuss them,” he responded.

 

“I think in most counties, the board of supervisors, you would never do an investigation into HIPAA. You would never do a human resources investigation. No county I know of would have their board do that,” Paul Greufe of PJ Greufe & Associates told Oskaloosa News.

 

Greufe said that most counties hire professional services such as his to do the HR work and would direct those people to start an investigation. “And so that was the process that was followed to the letter.”

SIMILAR INCIDENT IN BOSTON RESULTS IN OCR REPORT

The incident alleged by Newendorp is similar to one that occurred at the Boston Healthcare for the Homeless Program (BHCHP) earlier this year. In that case, someone was not let into the facililty unattended but broke in.

 

There was unsecured PHI in the facility, but no evidence that the PHI was viewed by the intruder. Still, BHCHP did notify people affected about the incident and reported it to OCR. 

 

The unsecured PHI included handwritten staff notes, printed patient lists, referral forms, and insurance/benefits applications. BHCHP told OCR that 861 individuals were affected by the breach.

BHCHP said it conducted an internal investigation that included a search of the clinic to which the intruder would have had access and interviews with clinic and shelter staff.

 

The program also ensured that the clinic door was secure and implemented additional safety measures, including an additional lock on internal doors within the clinic and secure storage of keys to internal doors, file cabinets, and storage cabinets.

 

BHCHP also updated its policies governing how staff use and store patient information.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

HIPAA Compliant Data Backup Service

HIPAA Compliant Data Backup Service | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it
How to find a HIPAA compliant Data Backup Service

Nowadays you have to make prudent decisions while purchasing a practice management system, a user-friendly EHR, and also while choosing the type of computer the practice staff will use. It is common for us to think of data backup in terms of a hard drive or an external storage. But it is important to note that you are dealing with sensitive personal health data and you should ensure that the data is not lost in case of an emergency. Since HIPAA compliant data backup is mandatory, it is a good idea to hire a data backup service.

 

First of all make sure the Data Backup Service Vendor is HIPAA compliant, which means they comply with HIPAA Security Rules. These rules require the vendor to have in place four safeguards.  As per the Office of the National Coordinator for ONC (Health Information Technology) these safeguards help the medical practice to prevent some of the common security gaps which could lead to data loss and cyber-attack. The four safeguards are detailed as follows:

 

  1. Physical Safeguards – These safeguards deal with infrastructure factors such as secure access areas, locks and protection against unauthorized entry into the ePHI (electronic protected health information) systems. It also provides security for the building that stores the information from environmental or natural hazards. Make sure your vendor has policies, procedures and technology to control access to ePHI.
  2. Administrative Safeguards – The policies, actions and procedures of administrative safeguards assist in the detection and prevention of security violations associated with any ePHI. These safeguards conduct security risk analysis and takes action to decrease identified risks.
  3. Organizational Standards – The vendor must be a “covered entity” with contracts or arrangement with other business associates that can access the ePHI when needed.
  4. Policies and Procedures – The vendor must maintain security policies and procedures in writing for at least six years (from the date of creation or the last effective date, whichever is later). The written policies and procedures must be reviewed and updated from time to time, as per the organizational or environmental changes that might impact the security of ePHI.This is mandated in the Office of the National Coordinator’s Guide to Privacy and Security of Electronic Health Information dated April 2015. You should also be aware that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services made use of HITECH (Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act) to support the HIPAA privacy and security rules.

 

Best Practices for Data Backup and Recovery

 

The data backup service should have a data backup plan, plan for emergency-mode operation and a disaster recovery plan to comply with HIPAA. The combination of these three plans would reassure the capabilities, policies and procedures of the provider to restore health information if an emergency occurs. This will give peace of mind to the medical practice and result in uninterrupted work.

 

How a Backup Service Provider can offer more help

 

A good HIPAA compliant vendor can offer additional benefits such as offsite data storage in case of power blackout, natural disaster or malware attack. The use of automatic data backup leaves you with no worries about backing up data periodically at your office. Several vendors also provide cloud based data systems to store different versions of files at different locations to provide additional protection in physical form and this is known as ‘data redundancy’.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:

Contact Details :
inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com/tdr

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Five common mistakes and how to avoid them for 2015 HIPAA audits

Five common mistakes and how to avoid them for 2015 HIPAA audits | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

2014 saw a rise in data breaches and HIPAA compliance failures within the healthcare industry. The Office for Civil Rights (OCR) takes privacy and security seriously, and more organizations have been fined for failure to comply with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). This year, the OCR will use the HIPAA audit program to randomly assess healthcare entities and business associates for compliance with the HIPAA privacy, security and breach notification rules. Here are five mistakes to avoid:  

  1. Failure to keep up with regulatory requirements

Gain a better understanding of specifications for standards as “required” versus “addressable.” Some covered entities must comply with every Security Rule standard. Covered entities must determine if the addressable section is reasonable after a risk assessment, and, if not, the Security Rule allows them to adopt an alternative measure. Be sure to document everything, particularly since the OCR may look at encryption with audits this year.  

  1. No documented security program

The OCR wants to know how you implement a security risk assessment program, so be sure your organization has a documented security awareness program. Once you know the requirements, assess your environment and your users. Does your organization have a security and compliance program in place? How well is it implemented? Who is involved? How often do you communicate? Everyone in your organization should be held responsible for ensuring the safety of data and following proper procedures. Have a plan and a point person in place, and ensure your compliance and security teams talk to each other. Create a committee with stakeholders and clear responsibility, and make sure the plan is documented, communicated and enforced across the organization.

  1. A reactive approach to audits

Once you establish a security program, proactively monitor security and performance indicators, as OCR audits will focus heavily on breach plans and the controls you have in place to protect them. Auditors will look for access to critical group memberships, so make sure you’re auditing and reporting on user activity – including your privileged users. Auditors are increasingly more interested in this area, due to the recent increase in insider incidents.

  1. Assumptions regarding business associates agreements

Contractors and subcontractors who process health insurance claims are liable for the protection of private patient information. Make sure you have an updated business associate agreement in place, and ensure the chain of responsibility is documented, agreed upon, and reviewed frequently by both parties. You can find sample contracts offered by the OCR to help you through this process. 

  1. A checkbox approach to compliance

Regulators want to discontinue the checkbox approach to compliance in favor of a risk-based security approach. Compliance and security must go hand-in-hand, and organizations will benefit from incorporating this mindset across both teams. Strong security measures make it easier to meet compliance regulations. By adopting an organizational self-discovery approach, you will have a higher level of visibility and awareness of internal issues, and achieve a more resilient business process and the next level of organizational maturity.


No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

HIPAA Audits Are Still on Hold

HIPAA Audits Are Still on Hold | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

`The unit of the Department of Health and Human Services that enforces HIPAA still has plenty of work to do before it can launch its long-promised next round of HIPAA compliance audits, as planned for this year.

The HHS Office for Civil Rights has yet to develop a revised protocol for conducting the audits, OCR Director Jocelyn Samuels revealed during a Jan. 13 media briefing.


Samuels declined to offer a timeline for when OCR plans to resume its HIPAA audits, which Samuels says will include covered entities as well as business associates, who are now directly liable for HIPAA compliance under the HIPAA Omnibus Rule.

Early in 2014, OCR officials said the agency expected to resume compliance audits of covered entities in the fall of 2014, later expanding the program to include audits of business associates based on those vendors identified by covered entities in pre-audit surveys.

Then in September, OCR officials said the audit launch was stalled because of a delay in the rollout of technology to collect audit-related documents from covered entities and business associates.

In her comments Jan. 13, Samuels did not offer an explanation for the prolonged delay in resumption of HIPAA audits.

"OCR is committed to implementing an effective audit program, and audits will be an important compliance tool for OCR," Samuels said. The audits "will enable OCR to identify best practices and proactively uncover risks and vulnerabilities, like our other enforcement tools, such as complaints and compliance reviews; provide a proactive and systematic means to assess and improve industry compliance; enhance industry awareness of compliance obligations; and enable OCR to target its outreach and technical assistance to identified problems and to offer tools to the industry for self-evaluation and prevention. Organizations should continue to monitor the OCR website for future announcements on the program."

In 2012, OCR conducted a pilot HIPAA audit program for 115 covered entities that was carried out by a contractor, the consulting firm KPMG. It also issued an audit protocol offering a detailed breakdown of what was reviewed. OCR is revising the protocol to reflect changes brought by the HIPAA Omnibus Rule.

Rules In the Works

In addition to the pending audits, other HIPAA-related activities under way at OCR for 2015 include:

  • A final version of a proposed rule HHS issued last January to permit certain covered entities, including state agencies, to disclose to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System the identities of persons prohibited by federal law from possessing or receiving a firearm for reasons related to mental health;
  • An advanced notice of proposed rulemaking related to a HITECH Act mandate for HHS to develop a methodology to distribute a percentage of monetary settlements and penalties collected by OCR to individuals affected by breaches and other HIPAA violations;
  • A possible request for additional public input on OCR's proposed accounting of disclosures rule making. Samuels says OCR is still evaluating the comments it received on the proposed accounting of disclosures rule it issued in 2011, as well as recommendations from the HIT Policy Committee about refining the rule.

In a statement provided to Information Security Media Group, Samuels noted, "The [accounting of disclosures] rulemaking is still listed as a long-term action on our last published regulatory agenda. We are exploring ways to further solicit public input on this important issue."

OCR in May 2011 issued a notice of proposed rulemaking for updating accounting of disclosures requirements under HIPAA. The proposal generated hundreds of complaints from healthcare providers and others. Many of the complaints were aimed at a controversial "access report" provision. As proposed, the access report would need to contain the date and time of access to electronic records, the name of the person or entity accessing protected health information, and a description of the information and user action, such as whether information was created, modified or deleted. The proposal would also provide patients with the right for an accounting of disclosures of electronic PHI made up to three years prior to the request.

Other Enforcement Activities

OCR also has a number of other enforcement activities planned for 2015, Samuels said in the Jan. 13 briefing.

"We will continue to identify and bring to resolution high impact cases that send strong enforcement messages to the industry about compliance," she said. "These types of cases can include the lack of a comprehensive risk analysis and risk management practices, ignoring identified threats and hazards to systems containing electronic protected health information, and insufficient policies and procedures, and training of workforce members."

OCR also expects to provide policy clarification for a variety of topics, including cloud computing and the "minimum necessary" rule, which HHS says is based on the premise that protected health information should only be used or disclosed if it is necessary to satisfy a particular purpose or carry out a function.

"We will also continue dialogues with our stakeholders about issues on which they would like additional interpretation," Samuels says.


No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

HIPAA Privacy During Emergency Situations

A patient arrives at your facility with Ebola-like symptoms. After taking the necessary precautions, you run the requisite tests, conduct a patient interview, and determine that in fact the patient has contracted the Ebola virus. You also learn that the symptoms have been present for a couple of days, but like many people, the patient delayed seeking treatment until the symptoms got worse. After questioning the patient, you discover that since returning from West Africa one week earlier, the patient has returned to work, visited with family, attended church, and been shopping at the local mall, all while exhibiting symptoms. Thus, hundreds of people living in the community have potentially been exposed. What do you do? What information can you release to the public? Do you need the patient's consent to warn the public about the potential exposure?


The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Civil Rights ("OCR"), the entity responsible for overseeing compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 ("HIPAA"), recently issued guidance on how to address HIPAA privacy in emergency situations, such as the one described above. Importantly, while there are a number of ways in which protected health information can be shared in an emergency situation, you should keep in mind that theprotections of HIPAA are not set aside during an emergency. Thus, while it is important to alert the public to the potential exposure, it must be done in a manner that is compliant with HIPAA. HIPAA, however, does provide several mechanisms through which information may be released...


No comment yet.