HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices
73.9K views | +30 today
Follow
HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices
HIPAA Compliance and HIPAA Risk management Articles, Tips and Updates for Medical Practices and Physicians
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scoop.it!

The Benefits of HIPAA Compliance Services for Physicians

The Benefits of HIPAA Compliance Services for Physicians | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

As a doctor, you have your hands full just taking care of your many patients, running a practice, and providing quality healthcare service. The last thing you need to worry about is whether your practice is being managed properly when it comes to Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) compliance.

 

HIPAA regulations can be complex – at least to an inexperienced or understaffed office management team – and there’s no margin of error for unintended breaches that can lead to costly penalties. That’s why it’s important that your practice utilizes professional HIPAA compliance services that offer these key benefits:

Protection against rampant data breaches

HIPAA data breaches happen at an alarming rate. Employee carelessness is a major contributing factor.  According to the HIPAA JournalData breaches caused by employee carelessness have increased year on year. More unencrypted devices are being lost, data still is being inadvertently disclosed, and simple email errors are still being made. Performing regular training on data privacy and security can help to reduce the number of data breaches suffered.”

 

To reduce – if not eliminate – your risk, you may need on-site compliance experts who are not only able to answer your questions at every step during the process, but who can educate and empower your workforce. These experts can provide real-time advice for best practices for securely handling protected health information, protecting patient privacy, and understandinghow to avoid potential breaches.

A customized HIPAA risk management plan

No two practices are alike. Which is why your HIPAA risk management plan must be unique for your practice. Look for a compliance service provider with decades of experience in internal investigations, regulatory compliance, inspection, facility security, risk mitigation, and health information technology can give your practice an invaluable preventative edge.

Supporting evidence that your practice is exercising due diligence

The greater your medical practice can demonstrate its efforts to exercise reasonable diligence to mitigate risk, the greater your chances of avoiding civil monetary penalties. In the event of a breach of electronic medical records, or if your practice is subjected to a HIPAA compliance investigation, your compliance services provider can provide assistance in sufficiently answering any questions the HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR) may ask about your compliance program.

 

Colington Consulting takes the uncertainty out of what is reasonable and appropriate for HIPAA compliance for your practice. We provide HIPAA risk assessments and on-site facility security surveys by our team of experts. Unlike other service providers that use web-based formats and expect you to answer questions you can hardly understand, we always conduct the assessment, value your input, and use a common-sense approach to compliance.

 

We are experts in the field of HIPAA rules and procedures. Colington Consulting can help you avoid problems and steep fines by bringing your practice into complete HIPAA compliance. It is what we do best, allowing you to do what you do best … provide health care to your patients.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
bizconnect's comment, April 24, 7:53 AM
Nice information.
Scoop.it!

Recent Ransomware Attacks Could be HIPAA Violations

Recent Ransomware Attacks Could be HIPAA Violations | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it
By now, you may have heard about the massive ransomware attack that has struck over 150 countries, including The United States, over the past week.
 
If health care data taken hostage in a ransomware attack is unencrypted, it could constitute a HIPAA violation. Any electronic protected health information (ePHI) that is affected by a breach without proper encryption methods in place is very likely to be compromised in the event of a ransomware attack.
 
These recent attacks come out of a growing trend in malware incidents over the past year. OCR has released guidance about how to handle a ransomware incident in your health care practice. The federal government has stressed the importance of safeguarding your organization and protecting your confidential patient data.
 
 
If you’re interested in protecting your organization from a ransomware incident–and want education about how to prevent ransomware attacks from spawning HIPAA breaches and fines–attend the upcoming webinar.
Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

New HIPAA requirements target unsecured protected health information

New HIPAA requirements target unsecured protected health information | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, signed by President Barack Obama in February, modified the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). In particular, the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH) sets forth new requirements relating to business associates and notification of patients regarding breaches of unsecured protected health information. The new regulation covers breaches that occur after September 23, 2009.

 

Before HITECH, a covered entity, that is, a physician's office, hospital, clinic, etc.—only was required to mitigate the effects of an unauthorized disclosure, which may or may not have included notifying the patient Now, except for certain limited exceptions, a covered entity is required to notify a patient of an unauthorized disclosure of unsecured protected health information if a significant risk of "financial, reputational, or other" harm exists.

 

It is important to note that notification is only required for unsecured protected health information, not secured protected health information. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued guidance on what constitutes "secured" protected health information in April, stating that information is deemed secured if rendered "unusable, unreadable, or indecipherable" to unauthorized individuals.

 

To determine whether a "significant risk of harm" exists, the covered entity should consider what information was disclosed, to whom the information was disclosed, and what steps have been taken to eliminate or reduce the risk to the individual.

 

Any notification to the patient must include a brief description of what happened and the type of protected health information disclosed, any steps the patient should take to protect himself or herself, what the covered entity is doing to investigate and mitigate the breach, and information concerning who to contact for additional information. Any required notification must occur without unreasonable delay but no more than 60 days after the breach is discovered or should have been discovered with the exercise of reasonable diligence.

 

Notification must be in writing by mail (or by phone in urgent cases) or electronic means if the patient has consented to electronic notification. Also, specific rules exist regarding what to do if patients cannot be located. If a breach involves more than 500 patients—for instance, the loss of a laptop containing unsecured protected health information, then local media outlets must be notified. In addition, the HHS secretary must be notified—immediately for breaches involving more than 500 patients and annually for others.

 

With the new regulations, the knowledge of a covered entity's agents, including business associates, is imputed to the covered entity. Therefore, the clock for notifying patients could begin to run before the covered entity actually is aware of the disclosure. New agreements may be required, and education of business associates is important, to ensure that they are aware of these requirements and that they indemnify your practice if they fail to comply with the new rules and notify you promptly of any breach of protected health information.

 

The burden to disclose the breach or establish that no risk of harm to the patient exists is on the covered entity, even if the breach was the fault of one of its agents. A decision not to notify a patient because the covered entity does not believe that a significant risk of harm exists should be carefully investigated and documented.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Texas Expands HIPAA Privacy Laws to Bolster EHR Security

Texas Expands HIPAA Privacy Laws to Bolster EHR Security | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Governor of Texas, Rick Perry, has signed a new law to give Texas residents even greater protection than required by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and has increased penalties for healthcare organizations that fail to implement the appropriate security measures to protect the health data of patients.

 

Under the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH), covered entities have a number of responsibilities including reporting data breaches to the Office for Civil Rights (OCR). Data breaches are reportable to the OCR, either in an end of year report or after an investigation, depending on the number of individuals affected.

 

HIPAA places a number of restrictions on how ePHI is used and stored, and all covered entities are required to conduct a full risk analysis to assess systems for security vulnerabilities to allow risk to be managed. It also lays down the procedures that must be followed after a data breach, such as notifying potential victims. Covered organizations are also required to conduct an investigation into how a breach occurred as well as a risk of harm analysis.

 

One of the main aims of HIPAA has been to improve the standard of data security and protect the privacy of patients. HIPAA and HITECH can be seen as minimum standards that must be followed, and states are allowed to increase data security rules, provided that all HIPAA requirements are met.

 

Texas has now exercised the right to tighten state privacy laws to ensure electronic Protected Health Information is kept private and confidential.

 

Greater Protection for Texas Residents
The new Texas law follows HITECH, although it makes a number of amendments to further restrict the use of ePHI. The penalties have been increased for wrongful disclosure, breach notifications have been updated and healthcare organizations must provide more training to staff. A new requirement is that data privacy and security training must now be provided to employees every two years. Training courses must be documented and all attendees must sign to confirm that they have received training. A 60-day time restriction has also now applies for providing new employees with training.

 

According to the new law, “an individual’s PHI may not be disclosed without the patient’s authorization, except for purposes of treatment, payment, healthcare operations, insurance purposes, and as otherwise authorized by state or federal law”

 

Harsher Penalties for Wrongful Disclosure of ePHI
Failure to comply with the new legislation will result in increased financial penalties and possibly criminal penalties – the theft of ePHI is now considered a felony – being applied for the wrongful disclosure of ePHI. The state is also able to revoke both professional and institutional licenses. Financial penalties have been increased to a maximum of $250,000 for intentional disclosure of ePHI for financial gain, $25,000 for intentional or knowing violation and $5,000 for each individual negligent violation, although the maximum penalty for repeat offenders is $1.5 million and enforced withdrawal from Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program and other state funded healthcare initiatives is also a possibility.

 

When assessing violations, the seriousness of the data breach will be considered along with significant risk of harm, past history of the organization, certification, the efforts made to mitigate any damage caused and the amount necessary to deter the organization from allowing further violations to occur. Failure to issue breach notifications to affected individuals will also be penalized at a rate of $100 per day, per individual, up to a maximum fine of $250,000.

 

HIPAA regulations require employers to provide training on data Privacy and Security Rules, although this is only required within a short time frame of the commencement of employment and after a material change in Privacy and security policies. Under the new Texas law there is a requirement for ongoing training to be provided to staff and this must also be tailored to the employee’s position within the company. Rules have also changed on breach notifications to include all HIPAA covered entities including business associates, as well as non HIPAA-covered entities that wrongfully disclose ePHI.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Important HIPAA Compliance Issues in 2018

Important HIPAA Compliance Issues in 2018 | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

As 2018 gets underway, experts offer advice on some important issues related to HIPAA compliance. One issue is patient access to medical records. Kathy Downing, vice president of information governance and standards at the American Health Information Management Association, said her organization receives many complaints from patients who have issues receiving medical information even though right of access has been in place since 2003.This area is what Downing calls “super low-hanging fruit on the HIPAA tree.” If patients request records, there is no need to make them wait 30 days. If the records are stored electronically, practices should allow patients to receive their information in that format.

 

“The reason this is important is because in a lot of the cases, patients may be seeing multiple providers for chronic conditions, and having their chart allows them to be more engaged in their care,” she said. “It's an important patient right, and important for population health and patient engagement.”

 

By giving patients their records, providers are also allowing them to do a quality review to ensure their information is correct. Electronic medical records commonly contain errors, mainly because of copying and pasting of data, Downing said.

 

If physicians are uncomfortable talking with patients about information in their charts, she recommends that practices appoint a nurse who can deal with patient queries. Portals can also be a good resource to guide patients through their information. If someone has been diagnosed with prediabetes, for instance, a portal can provide links to trusted online sources that can answer patient questions.

 

Increased enforcement?


Another HIPAA-related question facing medical practices this year is the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) approach to HIPAA enforcement. Michael Bossenbroek, a partner at Wachler & Associates, P.C. in Royal Oak, Michigan, listened to remarks at a HIPAA conference last fall from the new OCR director. OCR might be striking a different tone as a new administration takes the reins. “How they balance the objectives of education and compliance with enforcement remains to be seen,” Bossenbroek said.

 

The OCR director gave no specifics, Bossenbroek said. Whatever approach emerges from OCR, as before, providers need to ensure they have the basics completed, with a risk analysis performed and solid policies and procedures in place.

 

Chris Apgar, CEO and president of Apgar & Associates LLC, in Portland, Oregon, said OCR has made it clear there will be continued enforcement activity in the coming years. No one is immune from them, he said. He recently worked with a small entity that had their wrists slapped by OCR. He helped them prepare a response, and when they failed to follow through with their plan, he had to mediate between the organization and OCR.

 

“If you respond to OCR in an appropriate and timely manner and follow through, they go away,” he said. “If you don't, they stick around. They are not going away.”

 

Shortage of security talent


Health care organizations will continue to face a shortage of information technology (IT) security talent in 2018, Apgar said. A report released this past summer by the US Department of Health and Human Services found that 3 out of 4 hospitals do not have a designated information technology (IT) security professional.

 

Larger organizations are better able than small groups to afford hiring IT talent, which can be expensive, Apgar said. But smaller organizations, which often delegate IT security to office staff who are already busy with other tasks, have options. Apgar recommends looking for students graduating from information security programs and bringing them on board as interns. Small groups do not require the same kinds of security setup that a Cleveland Clinic or Kaiser might need, and young individuals can help build and run systems. Organizations can grow a position with them when they are new in the field, although these individuals could leave when they become seasoned and expect a higher salary.


Vendors


With OCR increasingly scrutinizing and auditing business associates, it is important for practitioners to ensure their vendors are compliant. Apgar said the vendors he works with are increasingly motivated to do this for fear of losing customers. These customers – health care practitioners – are demanding proof of compliance.

 

To better understand a vendor's compliance, providers can request policies and procedures and ask to see their risk analysis and any other pertinent documentation. Some ask that vendors fill out a security questionnaire. Others go even further. Groups like Apgar's company can act as a third party to conduct a risk assessment, then attest in writing that a vendor has either mitigated or accepted risks found in the analysis.

 

New tools


It used to cost anywhere from $75,000 to $100,000 for a tool that would automatically monitor audit logs and send alerts if an anomaly is found for a hospital or larger clinic, Apgar said. Over the past couple of years, new options have hit the market that lowered the cost to $35,000 or less, which is a game changer for HIPAA compliance, he said.

 

“As more technology becomes affordable, there is a higher likelihood that regulatory bodies will push back and say providers have to use it,” Agar said. “If a hospital is generating and not regularly reviewing audit logs, they will look negligent to regulators.”

 

Technology tends to move with the needs of the market. For instance, as cyber crime has become increasingly prevalent, tools have been developed and marketed to prevent attacks. Some tools look both internally and externally in a network to see if unusual behavior is occurring, and sends an alert if any anomaly is found.

 

Keeping track of technology as it becomes more affordable is not always simple. Apgar said providers can look at IT newsletters and check with their state associations to stay atop of new and affordable tools coming on the market.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Case Management and HIPAA information

Case Management and HIPAA information | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

An employee of the Iowa’s Mahaska County government alleged that another employee committed a HIPAA violation when she locked a member of the public inside a building where files containing PHI were stored unsecured, the Oskaloosa News reported.

 

Kim Newendorp, general assistant director for Mahaska County, told the Board of Supervisors this month that a fellow county employee had locked a member of the public in the Annex Building and left that person alone in the facility.

 

“This person was waiting for me, but in doing so, she left all of the case management confidential and HIPAA information unlocked and accessible to that person. This is a HIPAA violation,” Newendorp told the board.

 

Newendorp said she notified her boss, one of the board members, about the incident but received no response. She then spoke with the county’s chief privacy officer, Jim Blomgren, who passed information about the incident on to the company that handles human resources for the county. No action was taken.

 

Newendorp said that she filed an official grievance with the Board of Supervisors, who passed it onto Blomgren, who then passed it on to the HR people, again with no result.

 

“I’m disappointed this situation has not been handled,” she told the board. “Especially due to the importance of HIPAA. The state DHS official has come forward to say that this situation is an issue, and yet nothing has been done.”

 

“I understand this topic may not be as important to you as roads, 911, and the airport, but I can tell you that the people’s right to have their personal information locked and secured is important to the hundreds of past clients of Mahaska County Case Management, and their families and myself.”

 

Willie Van Weelden, chairman of the Mahaska County Board of Supervisors, said he took action at the time, but declined to say what he specifically did to address Newendorp’s concerns.

Oskaloosa News asked Blomgren to comment on Newendorp’s testimony. “Since the comments of the employee at the meeting of the Board of Supervisors involves personnel issues and alleged HIPAA infractions I do not believe I am at liberty to discuss them,” he responded.

 

“I think in most counties, the board of supervisors, you would never do an investigation into HIPAA. You would never do a human resources investigation. No county I know of would have their board do that,” Paul Greufe of PJ Greufe & Associates told Oskaloosa News.

 

Greufe said that most counties hire professional services such as his to do the HR work and would direct those people to start an investigation. “And so that was the process that was followed to the letter.”

SIMILAR INCIDENT IN BOSTON RESULTS IN OCR REPORT

The incident alleged by Newendorp is similar to one that occurred at the Boston Healthcare for the Homeless Program (BHCHP) earlier this year. In that case, someone was not let into the facililty unattended but broke in.

 

There was unsecured PHI in the facility, but no evidence that the PHI was viewed by the intruder. Still, BHCHP did notify people affected about the incident and reported it to OCR. 

 

The unsecured PHI included handwritten staff notes, printed patient lists, referral forms, and insurance/benefits applications. BHCHP told OCR that 861 individuals were affected by the breach.

BHCHP said it conducted an internal investigation that included a search of the clinic to which the intruder would have had access and interviews with clinic and shelter staff.

 

The program also ensured that the clinic door was secure and implemented additional safety measures, including an additional lock on internal doors within the clinic and secure storage of keys to internal doors, file cabinets, and storage cabinets.

 

BHCHP also updated its policies governing how staff use and store patient information.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Hospitals Fail at HIPAA Compliance Re Medical Records Requests

Hospitals Fail at HIPAA Compliance Re Medical Records Requests | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Many hospitals failed at HIPAA compliance in response to simulated patients’ requests for medical records, according to a study by Yale researchers published in the JAMA Network Open.

 

The researchers surveyed 83 top-ranked US hospitals with independent medical records request processes and medical records departments reachable by telephone.

 

According to HIPAA, patient requests for medical record must be fulfilled within 30 days of receipt in the format requested by the patient if the records are readily producible in that format. OCR guidance says that hospitals can charge a cost-based fee to provide those records.

 

The researchers conducted scripted interviews with medical records departments in a simulated patient experience and also collected medical records release authorization forms. There was wide variation in the information provided on the authorization forms and from the telephone calls in terms of what data could be requested, release formats, costs, and processing times.

 

On the authorization forms, only 44 hospitals (53%) provided patients the option to acquire the entire medical record. On telephone calls, all 83 hospitals stated that they were able to release entire medical records to patients.

 

There were discrepancies in information given in telephone calls versus authorization forms among the formats hospitals said that they could use to release information: 69 versus 40 for pick up in person, 20 versus 14 for fax, 39 versus 27 for email, 55 versus 35 for CD, and 21 versus 33 for online patient portals. These results demonstrated noncompliance with HIPAA in refusing to provide records in the format requested by the patient, the study noted.

 

There were 48 hospitals that had costs of release above the federal recommendation of $6.50 for electronically maintained records. In one case, a hospital charged $541.50 for a 200-page medical record. At least seven of the hospitals were noncompliant with state requirements for processing times.

 

“Discrepancies in information provided to patients regarding medical records request processes and noncompliance with regulations appear to indicate the need for stricter enforcement of policies relating to patients’ access to their protected health information,” the researchers concluded.

 

The study is timely because the Trump administration has launched the MyHealthEData initiative, which is designed to improve EHR patient data access and use. MyHealthEData is intended to break down the barriers that prevent patients from having electronic access and control over their own health records from the device or application of their choice.

 

In 2017, President Donald Trump issued an executive order in which he directed government agencies to “improve access to and the quality of information that Americans need to make informed healthcare decisions, including data about healthcare prices and outcomes, while minimizing reporting burdens on affected plans, providers, or payers.” The order was part of a broader effort to increase market competition in the healthcare market.

 

“The MyHealthEData initiative will work to make clear that patients deserve to not only electronically receive a copy of their entire health record, but also be able to share their data with whomever they want, making the patient the center of the healthcare system. Patients can use their information to actively seek out providers and services that meet their unique healthcare needs, have a better understanding of their overall health, prevent disease, and make more informed decisions about their care,” explained a March 2018 CMS press release.

 

While the goals of MyHealthEData are lofty, the results of this Yale study call into question the ability of private healthcare organizations to fulfill the Trump administration’s initiative, never mind comply with existing HIPAA patient access requirements.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

How to Keep Your Practice’s Communication HIPAA-Compliant

How to Keep Your Practice’s Communication HIPAA-Compliant | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

HIPAA compliance is a top concern for medical practices, and for good reason–violations can result in serious consequences, including large fines and potentially even jail time. To make things more complicated, the laws themselves tend to be rather vague on what actions practices need to take to become HIPAA-compliant.

Medical practices need to protect private patient data, but they also need to be able to go about the daily business of running a practice as efficiently as possible. Technology can certainly make day-to-day operations more efficient, but new technologies also bring about new concerns with HIPAA compliance. Many practices are hesitant to adopt new technology for that very reason.

When practices do decide that they want to use technology to communicate with patients and other practices, it can be difficult to figure out where to begin because HIPAA laws can be quite vague. Practices don’t want to slip up and have to pay the price (often, quite literally) for a violation.

 

So, what can you do to keep your practice’s communications on the right side of HIPAA guidelines? We highly recommend working with an expert on HIPAA laws to make sure your communication is always compliant.

 

If you’d like to learn more on what HIPAA-compliant communication entails throughout your practice, including marketing efforts, emails, appointment reminders, patient portals, and communication with other practices, we have put together this list of helpful resources to help you stay up to date on the latest recommended best practices for HIPAA-compliant communication.

Emailing Patients

Patients who are always on-the-go may prefer to communicate with you via email. If patients request email communication, you must make that option available to them, but you still need to take the proper precautions to protect your patients and your practice from HIPAA violations.

Appointment Reminders

Even appointment reminders can be considered private health information if done improperly. You may wish to use technology to automate this routine process and free up your employees’ time for other tasks, but you need to make sure that you aren’t inadvertently giving away private patient information in the process.

Patient Portals

Practices are required to implement and use a patient portal to meet Meaningful Use requirements. However, patient portals are still subject to HIPAA laws and may, in fact, pose the greatest security risk of all practice communications because of the amount of information they contain. Always do your research before choosing a vendor for your patient portal to make sure they will keep you covered.

 

Communicating with Other Practices

It’s important for your practice to be able to communicate with your patients’ other health care providers to be able to provide the most comprehensive care possible. However, it can be quite challenging to communicate with other practices in a manner that is both efficient and HIPAA-compliant. These resources include suggestions on improving your communication strategies while protecting private information.

 

The Dangers of Sharing Patient Information via Text/IM

As a healthcare provider, your days are usually very busy, and it’s likely that the doctors you need to communicate with are equally as busy. When you need to share information, whether it’s a quick update on a patient or a request for a consult, it can be tempting to just send a quick text or instant message. If texting/instant messaging is your preferred form of communication with other doctors, you need to approach with caution.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

5 FAQs on HIPAA Compliance In The Cloud

5 FAQs on HIPAA Compliance In The Cloud | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

The Cloud Is Viable For HIPAA Applications
To ensure the protection of patient data, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) lays out guidelines that all companies in the health industry must follow—from primary care providers to data-handling agencies and third-party vendors. HIPAA rules often are complex, however. As a result, some companies inadvertently make mistakes, and others simply remain noncompliant for a variety of other reasons, leaving them subject to penalties that could add up to millions of dollars. Here’s a look at five key FAQs about HIPAA compliance and cloud computing.

 

FAQ 1: What’s Covered Under HIPAA?
The short answer: just about everything. Any piece of data that contains personally identifiable information about a patient, any type of treatment plan, or even aggregate data samples that could be traced back to individuals is covered by HIPAA. Your best bet: Assume everything falls under the scope of the law rather than trying to pick and choose.

 

FAQ 2: Is Cloud Storage Acceptable?
Absolutely. There’s no requirement for HIPAA data to be stored on-site or handled by a specific agency. In fact, it’s not the cloud itself that’s the problem when there is a problem—it’s how data is transmitted, handled, and stored in the cloud that often lands companies in hot water.

 

FAQ 3: What’s the Difference Between Covered Entities and Business Associates?
A covered entity is effectively the “owner” of a health record—for example, the primary care facility that first creates a patient profile or enters test results into its electronic health records system. Business associates, meanwhile, include any other company that handles this data. This means that cloud providers, third parties that offer on-site IT services, or other health agencies that access this data all qualify as business associates.

 

FAQ 4: Who Is Responsible for Health Data in the Cloud?
Ultimately, the covered entity bears responsibility for HIPAA-compliant handling. While business associates also can come under fire for not properly storing or encrypting data in their care, it’s up to the covered entity to ensure they’re able to audit the movement, storage and use of their HIPAA data over time.

 

FAQ 5: What Does “HIPAA Compliant” Really Mean?
While there is no official “HIPAA compliance” standard or certification that providers can obtain, it’s worth looking for other certifications that indicate good data-handling practices, such as PCI-DSS, SSAE 16, ISO 27001 and FIPS 140.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

HIPAA Audits of Covered Entities and Business Associates

HIPAA Audits of Covered Entities and Business Associates | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

In August, Advocate Health Care Network agreed to pay a $5.55 million settlement with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights (OCR), for multiple HIPAA violations. In addition, HHS also recently announced a $650,000 resolution settlement against the Catholic Health Care Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

 

These multi-million dollar penalties should be a warning for all covered entities or business associates.  Especially, with the next phase of audits now underway. During this phase, OCR is reviewing the policies and procedures utilized by covered entities and their business associates to ensure they meet the standards and specifications of the Privacy, Security, and Breach Notification Rules. These will mostly be desk audits. However, there will be some on-site audits conducted as well.

 

The audit process began in May 2016 when OCR audit sent emails to verify entity’s address and contact information. The next step was a pre-audit questionnaire that was used to gather information about the size, type, and operations of the facilities. Those who participate in the desk audits are required to provide a list of their business associates and their contact information. Emails will go out to the chosen business associates, who are expected to respond promptly. The audits are expected to focus heavily on breach responses. If a business associate does not respond within the timeframe, they will be scheduled in January 2017 for the comprehensive audits.

 

Some frequently asked questions regarding audits include:

Who Will Be Audited?

 

Every covered entity and business associate are eligible for an audit, including covered individual and organizational providers of health services; health plans, health care clearinghouses; and a range of business associates of these entities.

 

What is a Business Associate?

Business associates are considered any third-party contractor that performs work or activities on behalf of a healthcare organization or covered entity that involve the use or disclosure of protected health information.  A few examples may include:

  • Example of business associates: lawyer’s working on a case, a medical transcription or medical billing companies, document storage or disposal companies, answering services, software vendors, and consultants, patient safety and accreditation organizations, health information exchanges, etc.)
  • Examples NOT typically considered business associates: an employee, maintenance or repair personnel, a financial or banking institution that only performs payment activities or a janitorial service. 

 

What are Business Associate Agreements?

HIPAA and HITECH require practices to sign a business associate agreement (BA) with business associates that ensures they will protect all patient's PHI. The contract protects personal health information (PHI) by HIPAA guidelines. Business associates can be held accountable for any data breach and penalized for noncompliance.

 

Why are Business Associates Agreements important?

Business associate contracts are not only necessary for staying in compliance; they are crucial for the adequate protection of patient PHI.  The following are HIPAA requirements for business associate agreements:

  1. Establish the permitted and required uses and disclosures of protected health information by the business associate.
  2. Provide that the business associate will not use or further disclose the information other than as permitted or required by the contract or as required by law.
  3. Require the business associate to implement appropriate safeguards to prevent unauthorized use or disclosure of the information, including implementing requirements of the HIPAA Security Rule about electronic protected health information.
  4. Require the business associate to report to the covered entity any use or disclosure of the information not provided for by its contract, including incidents that constitute breaches of unsecured protected health information.
  5. Require the business associate to disclose protected health information as specified in its contract to satisfy a covered entity’s obligation with respect to individuals' requests for copies of their protected health information, as well as make available protected health information for amendments (and incorporate any amendments, if required) and accountings.
  6. To the extent the business associate is to carry out a covered entity’s obligation under the Privacy Rule, require the business associate to comply with the requirements applicable to the obligation.
  7. Require the business associate to make available to HHS its internal practices, books, and records relating to the use and disclosure of protected health information received from, or created or received by the business associate on behalf of, the covered entity for purposes of HHS determining the covered entity’s compliance with the HIPAA Privacy Rule.
  8. At termination of the contract, if feasible, require the business associate to return or destroy all protected health information received from, or created or received by the business associate on behalf of, the covered entity.
  9. Require the business associate to ensure that any subcontractors it may engage on its behalf that will have access to protected health information agree to the same restrictions and conditions that apply to the business associate with respect to such information.
  10. Authorize termination of the contract by the covered entity if the business associate violates a material term of the contract.  Contracts between business associates and business associates that are subcontractors are subject to these same requirements. (1)

 

How Will Auditees Be Selected?

OCR is identifying groups of covered entities and business associates that represent a broad range of health care providers, health plans, health care clearinghouses and business associates.  According to HHS, the sampling criteria for selection will include the size of the entity, affiliation with other healthcare organizations, the type of entity and its relationship to individuals, whether an organization is public or private, geographic factors, and present enforcement activity with OCR. OCR will not audit entities with an open complaint investigation or that are currently undergoing a compliance review.

 

What If an Entity Doesn’t Respond to OCR’s Requests for Information?

If an entity does not respond to requests for information from OCR, they will utilize publicly available information about the entity to create its audit pool.  An entity that does not respond to OCR may still be selected for an audit or subject to a compliance review.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

HIPAA liability protections: business associate agreements are must for effective risk management

HIPAA liability protections: business associate agreements are must for effective risk management | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

The first step for a physician, known under the language of HIPAA as a “covered entity,” is to determine the need for a BAA with a vendor. A vendor is considered a “business associate” under HIPAA if the vendor creates, receives, maintains, or transmits patient health information (PHI) on the provider’s behalf.

 

Common services performed by a business associate (BA) include claims processing, data analysis, quality assurance, billing and collection, practice management, legal, accounting, and consulting.

 

Entities that only serve as conduits, such as the post office or Internet service providers, are not considered BAs even though they handle patient information.

 

What BAs must include

If a business associate is providing services to a covered entity, the parties must enter into a written BAA that:

 

  • establishes the permitted uses/disclosures of PHI,
  • stipulates that the BA must use appropriate safeguards to prevent unauthorized PHI uses and disclosures,
  • spells out that the BA reports to the covered entity any unauthorized uses and disclosures,
  • extends the terms of the BAA to its subcontracts, and
  • establishes that upon termination of the BAA, the vendor must either return or destroy all PHI.

 

The consequences of not having a written BAA can be severe. The Office of Civil Rights (OCR) could request a copy of a covered entity’s BAA if there is a complaint registered over a covered entity or if a breach occurs.

 

Violations under HIPAA can be penalized at anywhere between $100 to $50,000 per violation, up to a calendar year maximum penalty of $1,500,000 for a single violation. The OCR could take the position that every day that the BA and covered entity did not have a business associate agreement is a violation, and multiply the fine by the number of days no BAA penalty was in place, so the penalties can be steep.

 

Liability of agents

Under HIPAA, a covered entity is liable for the acts of its agents, which can include a BA.

 

Whether an agency relationship exists is determined case by case, with the essential factor being whether the provider has the right or authority to control the BA’s conduct. The authority of a provider to give instructions or directions is the control that can result in an agency relationship.

 

The language in the BAA will be considered in determining whether an agency relationship is present. If a covered entity is controlling the performance of its BA, the covered entity should closely monitor the BA’s performance since the covered entity will be held accountable for its performance.

 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Legislation Changes and New HIPAA Regulations

Legislation Changes and New HIPAA Regulations | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

The policy of two out for every new regulation introduced means there are likely to be few, if any, new HIPAA regulations in 2018. However, that does not mean it will be all quiet on the HIPAA front. HHS’ Office for Civil Rights (OCR) director Roger Severino has indicated there are some HIPAA changes under consideration.

 

OCR is planning on removing some of the outdated and labor-intensive elements of HIPAA that provide little benefit to patients, although before HIPAA changes are made, OCR will seek feedback from healthcare industry stakeholders.

 

As with previous updates, OCR will submit notices of proposed rulemaking and will seek comment on the proposed changes. Those comments will be carefully considered before any HIPAA changes are made.

 

The full list of proposed changes to the HIPAA Privacy Rule have not been made public, although Severino did provide some insight into what can be expected in 2018 at a recent HIPAA summit in Virginia.

 

Severino explained there were three possible changes to HIPAA regulations in 2018, the first relates to enforcement of HIPAA Rules by OCR.

 

Since the introduction of the Enforcement Rule, OCR has had the power to financially penalize HIPAA covered entities that are discovered to have violated HIPAA Rules or not put sufficient effort into compliance. Since the incorporation of HITECH Act into HIPAA in 2009, OCR has been permitted to retain a proportion of the settlements and CMPs it collects through its enforcement actions. Those funds are used, in part, to cover the cost of future enforcement actions and to provide restitution to victims. To date, OCR has not done the latter.

 

OCR is considering requesting information on how a proportion of the settlements and civil monetary penalties it collects can be directed to the victims of healthcare data breaches and HIPAA violations.

 

One area of bureaucracy that OCR is considering changing is the requirement for covered entities to retain signed forms from patients confirming they have received a copy of the covered entity’s notice of privacy practices. In many cases, the forms are signed by patients who just want to see a doctor. The forms are not actually read.

 

One potential change is to remove the requirement to obtain and store signed forms and instead to inform patients of privacy practices via a notice in a prominent place within the covered entity’s facilities.

 

Severino also said OCR is considering changing HIPAA regulations in 2018 relating to good faith disclosures of PHI. OCR is considering formally clarifying that disclosing PHI in certain circumstances is permitted without first obtaining consent from patients – The sharing of PHI with family members and close friends when a patient is incapacitated or in cases of opioid drug abuse for instance.

 

While HIPAA does permit healthcare providers to disclose PHI when a patient is in imminent harm, further rulemaking is required to cover good faith disclosures.

 

While these HIPAA changes are being considered, it could take until 2019 before they are implemented.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Strategies for Measuring HIPAA Compliance Efforts

Strategies for Measuring HIPAA Compliance Efforts | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

About 40% of large health care organizations do not take the time to measure how well their HIPAA compliance measures are working, according to Brian Wells, Chief Technology Officer of the cybersecurity firm Merlin International, headquartered in Vienna, Virginia. Most are unaware if they have thwarted cyberattacks, blocked malicious emails or kept staff from releasing inappropriate information.

 

“If they can't report that to the board, then they may stop giving them money to do more,” Wells said.

 

Measuring an organization's HIPAA strategy can be challenging. It is difficult to know if efforts to thwart cyberattacks have actually prevented breaches. “When ransomware like WannaCry comes out, it may be possible to say you protected yourselves,” he said. “If nothing bad has happened in a while, you can assume you are either doing a good job or just haven't been a target.”

 

How are providers supposed to measure HIPAA compliance effectiveness? Here are a few strategies for determining if an organization is on the right path using both internal and external resources.

 

A human touch
Wells works with hospitals now, but when he was on the medical practice side, his group performed annual testing on HIPAA regulations. The test was not hard, but everyone in the practice had to pass it. This not only lets a provider know where education is slipping through the cracks, but also provides a paper trail to point to should a practice get audited.

 

Adam Greene, a partner with Seattle-based Davis Wright Tremaine, also recommends informal testing to make sure people

 

understand their obligations under HIPAA. For example, the person in charge of HIPAA security can make a checklist to ask staff that includes questions like: “If someone wants to see something in their medical record, how would you respond?” Staff should know the patient has a right to records and the process involved in turning them over, be it filling out a form or directing the patient to the staff member who handles requests.

 

Another option is to assign an individual who would be accountable for walking around an office to ensure protected health information is secured properly. A few points to include would be ensuring computers are not facing toward patients; locked cabinets do not have the key hanging next to them; and people are logging out when they leave their computers.

“There could be a 10- to 20-question checklist and they can use it to see how they are doing and compare it over time,” said Marti Arvin, Vice President of Audit Strategy for CynergisTek, which is headquartered in Mission Viejo, California.

 

Arvin said an internal audit can be used to make sure staff members know where privacy policies are and that they are understood; whether all patients at their initial visit are provided with notices of privacy procedures; and if all of the staff members are receiving HIPAA training as they should.

 

Technology testing
Because health IT is constantly under attack, it would be difficult, expensive, and “voluminous” to show all of the attacks an organization has defended against, Greene said.

One option instead is to perform vulnerability scanning on a regular basis to examine if a system has unpatched software or other vulnerabilities. Another good practice is a phishing test. Here, an organization generates its own malware link and sends it to staff to see if anyone clicks.

 

Wells said an IT department can put in place a program that will check to see that people are only doing what they are supposed to be doing with their devices. It can also detect unmanaged devices that appear in the system. Electronic audit logs can be monitored to ensure people are not abusing their access.

 

Encryption is a must-have under HIPAA, and Greene said the best way to look at it is demonstrating that laptops are encrypted and will remain that way. For instance, someone with administrative rights can turn off encryption if they choose. But technical measures can be used to limit someone's ability to turn it off and to maintain compliance.

 

“Those things are really more to let you know how compliant you think you are,” Wells said. “For a full security audit, you are typically going to have to hire out.”

Keep it simple


Most physician practices are “dramatically under-resourced” in HIPAA staffing, Greene said. “The office administrator might be the privacy officer and maybe the security officer, too,” he said. “That is a lot of responsibilities, so providers need to give it some thought … and be careful about laying [extra responsibilities] on an office administrator who doesn't have enough time to do their regular job.”

 

Some of these auditing duties may need to be spread throughout an organization or hired out, but practices need to have an individual who is held accountable for auditing HIPAA policies. “There should be some oversight,” Arvin said. “Lots of practices give the title of security officer, but don't give resources or educate them on the responsibilities of overseeing the program.”

Greene also recommends making this a long-term endeavor. Instead of trying to look at all areas of compliance at once, he recommends starting with places where an office has had problems, where similar practices have had settlements, or where the Office for Civil Rights offers guidance.

 

For example, an individual responsible for HIPAA compliance might first spend some time ensuring staff members are providing patients with access to their records and if they are charging the right amount for them. Then he or she could move to other areas, such as disclosure of privacy practice guidelines.

“You can ultimately look at different regulatory requirements and create a master plan for how you are going to audit them,” he said. “Prioritize some immediately and others next year or the year after because they are seemingly lower risk.”

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

HIPAA Privacy Rule Can Be Tool for Health Information Exchange

HIPAA Privacy Rule Can Be Tool for Health Information Exchange | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Rather than being a barrier to information sharing and interoperability, the HIPAA Privacy Rule can be seen as a tool to facilitate health information exchange and flow across the health ecosystem, argued OCR and ONC in an Aug. 30 blog post. 

 

The HIPAA Privacy Rule provides individuals with a right to access information in their medical and other health records maintained by a HIPAA covered entity, such as an individual’s healthcare provider or health plan, noted ONC Chief Privacy Officer Kathryn Marchesini and OCR Acting Deputy Director for Health Information Privacy Timothy Noonan.

 

The authors wrote that the 21st Century Cures Act, enacted in 2016, among other things called for greater individual access to information and interoperability of healthcare records. The act directed HHS to address information blocking and promote the trusted exchange of health information.

 

 

“Information blocking occurs when a person or entity – typically a health care provider, IT developer, or EHR vendor – knowingly and unreasonably interferes with the exchange and use of electronic health information,” ONC explained.

 

ONC and OCR recently began a campaign encouraging individuals to access and use copies of their healthcare records.

The two HHS offices are offering training for healthcare providers about the HIPAA right of access and have developed guidance to help consumers take more control of decisions regarding their health.

 

These guidelines include access guidance for professionals, HIPAA right of access training for healthcare providers, and the Get It. Check It. Use It. website for individuals.

The authors also noted that the HIPAA Privacy Rule supports the sharing of health information among healthcare providers, health plans, and those operating on their behalf, for treatment, payment, and healthcare operations. It also provides ways for transmitting health information to relatives involved in an individual’s care as well as for research, public health, and other important activities.

 

“To further promote the portability of health information, we encourage the development, refinement, and use of health information technology (health IT) to provide healthcare providers, health plans, and individuals and their personal representatives the ability to more rapidly access, exchange, and use health information electronically,” they commeted.

 

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and the National Institutes for Health (NIH), along with the White House Office of American Innovation, are working to support the exchange of health information and encourage the sharing of health information electronically.

 

For example, CMS is calling on healthcare providers and health plans to share health information directly with patients, upon their request.

 

Also, NIH has established a research program to help improve healthcare for all individuals that will require the portability of health information.

 

The White House’s MyHealthEData initiative, which originated from President Donald Trump’s 2017 executive order to promote healthcare choice and competition, aims to break down the barriers preventing patients from having access to their health records.

 

The executive order directed government agencies to “improve access to and the quality of information that Americans need to make informed healthcare decisions.” The order is part of a broader effort to increase market competition in the healthcare market.

 

ONC developed a guide intended to educate individuals and caregivers about the value of online medical records as well as how to access and use their information. ONC also produced videos and fact sheets to inform individuals about their right to access their health information under HIPAA.

 

“It’s important that patients and their caregivers have access to their own health information so they can make decisions about their care and treatments,” said National Coordinator for Health Information Technology Don Rucker. “This guide will help answer some of the questions that patients may have when asking for their health information.”

 

The agency said that an individual’s ability to access and use health information electronically is a cornerstone of its efforts to increase patient engagement, improve health outcomes, and advance person-centered health.

 

ONC noted that the guide supports both the 21st Century Cures Act goal of improving patient access to their electronic health information and the MyHealthEData initiative.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Health insurer Reaches Settlements Over HIPAA Violations 

Health insurer Reaches Settlements Over HIPAA Violations  | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Health insurer Aetna has reached settlements with a number of state attorney generals over HIPAA violations resulting from mailings to HIV/AIDS and cardiac patients, the New Jersey attorney general announced

 

The three states and district involved in the Aetna settlements are Connecticut, the District of Columbia (DC), New Jersey, and Washington. Aetna agreed to pay Connecticut around $100,000, DC around $175,000, and New Jersey $365,000. Washington has not yet disclosed how much it will receive from Aetna.

 

As part of the settlements, Aetna has agreed to implement policy, protocol, and training reforms designed to safeguard individuals’ PHI and ensure the confidentiality of mailings containing that information. The company has also agreed to hire an independent consultant to evaluate and report on its privacy protection practices and to monitor its compliance with the settlements’ terms.

 

 

“Companies entrusted with individuals’ protected health information have a duty to avoid improper disclosures,” said NJ Attorney General Gurbir Grewal. “Aetna fell short here, potentially subjecting thousands of individuals to the stigma and discrimination that, unfortunately, still may accompany disclosure of their HIV/AIDS status. I am pleased that our investigation has led Aetna to adopt measures to prevent this from happening again.”

 

The investigation revealed that Aetna disclosed HIV/AIDS-related information on about 12,000 individuals through a third-party mailing on July 28, 2017. The envelopes used in the mailing had a transparent address window, which revealed recipients’ names, addresses, and text that included the words “HIV medications.”

 

The second breach occurred in September 2017 and involved a mailing sent to 1,600 individuals about a study of patients with atrial fibrilation (AFib). The envelopes for the mailing included the name and logo for the study, IMPACT AFib, which could have been interpreted as indicating that the addressee had an AFib diagnosis.

 

DC Attorney General Karl Racine said in a statement: “Aetna failed to protect the health information of District residents and illegally disclosed their HIV status. Every patient should feel confident that their insurance company or health provider will safeguard their confidential medical information. Today’s action will prevent further disclosures and warns other insurance companies that they are responsible for protecting consumers’ private information.”

 

The three states and DC alleged that Aetna not only violated HIPAA but also state laws pertaining to the PHI of individuals in general and of persons with AIDS or HIV infection in particular.

 

In January 2018, Aetna settled a class action lawsuit that required it to pay $17 million in relief to the 12,000 individuals regarding the HIV mailing.

 

Lead plaintiff Andrew Beckett, which is a pseudonym, alleged in his original complaint that PHI and confidential HIV-related information “was disclosed improperly by Aetna and/or Aetna-related or affiliated entities, or on their behalf, to third parties, including, without limitation, Aetna’s legal counsel and a settlement administrator, and through a subsequent mailing of written notices that were required to be sent as part of a settlement of legal claims that had been filed against certain Aetna-related entities or affiliates.”

 

The letters from Aetna had originally been sent in response to a settlement over previous data privacy violation worry. The healthcare company had been sued in two separate class-action lawsuits in 2014 and 2015.

 

“Those lawsuits alleged that Aetna jeopardized the privacy of people taking HIV medications by requiring its insureds to receive their HIV medications through mail and not allowing them to pick up their medications in person at the pharmacy,” according to the 2017 lawsuit.

 

In response to the January 2018 lawsuit settlement, Aetna said that it is “implementing measures designed to ensure something like this does not happen again as part of our commitment to best practices in protecting sensitive health information.”

 

“Through our outreach efforts, immediate relief program and this settlement we have worked to address the potential impact to members following this unfortunate incident,” Aetna said in a statement.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

HIPAA as an umbrella for county/municipal cybersecurity

HIPAA as an umbrella for county/municipal cybersecurity | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Are you a covered entity?

Basing a county/municipal information security (infosec) and cybersecurity framework on HIPAA is a logical choice, especially if you have one or more covered entities (CE) in your organization.

 

How do you know if you have or are a CE? If some department or division within your organization is a health care provider, a health plan or a health care clearinghouse, they are a CE. If you have clinics, doctors, psychologists, clinical social workers, chiropractors, nursing homes or pharmacies, you are a CE [i]. Moreover, many counties have divisions or departments that function as accountable care organizations (ACO), managed care organizations (MCO), health care clearinghouses or health maintenance organizations (HMO). These are all common functions, especially within large county governments.

Are you in compliance?

If anything described above applies to your county or municipal organization, one or more divisions of your organization is a CE and is required to be in compliance with both the HIPAA Security Rule and the HIPAA Privacy Rule.

 

In my experience, most county governments that have covered entities are out of compliance. Where does your organization stand?

 

I suspect what often happens is that executives look at something like information security policy requirements and say:

This has tech words in it. IT handles tech stuff. Therefore, I’ll turn it over to IT to handle.

 

What a huge mistake. An organizational policy dealing with the manner in which information is handled, regardless of whether or not HIPAA regulations apply, requires communication and coordination with legal, HR, IT, information security, risk management, archives, county clerks and other divisions within your organization. It’s not a tech issue; it’s a high-level, interdisciplinary executive function. It is an information governance (IG) issue, and it shouldn’t be handed off to your IT director or CIO to address unilaterally.'

Trust but verify

There are a number of reasons why IT should not be delegated sole responsibility for organizational information security. For one, a successful information security program requires checks, balances, and oversight. Trust but verify! A successful program also requires expert knowledge of departmental business processes that often exceeds the knowledge of the IT staff. Moreover, if your department heads have equivalent status within the organization, it is not appropriate for a CIO or IT director to unilaterally dictate policy to his or her colleagues of equal status. There are far too many IT departments that have adversarial relations with their end users because of their autocratic and often illogical decrees. Information security requires a team approach with executive and board oversight.

Extend HIPAA to your enterprise

If you have covered entities in your organization and have limited or nonexistent enterprise security policies, I would recommend that you consider building your entire enterprise information security policy on the HIPAA Security Rule in order to raise the entire organization up to that level while also getting compliant with federal law.

 

Why? It is highly probable that your organization uses shared facilities, shared IT infrastructure and shared services. Multiple information security levels create a significant management challenge and are certain to cause chaos and confusion. Multiple security stances will lead to security gaps and ultimately to breaches. Keep it simple and operate at the highest standard using generally accepted good practices.

Develop your policy with the HIPAA Security Rule

There are two major components to HIPAA, the Privacy Rule and the Security Rule. For the purpose of this discussion, only the Security Rule matters, but we’ll definitely discuss privacy another day.

The original HIPAA Security Rule document, 45 CFR Parts 160, 162 and 164 Health Insurance Reform: Security Standards; Final Rule, is 49 pages of small print. However, the meat of the document is contained within the final six pages and includes a handy matrix on page 48 (8380 of the federal register).

The security standards in HIPAA are broken down into three sections, each of which has multiple layers and subcomponents:

  • Administrative Safeguards (9 components)
  • Physical Safeguards (4 components)
  • Technical Safeguards (5 components)

 

These three major areas break down into at least 43 separate policy areas where your organization must build safeguards, including risk analysis, contingency planning, backup, passwords, HR sanctions and terminations, disaster recovery, encryption and many more.

 

Using the components in the matrix should enable you and your IG committee to quickly generate a suite of security policies and procedures that, when implemented and enforced, will vastly improve your current information security stance.

 

These are all policy areas that must be addressed as a matter of good practice whether or not you are a covered entity. This is why HIPAA is an excellent starting point for municipal governments that are infosec policy deficient.

Next Steps

1. Find out where your organization stands in terms of information security policies and procedures.

2. Find out whether or not you have covered entities in your organization. Must you comply with HIPAA? Are you compliant?

3. Meet with your IG committee to discuss your findings.

4. If you don’t have an IG committee — start one!

5. Download and review the HIPAA Security Rule. Use it to build your organization’s information security policies.

6. Use either the PDCA (Plan, Do, Check, Act) approach or the DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) approach to maintaining continuous improvement.

7. Begin building a culture of security in your organization.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

The Easiest Complete HIPAA Compliance Checklist You'll Ever See

The Easiest Complete HIPAA Compliance Checklist You'll Ever See | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it
The Best HIPAA Checklist Is…HIPAA Itself?

Yes, basically. First, let’s make sure we’re on the same page about what HIPAA is exactly. HIPAA is federal legislation, as is the HITECH act that updated parts of it. Title II of that legislation relates to the privacy and security of protected health information, and this is the meat of what most physicians need to care about when “HIPAA compliance” comes up.

 

Title II of HIPAA also requires HHS to create federal regulations that implement the ideas in the rest of the act. These regulations spell out exactly what healthcare providers must do, and they are now complete and published in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR),

 

Luckily, HHS also grouped these regulations into six sections, called “rules,” and these are really the ultimate HIPAA compliance checklist. If you can understand and comply with each of these six rules, you’ll have a good claim to HIPAA compliance. So let’s do it; let’s count down the checklist that HHS gives us:

The Six Rules of the HIPAA Compliance Checklist:

#1: Standardize Your Coding and Electronic Transmissions

This one is easy. HIPAA seeks to make sure that everybody is communicating about healthcare issues in one unified way, and regulations in its “Transactions and Code Sets” rule accomplish this.

One part of this rule specifies what code sets are allowable for describing medical data, including ICD-CM for conditions, NDC for drug names, and CPT/HCPCS for procedures. Another part then defines and mandates the specific electronic transmission formats that can be used to convey the encoded data.

 HIPAA Checklist: How to Comply with Rule 1

  1. Use a compliant electronic health record (EHR).

Simply pick a modern EHR to use in your practice. They will typically use the correct encoding and transmission formats automatically, and you can confirm this with the vendor before you buy anything.

That’s it. Done. Check.

#2: Get Unique Identifiers for You and Your Organization

In the “Identifier Standards” rule, HIPAA mandates that every individual or organization that renders healthcare have a unique 10-digit National Provider Identifier (NPI). Type 1 NPIs are for individuals, and type 2 NPIs are for organizations. NPIs are used in encoding and transmitting healthcare data, and they help enforce clarity. Two doctors may have the same name and practice in the same city, but their differing NPIs will ensure that they are not mistaken for one another.

 HIPAA Checklist: How to Comply with Rule 2

  1. Make sure that all HIPAA-covered entities in your practice have an NPI.

You probably already have an NPI. If you don’t,  you can get one through the National Plan and Provider Enumeration System (NPPES) that HHS runs.

That’s it. Done. Check.

#3: Protect Your Patients’ Privacy

The HIPAA Privacy Rule, in conjunction with the HIPAA Security Rule, constitutes the most important part of HIPAA for most providers. Fundamentally, the Privacy Rule is all about individuals’ health information, termed “protected health information (PHI).” The rule spells out how healthcare entities may use PHI, and it also delineates patients’ rights to be informed of and control those uses.

HHS has written an important summary of the Privacy Rule, and it’s worth a read. High-level points from the summary to internalize:

  • The Privacy Rule protects all “individually identifiable health information” held or transmitted by a covered entity or its business associate, in any form or media, whether electronic, paper or oral. The Privacy Rule calls this information “PHI.”
  • A central aspect of the Privacy Rule is the principle of “minimum necessary” use and disclosure. A [healthcare] entity must make reasonable efforts to use, disclose, and request only the minimum amount of PHI needed to accomplish [an intended purpose].
  • Except in certain circumstances, individuals have the right to review and obtain a copy of their PHI and any of its uses and disclosures. They may also demand corrections to it.
  • Each [healthcare] entity, with certain exceptions, must provide a notice of its privacy practices.

 HIPAA Checklist: How to Comply with Rule 3

  1. Designate a “privacy official” in your organization who will be tasked with developing and implementing your privacy policies and procedures and ensure that this person is available to receive requests and complaints related to the Privacy Rule.
  2. Understand the definition of PHI and identify information in your practice that is PHI.
  3. Keep a record of all uses and disclosures of PHI in your practice.
  4. Understand the things your practice must do under the Privacy Rule, especially including those things that relate to your patients’ control over their own PHI.
  5. Understand the things your practice may do under the Privacy Rule, especially including those uses and disclosures of PHI that are allowable without explicit, written patient consent. Always use the concept of “minimum necessary” to guide your uses and disclosures.
  6. Identify your “business associates,” as defined by HIPAA. If another company interacts with PHI from your practice, they are likely a business associate, and you need to have a formal “business associate contract” with them that extends the duties of HIPAA to their operations.
  7. Create a Notice of Privacy Practices. This must contain specific items, and it’s best to start with a template that HHS provides. Know when, where, and to whom this notice must be made available.
  8. Implement administrative, technical, and physical safeguards to prevent impermissible intentional or unintentional use or disclosure of PHI. These should also act to limit incidental uses or disclosures.
  9. Ensure ongoing training of your practice’s workforce on your privacy policies and procedures.
  10. Have your privacy official create and maintain a written document of the policies and procedures that you have developed to accomplish the above items.

Well, this section was a bit longer than the first two, but that’s because the Privacy Rule is so crucial to HIPAA. It is, unfortunately, also critical that you review the Privacy Rule yourself. The checklist above is a good start on minimum necessary activities, but there is no perfect, comprehensive checklist that will work for every type of practice. HIPAA is about ensuring best practices in every type of healthcare provider, and there is no substitute for figuring out what that means for you and your exact practice.

HHS states that the Privacy Rule is comprised of 45 CFR Part 160 and Subparts A and E of 45 CFR Part 164, and you can refer to these directly or, at least, to the HHS Privacy Rule summary to make sure that you are creating and following all of the privacy policies and procedures that your specific practice needs.

#4: Secure Your Electronic Medical Information

The HIPAA Security Rule is a nitty-gritty rundown of “the technical and non-technical safeguards that organizations […] must put in place to secure individuals’ electronic PHI.” That quote comes directly from a Security Rule summary that HHS has written, in which they explain that the Security Rule takes the somewhat amorphous concepts of the Privacy Rule and lays out a more exact framework to implement them.

Unlike the Privacy Rule, which applies to all PHI, the Security Rule applies only to PHI that your practice “receives, maintains or transmits in electronic form.” To comply with the Security Rule, your organization must adopt an ongoing process of risk analysis that has the following general form:

  1. Assess risks to electronic PHI in your organization, the current state of your security measures, and any gaps between the two
  2. Implement “administrative, technical, and physical safeguards” to address the gaps
  3. Document all of steps 1 and 2 and keep the records
  4. Repeat steps 1 to 3 on a periodic basis

That’s it, really. And continuing their pattern of being hugely helpful, HHS has created a seven-part educational paper series that will walk you through this. For the checklist in this section, we’ll lean on these papers heavily…since HHS literally provides checklists in them.

 HIPAA Checklist: How to Comply with Rule 4

  1. Perform a risk analysis for electronic PHI in your organization
  2. Implement safeguards to address security gaps identified by the risk analysis:
    1. Administrative
    2. Physical
    3. Technical
  3. Make sure everything is documented appropriately
  4. Repeat steps 1 to 3 on a periodic basis

Each HHS document linked above has a reproduction of Appendix A of the actual Security Rule, which is effectively a checklist of necessary items to consider for the administrative, physical, and technical safeguards that you need. Some of the documents extend this list with other items, such as the document linked in step 3 above.

As with the Privacy Rule, it’s important that you read the Security Rule yourself at least one time. HHS wrote the rules generally so that they could function for organizations of any size, from one person to thousands, and because of this, only you can decide exactly how your organization can best comply. Per HHS, “The Security Rule is located at 45 CFR Part 160 and Subparts A and C of Part 164.” And again, they’ve also written a summary of it.

#5: Understand the Penalties for Violations

The HIPAA Enforcement Rule (codified at 45 CFR Part 160, Subparts C, D, and E) establish procedures for the investigation of possible HIPAA violations and sets civil fines for infractions. Fines can be up to $50,000 per violation per day, so it can add up quickly and is not a joke. Violations can also carry criminal penalties, including fines and jail time, but these are not covered by HHS regulation.

 HIPAA Checklist: How to Comply with Rule 5

  1. You don’t have to do anything ahead of time

If HHS investigates your practice, then this rule becomes relevant to you, but there’s nothing here that you need to do proactively.

#6: Learn How to Handle Information Breaches

The HIPAA Breach Notification Rule (codified at 45 CFR §§ 164.400-414) requires healthcare organizations to provide notification after breaches of PHI. A “breach” is, basically, an impermissible use or disclosure of PHI, as detailed in the HIPAA Privacy Rule. Depending on the type of breach, the notification might need to be made to the affected individuals, the media, or the HHS Secretary. HHS has further guidance available on the topic.

 HIPAA Checklist: How to Comply with Rule 6

  1. You don’t have to do anything ahead of time

Once again, you only need to worry about this rule if you identify a PHI breach, which you should be monitoring for as part of your compliance with the HIPAA Privacy Rule and Security Rule.

 

HIPAA compliance is all about adopting good processes in your organization, and HHS has laid out a path to compliance that is nearly a checklist. All you have to do is follow it.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.