HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices
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HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices
HIPAA Compliance and HIPAA Risk management Articles, Tips and Updates for Medical Practices and Physicians
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HIPAA Regulations for Radiologists 101

HIPAA Regulations for Radiologists 101 | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

HIPAA regulations are a complex set of rules and regulations that are designed to promote a more patient oriented medical system that enhances patient care. HIPAA regulations that promote the accessibility of medical records to patients and increase the security of electronic patient health information are also included in the HIPAA Omnibus Rule. Radiologists often receive patients through a referral system or send patient files to another medical doctor or facility after x-rays and other scans are interpreted. This constant sharing of sensitive patient information makes learning what are HIPAA regulations and how do they affect radiologists an important task for any radiologist.

 

HIPAA Omnibus Rule

The HIPAA Omnibus Rule has changed the way that patient information is collected, stored, transmitted and created in response to the HITECH Act. The HITECH Act offers organizations incentives for using electronic patient health information while improving the security of that data. When asking what are HIPAA regulations one of the most important things to consider is your organization’s privacy policy. New HIPAA regulations state that organizations and entities must update their privacy policies and business agreements to comply with the current standards.

 

Current HIPAA standards require that all businesses sharing patient information must be HIPAA compliant. For instance, if a radiologist receives referrals or bills insurance companies on behalf of clients, the insurance company and the organization referring clients should both be HIPAA compliant. Current business associate agreements will be allowed until late September of 2014, but after that date all business associates will need to comply with the HIPAA Security Rule to avoid penalties or fines.

 

What is Affected by HIPAA?

Nearly every aspect of creating, sharing and transmitting electronic patient health information has been affected by new HIPAA regulations. In addition to revising and updating your organization’s privacy policies and business agreements, you will also need to look at your internal records storage and the accessibility of patient records. For instance, your internal computer systems must be secure and protected from data loss or third-party access. Data encryption is required anytime that you transmit electronic patient information. If your organization is using a third-party storage system for patient health information, the company providing web-based storage services will also need to be HIPAA compliant.

 

One of the areas that will be most affected for radiologists is how patient information is disclosed. Since radiology is a field where referrals are very common, care must be taken to ensure formal, written consent is provided each time you share patient health information. For example, a radiologist sending the results of an x-ray to a general practitioner will need to have written consent by the patient to do so. In order to understand and comply with current HIPAA regulations, it is best to use a HIPAA compliance checklist and HIPAA compliance software. HIPAA compliance software will walk you through the process of meeting current HIPAA regulations and help you avoid the confusion of updating and revising your current policies and practices on your own.
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HIPAA Enforcement Trends for 2017

HIPAA Enforcement Trends for 2017 | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Since the start of 2017 alone, HIPAA enforcement trends have indicated that this could be the most costly year for fines in history.

HIPAA, as a regulation, is managed by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). HHS designs and enacts policy and guidance about emerging trends in health care IT, patient privacy, and data security. The Office for Civil Rights (OCR) is the HHS body responsible for HIPAA enforcement and investigation.

HIPAA Fines by Year

OCR has been cracking down on HIPAA enforcement significantly in the past few years.

Compare these HIPAA fine totals by year:

  • 2015: $6,193,000
  • 2016: $23,504,800
  • 2017: $17,093,200

So far, in the first six months of 2017 alone, fines have increased by almost 300% over 2015’s fine total. And if the trend continues, 2017 is very likely to outpace 2016’s record-breaking $23 million as well.

Why the Increase in HIPAA Enforcement?

When OCR begins a HIPAA investigation for a violation or breach, it can take 3-4 years to reach settlement with the organization under investigation.

Four years ago in 2013, HHS released its Omnibus Rule. The Omnibus Rule made it mandatory for HIPAA business associates to be compliant with HIPAA regulation. For background: a covered entity is a health care provider, and a business associate is a vendor hired by that provider.

In the past year, many of the multi-million dollar fines levied by OCR have been the direct result of BA non-compliance. If a covered entity shares health care information with a BA without first executing a business associate agreement, the sharing of that data is considered a violation of HIPAA and is subject to significant fines. In cases where OCR detects “willful neglect” of HIPAA regulation, fines can reach up to $50,000 per incident.

With HIPAA enforcement trending toward stricter and more severe financial penalties for improper relationships with BAs, it’s no wonder why fines have been steadily increasing year after year. Now that some of the major OCR investigations involving BA non-compliance have started reaching settlement, behavioral health providers need to ensure that their relationships with their vendors are lawful under the HIPAA Omnibus Rule.

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HIPAA Training is not HIPAA Compliance

HIPAA Training is not HIPAA Compliance | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

We hear from so many doctors’ and dentists’ offices that they are “HIPAA-compliant” because they have completed the required annual HIPAA training for their staff.   FALSE! HIPAA Training is not HIPAA Compliance. HIPAA Training is only one of the components of HIPAA Compliance – thinking otherwise could lead to a false sense of security.

 

HIPAA law consists of various requirements in the areas of security and privacy, use and disclosure of PHI (protected health information) and in breach notification rules.

Minimum steps needed for HIPAA Compliance:

At the very minimum, a doctor’s or dentist’s office must do the following for HIPAA Compliance:

  1. Exercise privacy in the office everywhere.   Be careful about accidental disclosure of patient information.
  2. Display the Notice of Privacy Practices prominently in your office lobby and on your website.
  3. Exercise caution in the use and disclosure of PHI (Protected Health Information).     Patients have the right to review and obtain their PHI.   The onus falls on the medical practice to secure and protect PHI from unauthorized disclosure of any kind.
  4. Conduct the mandatory annual risk assessment, or hire an expert to conduct it for you.   The assessor must take into consideration all the security and privacy-related criteria while conducting the assessment, including all your administrative, physical and technical safeguards.   A detailed list of recommendations and action items should follow as a result of the risk assessment.
  5. Prepare and follow security and privacy policies and procedures.   Your risk assessment should highlight the minimum required policies and procedures that you would need to prepare or obtain.   Physicians and staff members should be familiar with and should follow these policies and procedures on a daily basis.
  6. Provide annual HIPAA Training to your staff and physicians.

Breach notification:

Breaches have unfortunately become only too common these days in an environment where medical records are extremely valuable in the black market.   HIPAA law also specifies strict breach notification requirements in the event of a breach.   The Office of Civil Rights (OCR) of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) requires the practice to inform all individuals whose data might have been lost or stolen.  

 

A breach of more than 500 records is considered a reportable breach, that is, the practice must notify HHS.   This could result in an audit of the practice by federal agencies, and the first thing they are going to ask you for is a copy of your last annual risk assessment.

Small practices may be targets of breaches too:

Many small practices think that they are too small to be targeted.   False again!   If you look at the HHS "Wall of Shame" which lists reported breaches of more than 500 patient records, you will see several small practices listed there who have undergone breaches.   The reality is that smaller practices are likely to be even more affected by a breach considering the high expenses and workload that follow.    The Ponemon Institute has calculated the average healthcare data breach cost to be $380 per record - for 500 records, that comes to approximately $190,000, which can be highly damaging for a small healthcare practice.

 

We often hear from dentists that they do not believe they need to comply.   Also False!  In fact, just recently, on January 2018, Steven Yang, DDS of California and Zachary Adkins, DDS of New Mexico had breaches of 3000+ patient records each due to the theft of a laptop and other portable electronic devices respectively.   

 

Robert Smith, DMD of Tennessee reported 1500 records breached after a hack.  Several other providers such as physicians, hospitals, pharmacies, health plans, and business associates have experienced breaches in the recent past.   It can and will happen to anyone regardless of size - please do not think that it won't happen to you!

Culture of Security and Privacy:

HIPAA Training is not HIPAA Compliance.   Practices should take these requirements seriously as they are here to protect patients and medical professionals.   Protect yourself and your patients by incorporating a culture of security and privacy compliance in your medical practice.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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