HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices
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HIPAA Compliance and HIPAA Risk management Articles, Tips and Updates for Medical Practices and Physicians
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HIPAA Privacy Rule Can Be Tool for Health Information Exchange

HIPAA Privacy Rule Can Be Tool for Health Information Exchange | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Rather than being a barrier to information sharing and interoperability, the HIPAA Privacy Rule can be seen as a tool to facilitate health information exchange and flow across the health ecosystem, argued OCR and ONC in an Aug. 30 blog post. 

 

The HIPAA Privacy Rule provides individuals with a right to access information in their medical and other health records maintained by a HIPAA covered entity, such as an individual’s healthcare provider or health plan, noted ONC Chief Privacy Officer Kathryn Marchesini and OCR Acting Deputy Director for Health Information Privacy Timothy Noonan.

 

The authors wrote that the 21st Century Cures Act, enacted in 2016, among other things called for greater individual access to information and interoperability of healthcare records. The act directed HHS to address information blocking and promote the trusted exchange of health information.

 

 

“Information blocking occurs when a person or entity – typically a health care provider, IT developer, or EHR vendor – knowingly and unreasonably interferes with the exchange and use of electronic health information,” ONC explained.

 

ONC and OCR recently began a campaign encouraging individuals to access and use copies of their healthcare records.

The two HHS offices are offering training for healthcare providers about the HIPAA right of access and have developed guidance to help consumers take more control of decisions regarding their health.

 

These guidelines include access guidance for professionals, HIPAA right of access training for healthcare providers, and the Get It. Check It. Use It. website for individuals.

The authors also noted that the HIPAA Privacy Rule supports the sharing of health information among healthcare providers, health plans, and those operating on their behalf, for treatment, payment, and healthcare operations. It also provides ways for transmitting health information to relatives involved in an individual’s care as well as for research, public health, and other important activities.

 

“To further promote the portability of health information, we encourage the development, refinement, and use of health information technology (health IT) to provide healthcare providers, health plans, and individuals and their personal representatives the ability to more rapidly access, exchange, and use health information electronically,” they commeted.

 

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and the National Institutes for Health (NIH), along with the White House Office of American Innovation, are working to support the exchange of health information and encourage the sharing of health information electronically.

 

For example, CMS is calling on healthcare providers and health plans to share health information directly with patients, upon their request.

 

Also, NIH has established a research program to help improve healthcare for all individuals that will require the portability of health information.

 

The White House’s MyHealthEData initiative, which originated from President Donald Trump’s 2017 executive order to promote healthcare choice and competition, aims to break down the barriers preventing patients from having access to their health records.

 

The executive order directed government agencies to “improve access to and the quality of information that Americans need to make informed healthcare decisions.” The order is part of a broader effort to increase market competition in the healthcare market.

 

ONC developed a guide intended to educate individuals and caregivers about the value of online medical records as well as how to access and use their information. ONC also produced videos and fact sheets to inform individuals about their right to access their health information under HIPAA.

 

“It’s important that patients and their caregivers have access to their own health information so they can make decisions about their care and treatments,” said National Coordinator for Health Information Technology Don Rucker. “This guide will help answer some of the questions that patients may have when asking for their health information.”

 

The agency said that an individual’s ability to access and use health information electronically is a cornerstone of its efforts to increase patient engagement, improve health outcomes, and advance person-centered health.

 

ONC noted that the guide supports both the 21st Century Cures Act goal of improving patient access to their electronic health information and the MyHealthEData initiative.

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Health insurer Reaches Settlements Over HIPAA Violations 

Health insurer Reaches Settlements Over HIPAA Violations  | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Health insurer Aetna has reached settlements with a number of state attorney generals over HIPAA violations resulting from mailings to HIV/AIDS and cardiac patients, the New Jersey attorney general announced

 

The three states and district involved in the Aetna settlements are Connecticut, the District of Columbia (DC), New Jersey, and Washington. Aetna agreed to pay Connecticut around $100,000, DC around $175,000, and New Jersey $365,000. Washington has not yet disclosed how much it will receive from Aetna.

 

As part of the settlements, Aetna has agreed to implement policy, protocol, and training reforms designed to safeguard individuals’ PHI and ensure the confidentiality of mailings containing that information. The company has also agreed to hire an independent consultant to evaluate and report on its privacy protection practices and to monitor its compliance with the settlements’ terms.

 

 

“Companies entrusted with individuals’ protected health information have a duty to avoid improper disclosures,” said NJ Attorney General Gurbir Grewal. “Aetna fell short here, potentially subjecting thousands of individuals to the stigma and discrimination that, unfortunately, still may accompany disclosure of their HIV/AIDS status. I am pleased that our investigation has led Aetna to adopt measures to prevent this from happening again.”

 

The investigation revealed that Aetna disclosed HIV/AIDS-related information on about 12,000 individuals through a third-party mailing on July 28, 2017. The envelopes used in the mailing had a transparent address window, which revealed recipients’ names, addresses, and text that included the words “HIV medications.”

 

The second breach occurred in September 2017 and involved a mailing sent to 1,600 individuals about a study of patients with atrial fibrilation (AFib). The envelopes for the mailing included the name and logo for the study, IMPACT AFib, which could have been interpreted as indicating that the addressee had an AFib diagnosis.

 

DC Attorney General Karl Racine said in a statement: “Aetna failed to protect the health information of District residents and illegally disclosed their HIV status. Every patient should feel confident that their insurance company or health provider will safeguard their confidential medical information. Today’s action will prevent further disclosures and warns other insurance companies that they are responsible for protecting consumers’ private information.”

 

The three states and DC alleged that Aetna not only violated HIPAA but also state laws pertaining to the PHI of individuals in general and of persons with AIDS or HIV infection in particular.

 

In January 2018, Aetna settled a class action lawsuit that required it to pay $17 million in relief to the 12,000 individuals regarding the HIV mailing.

 

Lead plaintiff Andrew Beckett, which is a pseudonym, alleged in his original complaint that PHI and confidential HIV-related information “was disclosed improperly by Aetna and/or Aetna-related or affiliated entities, or on their behalf, to third parties, including, without limitation, Aetna’s legal counsel and a settlement administrator, and through a subsequent mailing of written notices that were required to be sent as part of a settlement of legal claims that had been filed against certain Aetna-related entities or affiliates.”

 

The letters from Aetna had originally been sent in response to a settlement over previous data privacy violation worry. The healthcare company had been sued in two separate class-action lawsuits in 2014 and 2015.

 

“Those lawsuits alleged that Aetna jeopardized the privacy of people taking HIV medications by requiring its insureds to receive their HIV medications through mail and not allowing them to pick up their medications in person at the pharmacy,” according to the 2017 lawsuit.

 

In response to the January 2018 lawsuit settlement, Aetna said that it is “implementing measures designed to ensure something like this does not happen again as part of our commitment to best practices in protecting sensitive health information.”

 

“Through our outreach efforts, immediate relief program and this settlement we have worked to address the potential impact to members following this unfortunate incident,” Aetna said in a statement.

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HIPAA as an umbrella for county/municipal cybersecurity

HIPAA as an umbrella for county/municipal cybersecurity | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Are you a covered entity?

Basing a county/municipal information security (infosec) and cybersecurity framework on HIPAA is a logical choice, especially if you have one or more covered entities (CE) in your organization.

 

How do you know if you have or are a CE? If some department or division within your organization is a health care provider, a health plan or a health care clearinghouse, they are a CE. If you have clinics, doctors, psychologists, clinical social workers, chiropractors, nursing homes or pharmacies, you are a CE [i]. Moreover, many counties have divisions or departments that function as accountable care organizations (ACO), managed care organizations (MCO), health care clearinghouses or health maintenance organizations (HMO). These are all common functions, especially within large county governments.

Are you in compliance?

If anything described above applies to your county or municipal organization, one or more divisions of your organization is a CE and is required to be in compliance with both the HIPAA Security Rule and the HIPAA Privacy Rule.

 

In my experience, most county governments that have covered entities are out of compliance. Where does your organization stand?

 

I suspect what often happens is that executives look at something like information security policy requirements and say:

This has tech words in it. IT handles tech stuff. Therefore, I’ll turn it over to IT to handle.

 

What a huge mistake. An organizational policy dealing with the manner in which information is handled, regardless of whether or not HIPAA regulations apply, requires communication and coordination with legal, HR, IT, information security, risk management, archives, county clerks and other divisions within your organization. It’s not a tech issue; it’s a high-level, interdisciplinary executive function. It is an information governance (IG) issue, and it shouldn’t be handed off to your IT director or CIO to address unilaterally.'

Trust but verify

There are a number of reasons why IT should not be delegated sole responsibility for organizational information security. For one, a successful information security program requires checks, balances, and oversight. Trust but verify! A successful program also requires expert knowledge of departmental business processes that often exceeds the knowledge of the IT staff. Moreover, if your department heads have equivalent status within the organization, it is not appropriate for a CIO or IT director to unilaterally dictate policy to his or her colleagues of equal status. There are far too many IT departments that have adversarial relations with their end users because of their autocratic and often illogical decrees. Information security requires a team approach with executive and board oversight.

Extend HIPAA to your enterprise

If you have covered entities in your organization and have limited or nonexistent enterprise security policies, I would recommend that you consider building your entire enterprise information security policy on the HIPAA Security Rule in order to raise the entire organization up to that level while also getting compliant with federal law.

 

Why? It is highly probable that your organization uses shared facilities, shared IT infrastructure and shared services. Multiple information security levels create a significant management challenge and are certain to cause chaos and confusion. Multiple security stances will lead to security gaps and ultimately to breaches. Keep it simple and operate at the highest standard using generally accepted good practices.

Develop your policy with the HIPAA Security Rule

There are two major components to HIPAA, the Privacy Rule and the Security Rule. For the purpose of this discussion, only the Security Rule matters, but we’ll definitely discuss privacy another day.

The original HIPAA Security Rule document, 45 CFR Parts 160, 162 and 164 Health Insurance Reform: Security Standards; Final Rule, is 49 pages of small print. However, the meat of the document is contained within the final six pages and includes a handy matrix on page 48 (8380 of the federal register).

The security standards in HIPAA are broken down into three sections, each of which has multiple layers and subcomponents:

  • Administrative Safeguards (9 components)
  • Physical Safeguards (4 components)
  • Technical Safeguards (5 components)

 

These three major areas break down into at least 43 separate policy areas where your organization must build safeguards, including risk analysis, contingency planning, backup, passwords, HR sanctions and terminations, disaster recovery, encryption and many more.

 

Using the components in the matrix should enable you and your IG committee to quickly generate a suite of security policies and procedures that, when implemented and enforced, will vastly improve your current information security stance.

 

These are all policy areas that must be addressed as a matter of good practice whether or not you are a covered entity. This is why HIPAA is an excellent starting point for municipal governments that are infosec policy deficient.

Next Steps

1. Find out where your organization stands in terms of information security policies and procedures.

2. Find out whether or not you have covered entities in your organization. Must you comply with HIPAA? Are you compliant?

3. Meet with your IG committee to discuss your findings.

4. If you don’t have an IG committee — start one!

5. Download and review the HIPAA Security Rule. Use it to build your organization’s information security policies.

6. Use either the PDCA (Plan, Do, Check, Act) approach or the DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) approach to maintaining continuous improvement.

7. Begin building a culture of security in your organization.

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The Easiest Complete HIPAA Compliance Checklist You'll Ever See

The Easiest Complete HIPAA Compliance Checklist You'll Ever See | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it
The Best HIPAA Checklist Is…HIPAA Itself?

Yes, basically. First, let’s make sure we’re on the same page about what HIPAA is exactly. HIPAA is federal legislation, as is the HITECH act that updated parts of it. Title II of that legislation relates to the privacy and security of protected health information, and this is the meat of what most physicians need to care about when “HIPAA compliance” comes up.

 

Title II of HIPAA also requires HHS to create federal regulations that implement the ideas in the rest of the act. These regulations spell out exactly what healthcare providers must do, and they are now complete and published in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR),

 

Luckily, HHS also grouped these regulations into six sections, called “rules,” and these are really the ultimate HIPAA compliance checklist. If you can understand and comply with each of these six rules, you’ll have a good claim to HIPAA compliance. So let’s do it; let’s count down the checklist that HHS gives us:

The Six Rules of the HIPAA Compliance Checklist:

#1: Standardize Your Coding and Electronic Transmissions

This one is easy. HIPAA seeks to make sure that everybody is communicating about healthcare issues in one unified way, and regulations in its “Transactions and Code Sets” rule accomplish this.

One part of this rule specifies what code sets are allowable for describing medical data, including ICD-CM for conditions, NDC for drug names, and CPT/HCPCS for procedures. Another part then defines and mandates the specific electronic transmission formats that can be used to convey the encoded data.

 HIPAA Checklist: How to Comply with Rule 1

  1. Use a compliant electronic health record (EHR).

Simply pick a modern EHR to use in your practice. They will typically use the correct encoding and transmission formats automatically, and you can confirm this with the vendor before you buy anything.

That’s it. Done. Check.

#2: Get Unique Identifiers for You and Your Organization

In the “Identifier Standards” rule, HIPAA mandates that every individual or organization that renders healthcare have a unique 10-digit National Provider Identifier (NPI). Type 1 NPIs are for individuals, and type 2 NPIs are for organizations. NPIs are used in encoding and transmitting healthcare data, and they help enforce clarity. Two doctors may have the same name and practice in the same city, but their differing NPIs will ensure that they are not mistaken for one another.

 HIPAA Checklist: How to Comply with Rule 2

  1. Make sure that all HIPAA-covered entities in your practice have an NPI.

You probably already have an NPI. If you don’t,  you can get one through the National Plan and Provider Enumeration System (NPPES) that HHS runs.

That’s it. Done. Check.

#3: Protect Your Patients’ Privacy

The HIPAA Privacy Rule, in conjunction with the HIPAA Security Rule, constitutes the most important part of HIPAA for most providers. Fundamentally, the Privacy Rule is all about individuals’ health information, termed “protected health information (PHI).” The rule spells out how healthcare entities may use PHI, and it also delineates patients’ rights to be informed of and control those uses.

HHS has written an important summary of the Privacy Rule, and it’s worth a read. High-level points from the summary to internalize:

  • The Privacy Rule protects all “individually identifiable health information” held or transmitted by a covered entity or its business associate, in any form or media, whether electronic, paper or oral. The Privacy Rule calls this information “PHI.”
  • A central aspect of the Privacy Rule is the principle of “minimum necessary” use and disclosure. A [healthcare] entity must make reasonable efforts to use, disclose, and request only the minimum amount of PHI needed to accomplish [an intended purpose].
  • Except in certain circumstances, individuals have the right to review and obtain a copy of their PHI and any of its uses and disclosures. They may also demand corrections to it.
  • Each [healthcare] entity, with certain exceptions, must provide a notice of its privacy practices.

 HIPAA Checklist: How to Comply with Rule 3

  1. Designate a “privacy official” in your organization who will be tasked with developing and implementing your privacy policies and procedures and ensure that this person is available to receive requests and complaints related to the Privacy Rule.
  2. Understand the definition of PHI and identify information in your practice that is PHI.
  3. Keep a record of all uses and disclosures of PHI in your practice.
  4. Understand the things your practice must do under the Privacy Rule, especially including those things that relate to your patients’ control over their own PHI.
  5. Understand the things your practice may do under the Privacy Rule, especially including those uses and disclosures of PHI that are allowable without explicit, written patient consent. Always use the concept of “minimum necessary” to guide your uses and disclosures.
  6. Identify your “business associates,” as defined by HIPAA. If another company interacts with PHI from your practice, they are likely a business associate, and you need to have a formal “business associate contract” with them that extends the duties of HIPAA to their operations.
  7. Create a Notice of Privacy Practices. This must contain specific items, and it’s best to start with a template that HHS provides. Know when, where, and to whom this notice must be made available.
  8. Implement administrative, technical, and physical safeguards to prevent impermissible intentional or unintentional use or disclosure of PHI. These should also act to limit incidental uses or disclosures.
  9. Ensure ongoing training of your practice’s workforce on your privacy policies and procedures.
  10. Have your privacy official create and maintain a written document of the policies and procedures that you have developed to accomplish the above items.

Well, this section was a bit longer than the first two, but that’s because the Privacy Rule is so crucial to HIPAA. It is, unfortunately, also critical that you review the Privacy Rule yourself. The checklist above is a good start on minimum necessary activities, but there is no perfect, comprehensive checklist that will work for every type of practice. HIPAA is about ensuring best practices in every type of healthcare provider, and there is no substitute for figuring out what that means for you and your exact practice.

HHS states that the Privacy Rule is comprised of 45 CFR Part 160 and Subparts A and E of 45 CFR Part 164, and you can refer to these directly or, at least, to the HHS Privacy Rule summary to make sure that you are creating and following all of the privacy policies and procedures that your specific practice needs.

#4: Secure Your Electronic Medical Information

The HIPAA Security Rule is a nitty-gritty rundown of “the technical and non-technical safeguards that organizations […] must put in place to secure individuals’ electronic PHI.” That quote comes directly from a Security Rule summary that HHS has written, in which they explain that the Security Rule takes the somewhat amorphous concepts of the Privacy Rule and lays out a more exact framework to implement them.

Unlike the Privacy Rule, which applies to all PHI, the Security Rule applies only to PHI that your practice “receives, maintains or transmits in electronic form.” To comply with the Security Rule, your organization must adopt an ongoing process of risk analysis that has the following general form:

  1. Assess risks to electronic PHI in your organization, the current state of your security measures, and any gaps between the two
  2. Implement “administrative, technical, and physical safeguards” to address the gaps
  3. Document all of steps 1 and 2 and keep the records
  4. Repeat steps 1 to 3 on a periodic basis

That’s it, really. And continuing their pattern of being hugely helpful, HHS has created a seven-part educational paper series that will walk you through this. For the checklist in this section, we’ll lean on these papers heavily…since HHS literally provides checklists in them.

 HIPAA Checklist: How to Comply with Rule 4

  1. Perform a risk analysis for electronic PHI in your organization
  2. Implement safeguards to address security gaps identified by the risk analysis:
    1. Administrative
    2. Physical
    3. Technical
  3. Make sure everything is documented appropriately
  4. Repeat steps 1 to 3 on a periodic basis

Each HHS document linked above has a reproduction of Appendix A of the actual Security Rule, which is effectively a checklist of necessary items to consider for the administrative, physical, and technical safeguards that you need. Some of the documents extend this list with other items, such as the document linked in step 3 above.

As with the Privacy Rule, it’s important that you read the Security Rule yourself at least one time. HHS wrote the rules generally so that they could function for organizations of any size, from one person to thousands, and because of this, only you can decide exactly how your organization can best comply. Per HHS, “The Security Rule is located at 45 CFR Part 160 and Subparts A and C of Part 164.” And again, they’ve also written a summary of it.

#5: Understand the Penalties for Violations

The HIPAA Enforcement Rule (codified at 45 CFR Part 160, Subparts C, D, and E) establish procedures for the investigation of possible HIPAA violations and sets civil fines for infractions. Fines can be up to $50,000 per violation per day, so it can add up quickly and is not a joke. Violations can also carry criminal penalties, including fines and jail time, but these are not covered by HHS regulation.

 HIPAA Checklist: How to Comply with Rule 5

  1. You don’t have to do anything ahead of time

If HHS investigates your practice, then this rule becomes relevant to you, but there’s nothing here that you need to do proactively.

#6: Learn How to Handle Information Breaches

The HIPAA Breach Notification Rule (codified at 45 CFR §§ 164.400-414) requires healthcare organizations to provide notification after breaches of PHI. A “breach” is, basically, an impermissible use or disclosure of PHI, as detailed in the HIPAA Privacy Rule. Depending on the type of breach, the notification might need to be made to the affected individuals, the media, or the HHS Secretary. HHS has further guidance available on the topic.

 HIPAA Checklist: How to Comply with Rule 6

  1. You don’t have to do anything ahead of time

Once again, you only need to worry about this rule if you identify a PHI breach, which you should be monitoring for as part of your compliance with the HIPAA Privacy Rule and Security Rule.

 

HIPAA compliance is all about adopting good processes in your organization, and HHS has laid out a path to compliance that is nearly a checklist. All you have to do is follow it.

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Case Management and HIPAA information

Case Management and HIPAA information | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

An employee of the Iowa’s Mahaska County government alleged that another employee committed a HIPAA violation when she locked a member of the public inside a building where files containing PHI were stored unsecured, the Oskaloosa News reported.

 

Kim Newendorp, general assistant director for Mahaska County, told the Board of Supervisors this month that a fellow county employee had locked a member of the public in the Annex Building and left that person alone in the facility.

 

“This person was waiting for me, but in doing so, she left all of the case management confidential and HIPAA information unlocked and accessible to that person. This is a HIPAA violation,” Newendorp told the board.

 

Newendorp said she notified her boss, one of the board members, about the incident but received no response. She then spoke with the county’s chief privacy officer, Jim Blomgren, who passed information about the incident on to the company that handles human resources for the county. No action was taken.

 

Newendorp said that she filed an official grievance with the Board of Supervisors, who passed it onto Blomgren, who then passed it on to the HR people, again with no result.

 

“I’m disappointed this situation has not been handled,” she told the board. “Especially due to the importance of HIPAA. The state DHS official has come forward to say that this situation is an issue, and yet nothing has been done.”

 

“I understand this topic may not be as important to you as roads, 911, and the airport, but I can tell you that the people’s right to have their personal information locked and secured is important to the hundreds of past clients of Mahaska County Case Management, and their families and myself.”

 

Willie Van Weelden, chairman of the Mahaska County Board of Supervisors, said he took action at the time, but declined to say what he specifically did to address Newendorp’s concerns.

Oskaloosa News asked Blomgren to comment on Newendorp’s testimony. “Since the comments of the employee at the meeting of the Board of Supervisors involves personnel issues and alleged HIPAA infractions I do not believe I am at liberty to discuss them,” he responded.

 

“I think in most counties, the board of supervisors, you would never do an investigation into HIPAA. You would never do a human resources investigation. No county I know of would have their board do that,” Paul Greufe of PJ Greufe & Associates told Oskaloosa News.

 

Greufe said that most counties hire professional services such as his to do the HR work and would direct those people to start an investigation. “And so that was the process that was followed to the letter.”

SIMILAR INCIDENT IN BOSTON RESULTS IN OCR REPORT

The incident alleged by Newendorp is similar to one that occurred at the Boston Healthcare for the Homeless Program (BHCHP) earlier this year. In that case, someone was not let into the facililty unattended but broke in.

 

There was unsecured PHI in the facility, but no evidence that the PHI was viewed by the intruder. Still, BHCHP did notify people affected about the incident and reported it to OCR. 

 

The unsecured PHI included handwritten staff notes, printed patient lists, referral forms, and insurance/benefits applications. BHCHP told OCR that 861 individuals were affected by the breach.

BHCHP said it conducted an internal investigation that included a search of the clinic to which the intruder would have had access and interviews with clinic and shelter staff.

 

The program also ensured that the clinic door was secure and implemented additional safety measures, including an additional lock on internal doors within the clinic and secure storage of keys to internal doors, file cabinets, and storage cabinets.

 

BHCHP also updated its policies governing how staff use and store patient information.

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Hospitals Fail at HIPAA Compliance Re Medical Records Requests

Hospitals Fail at HIPAA Compliance Re Medical Records Requests | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Many hospitals failed at HIPAA compliance in response to simulated patients’ requests for medical records, according to a study by Yale researchers published in the JAMA Network Open.

 

The researchers surveyed 83 top-ranked US hospitals with independent medical records request processes and medical records departments reachable by telephone.

 

According to HIPAA, patient requests for medical record must be fulfilled within 30 days of receipt in the format requested by the patient if the records are readily producible in that format. OCR guidance says that hospitals can charge a cost-based fee to provide those records.

 

The researchers conducted scripted interviews with medical records departments in a simulated patient experience and also collected medical records release authorization forms. There was wide variation in the information provided on the authorization forms and from the telephone calls in terms of what data could be requested, release formats, costs, and processing times.

 

On the authorization forms, only 44 hospitals (53%) provided patients the option to acquire the entire medical record. On telephone calls, all 83 hospitals stated that they were able to release entire medical records to patients.

 

There were discrepancies in information given in telephone calls versus authorization forms among the formats hospitals said that they could use to release information: 69 versus 40 for pick up in person, 20 versus 14 for fax, 39 versus 27 for email, 55 versus 35 for CD, and 21 versus 33 for online patient portals. These results demonstrated noncompliance with HIPAA in refusing to provide records in the format requested by the patient, the study noted.

 

There were 48 hospitals that had costs of release above the federal recommendation of $6.50 for electronically maintained records. In one case, a hospital charged $541.50 for a 200-page medical record. At least seven of the hospitals were noncompliant with state requirements for processing times.

 

“Discrepancies in information provided to patients regarding medical records request processes and noncompliance with regulations appear to indicate the need for stricter enforcement of policies relating to patients’ access to their protected health information,” the researchers concluded.

 

The study is timely because the Trump administration has launched the MyHealthEData initiative, which is designed to improve EHR patient data access and use. MyHealthEData is intended to break down the barriers that prevent patients from having electronic access and control over their own health records from the device or application of their choice.

 

In 2017, President Donald Trump issued an executive order in which he directed government agencies to “improve access to and the quality of information that Americans need to make informed healthcare decisions, including data about healthcare prices and outcomes, while minimizing reporting burdens on affected plans, providers, or payers.” The order was part of a broader effort to increase market competition in the healthcare market.

 

“The MyHealthEData initiative will work to make clear that patients deserve to not only electronically receive a copy of their entire health record, but also be able to share their data with whomever they want, making the patient the center of the healthcare system. Patients can use their information to actively seek out providers and services that meet their unique healthcare needs, have a better understanding of their overall health, prevent disease, and make more informed decisions about their care,” explained a March 2018 CMS press release.

 

While the goals of MyHealthEData are lofty, the results of this Yale study call into question the ability of private healthcare organizations to fulfill the Trump administration’s initiative, never mind comply with existing HIPAA patient access requirements.

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How to Keep Your Practice’s Communication HIPAA-Compliant

How to Keep Your Practice’s Communication HIPAA-Compliant | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

HIPAA compliance is a top concern for medical practices, and for good reason–violations can result in serious consequences, including large fines and potentially even jail time. To make things more complicated, the laws themselves tend to be rather vague on what actions practices need to take to become HIPAA-compliant.

Medical practices need to protect private patient data, but they also need to be able to go about the daily business of running a practice as efficiently as possible. Technology can certainly make day-to-day operations more efficient, but new technologies also bring about new concerns with HIPAA compliance. Many practices are hesitant to adopt new technology for that very reason.

When practices do decide that they want to use technology to communicate with patients and other practices, it can be difficult to figure out where to begin because HIPAA laws can be quite vague. Practices don’t want to slip up and have to pay the price (often, quite literally) for a violation.

 

So, what can you do to keep your practice’s communications on the right side of HIPAA guidelines? We highly recommend working with an expert on HIPAA laws to make sure your communication is always compliant.

 

If you’d like to learn more on what HIPAA-compliant communication entails throughout your practice, including marketing efforts, emails, appointment reminders, patient portals, and communication with other practices, we have put together this list of helpful resources to help you stay up to date on the latest recommended best practices for HIPAA-compliant communication.

Emailing Patients

Patients who are always on-the-go may prefer to communicate with you via email. If patients request email communication, you must make that option available to them, but you still need to take the proper precautions to protect your patients and your practice from HIPAA violations.

Appointment Reminders

Even appointment reminders can be considered private health information if done improperly. You may wish to use technology to automate this routine process and free up your employees’ time for other tasks, but you need to make sure that you aren’t inadvertently giving away private patient information in the process.

Patient Portals

Practices are required to implement and use a patient portal to meet Meaningful Use requirements. However, patient portals are still subject to HIPAA laws and may, in fact, pose the greatest security risk of all practice communications because of the amount of information they contain. Always do your research before choosing a vendor for your patient portal to make sure they will keep you covered.

 

Communicating with Other Practices

It’s important for your practice to be able to communicate with your patients’ other health care providers to be able to provide the most comprehensive care possible. However, it can be quite challenging to communicate with other practices in a manner that is both efficient and HIPAA-compliant. These resources include suggestions on improving your communication strategies while protecting private information.

 

The Dangers of Sharing Patient Information via Text/IM

As a healthcare provider, your days are usually very busy, and it’s likely that the doctors you need to communicate with are equally as busy. When you need to share information, whether it’s a quick update on a patient or a request for a consult, it can be tempting to just send a quick text or instant message. If texting/instant messaging is your preferred form of communication with other doctors, you need to approach with caution.

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5 FAQs on HIPAA Compliance In The Cloud

5 FAQs on HIPAA Compliance In The Cloud | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

The Cloud Is Viable For HIPAA Applications
To ensure the protection of patient data, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) lays out guidelines that all companies in the health industry must follow—from primary care providers to data-handling agencies and third-party vendors. HIPAA rules often are complex, however. As a result, some companies inadvertently make mistakes, and others simply remain noncompliant for a variety of other reasons, leaving them subject to penalties that could add up to millions of dollars. Here’s a look at five key FAQs about HIPAA compliance and cloud computing.

 

FAQ 1: What’s Covered Under HIPAA?
The short answer: just about everything. Any piece of data that contains personally identifiable information about a patient, any type of treatment plan, or even aggregate data samples that could be traced back to individuals is covered by HIPAA. Your best bet: Assume everything falls under the scope of the law rather than trying to pick and choose.

 

FAQ 2: Is Cloud Storage Acceptable?
Absolutely. There’s no requirement for HIPAA data to be stored on-site or handled by a specific agency. In fact, it’s not the cloud itself that’s the problem when there is a problem—it’s how data is transmitted, handled, and stored in the cloud that often lands companies in hot water.

 

FAQ 3: What’s the Difference Between Covered Entities and Business Associates?
A covered entity is effectively the “owner” of a health record—for example, the primary care facility that first creates a patient profile or enters test results into its electronic health records system. Business associates, meanwhile, include any other company that handles this data. This means that cloud providers, third parties that offer on-site IT services, or other health agencies that access this data all qualify as business associates.

 

FAQ 4: Who Is Responsible for Health Data in the Cloud?
Ultimately, the covered entity bears responsibility for HIPAA-compliant handling. While business associates also can come under fire for not properly storing or encrypting data in their care, it’s up to the covered entity to ensure they’re able to audit the movement, storage and use of their HIPAA data over time.

 

FAQ 5: What Does “HIPAA Compliant” Really Mean?
While there is no official “HIPAA compliance” standard or certification that providers can obtain, it’s worth looking for other certifications that indicate good data-handling practices, such as PCI-DSS, SSAE 16, ISO 27001 and FIPS 140.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
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