HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices
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HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices
HIPAA Compliance and HIPAA Risk management Articles, Tips and Updates for Medical Practices and Physicians
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The Benefits of Performing a HIPAA Risk Assessment

The Benefits of Performing a HIPAA Risk Assessment | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Security Rule mandates that covered entities must conduct a risk assessment of their healthcare company.

 

 A wide range of organizations – from healthcare insurance providers to hospitals – fall into this covered entity group. While it may seem taxing and time-consuming to provide standardized training to your employees, there are many reasons doing so can behoove you. For one, it’s the law. Since 2009, Security Risk Assessments (SRAs) have been a required annual practice set forth by the HIPAA Security Rule.

 

Don’t wait to become a breach headline; nip breaches in bud by detecting security issues before they wreak havoc. You can’t be secure if you are not compliant; and a HIPAA Risk Assessment will safeguard your organization in more ways than one. Technology is a timesaver that has simplified the medical filing and billing processes, but it leaves the potential for leaks and hacking.

 

A risk analysis will identify and document potential threats and liabilities that can cause a breach of sensitive data. An IT security consulting company can check all portable media (laptops), desktops, and networks to ensure they’re ironclad. IT security measures, such as encryption and two-factor authentication2, will be addressed in order to make it challenging for unwanted eyes to get a glimpse of patient information.  

 

Employees are the greatest threat to HIPAA compliance, so it’s important to make sure they’re well informed on how to prevent breaches. Annual HIPAA Security Awareness Training Programs provide a thorough understanding of each person’s role in preventing breaches and protecting physical and electronic information.

 

HIPAA training is a regulatory requirement, many employee actions that go awry could easily be prevented. A consultant will offer tips and tricks for minimizing that risk; a few include never leaving work phones and laptops unattended, never sharing passwords or company credentials, choosing to shred files as opposed to trashing them, and overcoming the temptation to “snoop” on patient information without just cause.

 

While many of these suggestions seem like common sense, there are also many lesser known incidences that arise while working in the medical field. Did you know that you cannot access your own medical records using your login credentials? While it may seem innocent enough, everyone is required to submit a request to access medical materials. 

 

Don’t deter a Risk Assessment out of indolence. HIPAA Risk Assessments must be accurate and extremely thorough.  Questions about all the administrative, technical, and physical safeguards an organization has in place must be asked about.

 

If outsourcing your HIPAA Risk Assessment, choose a company that provides comprehensive training courses. No two companies are alike so cookie-cutter answers don’t exist for compliancy; a client-facing doctor’s office and corporate health insurance agency will require that different preventive measures be put into place.

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HIPAA Training is not HIPAA Compliance

HIPAA Training is not HIPAA Compliance | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

We hear from so many doctors’ and dentists’ offices that they are “HIPAA-compliant” because they have completed the required annual HIPAA training for their staff.   FALSE! HIPAA Training is not HIPAA Compliance. HIPAA Training is only one of the components of HIPAA Compliance – thinking otherwise could lead to a false sense of security.

 

HIPAA law consists of various requirements in the areas of security and privacy, use and disclosure of PHI (protected health information) and in breach notification rules.

Minimum steps needed for HIPAA Compliance:

At the very minimum, a doctor’s or dentist’s office must do the following for HIPAA Compliance:

  1. Exercise privacy in the office everywhere.   Be careful about accidental disclosure of patient information.
  2. Display the Notice of Privacy Practices prominently in your office lobby and on your website.
  3. Exercise caution in the use and disclosure of PHI (Protected Health Information).     Patients have the right to review and obtain their PHI.   The onus falls on the medical practice to secure and protect PHI from unauthorized disclosure of any kind.
  4. Conduct the mandatory annual risk assessment, or hire an expert to conduct it for you.   The assessor must take into consideration all the security and privacy-related criteria while conducting the assessment, including all your administrative, physical and technical safeguards.   A detailed list of recommendations and action items should follow as a result of the risk assessment.
  5. Prepare and follow security and privacy policies and procedures.   Your risk assessment should highlight the minimum required policies and procedures that you would need to prepare or obtain.   Physicians and staff members should be familiar with and should follow these policies and procedures on a daily basis.
  6. Provide annual HIPAA Training to your staff and physicians.

Breach notification:

Breaches have unfortunately become only too common these days in an environment where medical records are extremely valuable in the black market.   HIPAA law also specifies strict breach notification requirements in the event of a breach.   The Office of Civil Rights (OCR) of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) requires the practice to inform all individuals whose data might have been lost or stolen.  

 

A breach of more than 500 records is considered a reportable breach, that is, the practice must notify HHS.   This could result in an audit of the practice by federal agencies, and the first thing they are going to ask you for is a copy of your last annual risk assessment.

Small practices may be targets of breaches too:

Many small practices think that they are too small to be targeted.   False again!   If you look at the HHS "Wall of Shame" which lists reported breaches of more than 500 patient records, you will see several small practices listed there who have undergone breaches.   The reality is that smaller practices are likely to be even more affected by a breach considering the high expenses and workload that follow.    The Ponemon Institute has calculated the average healthcare data breach cost to be $380 per record - for 500 records, that comes to approximately $190,000, which can be highly damaging for a small healthcare practice.

 

We often hear from dentists that they do not believe they need to comply.   Also False!  In fact, just recently, on January 2018, Steven Yang, DDS of California and Zachary Adkins, DDS of New Mexico had breaches of 3000+ patient records each due to the theft of a laptop and other portable electronic devices respectively.   

 

Robert Smith, DMD of Tennessee reported 1500 records breached after a hack.  Several other providers such as physicians, hospitals, pharmacies, health plans, and business associates have experienced breaches in the recent past.   It can and will happen to anyone regardless of size - please do not think that it won't happen to you!

Culture of Security and Privacy:

HIPAA Training is not HIPAA Compliance.   Practices should take these requirements seriously as they are here to protect patients and medical professionals.   Protect yourself and your patients by incorporating a culture of security and privacy compliance in your medical practice.

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The Benefits of HIPAA Compliance Services for Physicians

The Benefits of HIPAA Compliance Services for Physicians | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

As a doctor, you have your hands full just taking care of your many patients, running a practice, and providing quality healthcare service. The last thing you need to worry about is whether your practice is being managed properly when it comes to Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) compliance.

 

HIPAA regulations can be complex – at least to an inexperienced or understaffed office management team – and there’s no margin of error for unintended breaches that can lead to costly penalties. That’s why it’s important that your practice utilizes professional HIPAA compliance services that offer these key benefits:

Protection against rampant data breaches

HIPAA data breaches happen at an alarming rate. Employee carelessness is a major contributing factor.  According to the HIPAA JournalData breaches caused by employee carelessness have increased year on year. More unencrypted devices are being lost, data still is being inadvertently disclosed, and simple email errors are still being made. Performing regular training on data privacy and security can help to reduce the number of data breaches suffered.”

 

To reduce – if not eliminate – your risk, you may need on-site compliance experts who are not only able to answer your questions at every step during the process, but who can educate and empower your workforce. These experts can provide real-time advice for best practices for securely handling protected health information, protecting patient privacy, and understandinghow to avoid potential breaches.

A customized HIPAA risk management plan

No two practices are alike. Which is why your HIPAA risk management plan must be unique for your practice. Look for a compliance service provider with decades of experience in internal investigations, regulatory compliance, inspection, facility security, risk mitigation, and health information technology can give your practice an invaluable preventative edge.

Supporting evidence that your practice is exercising due diligence

The greater your medical practice can demonstrate its efforts to exercise reasonable diligence to mitigate risk, the greater your chances of avoiding civil monetary penalties. In the event of a breach of electronic medical records, or if your practice is subjected to a HIPAA compliance investigation, your compliance services provider can provide assistance in sufficiently answering any questions the HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR) may ask about your compliance program.

 

Colington Consulting takes the uncertainty out of what is reasonable and appropriate for HIPAA compliance for your practice. We provide HIPAA risk assessments and on-site facility security surveys by our team of experts. Unlike other service providers that use web-based formats and expect you to answer questions you can hardly understand, we always conduct the assessment, value your input, and use a common-sense approach to compliance.

 

We are experts in the field of HIPAA rules and procedures. Colington Consulting can help you avoid problems and steep fines by bringing your practice into complete HIPAA compliance. It is what we do best, allowing you to do what you do best … provide health care to your patients.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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bizconnect's comment, April 24, 2:53 AM
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HIPAA Audits of Covered Entities and Business Associates

HIPAA Audits of Covered Entities and Business Associates | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

In August, Advocate Health Care Network agreed to pay a $5.55 million settlement with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights (OCR), for multiple HIPAA violations. In addition, HHS also recently announced a $650,000 resolution settlement against the Catholic Health Care Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

 

These multi-million dollar penalties should be a warning for all covered entities or business associates.  Especially, with the next phase of audits now underway. During this phase, OCR is reviewing the policies and procedures utilized by covered entities and their business associates to ensure they meet the standards and specifications of the Privacy, Security, and Breach Notification Rules. These will mostly be desk audits. However, there will be some on-site audits conducted as well.

 

The audit process began in May 2016 when OCR audit sent emails to verify entity’s address and contact information. The next step was a pre-audit questionnaire that was used to gather information about the size, type, and operations of the facilities. Those who participate in the desk audits are required to provide a list of their business associates and their contact information. Emails will go out to the chosen business associates, who are expected to respond promptly. The audits are expected to focus heavily on breach responses. If a business associate does not respond within the timeframe, they will be scheduled in January 2017 for the comprehensive audits.

 

Some frequently asked questions regarding audits include:

Who Will Be Audited?

 

Every covered entity and business associate are eligible for an audit, including covered individual and organizational providers of health services; health plans, health care clearinghouses; and a range of business associates of these entities.

 

What is a Business Associate?

Business associates are considered any third-party contractor that performs work or activities on behalf of a healthcare organization or covered entity that involve the use or disclosure of protected health information.  A few examples may include:

  • Example of business associates: lawyer’s working on a case, a medical transcription or medical billing companies, document storage or disposal companies, answering services, software vendors, and consultants, patient safety and accreditation organizations, health information exchanges, etc.)
  • Examples NOT typically considered business associates: an employee, maintenance or repair personnel, a financial or banking institution that only performs payment activities or a janitorial service. 

 

What are Business Associate Agreements?

HIPAA and HITECH require practices to sign a business associate agreement (BA) with business associates that ensures they will protect all patient's PHI. The contract protects personal health information (PHI) by HIPAA guidelines. Business associates can be held accountable for any data breach and penalized for noncompliance.

 

Why are Business Associates Agreements important?

Business associate contracts are not only necessary for staying in compliance; they are crucial for the adequate protection of patient PHI.  The following are HIPAA requirements for business associate agreements:

  1. Establish the permitted and required uses and disclosures of protected health information by the business associate.
  2. Provide that the business associate will not use or further disclose the information other than as permitted or required by the contract or as required by law.
  3. Require the business associate to implement appropriate safeguards to prevent unauthorized use or disclosure of the information, including implementing requirements of the HIPAA Security Rule about electronic protected health information.
  4. Require the business associate to report to the covered entity any use or disclosure of the information not provided for by its contract, including incidents that constitute breaches of unsecured protected health information.
  5. Require the business associate to disclose protected health information as specified in its contract to satisfy a covered entity’s obligation with respect to individuals' requests for copies of their protected health information, as well as make available protected health information for amendments (and incorporate any amendments, if required) and accountings.
  6. To the extent the business associate is to carry out a covered entity’s obligation under the Privacy Rule, require the business associate to comply with the requirements applicable to the obligation.
  7. Require the business associate to make available to HHS its internal practices, books, and records relating to the use and disclosure of protected health information received from, or created or received by the business associate on behalf of, the covered entity for purposes of HHS determining the covered entity’s compliance with the HIPAA Privacy Rule.
  8. At termination of the contract, if feasible, require the business associate to return or destroy all protected health information received from, or created or received by the business associate on behalf of, the covered entity.
  9. Require the business associate to ensure that any subcontractors it may engage on its behalf that will have access to protected health information agree to the same restrictions and conditions that apply to the business associate with respect to such information.
  10. Authorize termination of the contract by the covered entity if the business associate violates a material term of the contract.  Contracts between business associates and business associates that are subcontractors are subject to these same requirements. (1)

 

How Will Auditees Be Selected?

OCR is identifying groups of covered entities and business associates that represent a broad range of health care providers, health plans, health care clearinghouses and business associates.  According to HHS, the sampling criteria for selection will include the size of the entity, affiliation with other healthcare organizations, the type of entity and its relationship to individuals, whether an organization is public or private, geographic factors, and present enforcement activity with OCR. OCR will not audit entities with an open complaint investigation or that are currently undergoing a compliance review.

 

What If an Entity Doesn’t Respond to OCR’s Requests for Information?

If an entity does not respond to requests for information from OCR, they will utilize publicly available information about the entity to create its audit pool.  An entity that does not respond to OCR may still be selected for an audit or subject to a compliance review.

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What is required for HIPAA Compliance?

What is required for HIPAA Compliance? | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Lots of our visitors ask us “what is required for HIPAA compliance?” Because this is such an important question, we try to direct our visitors to the most trusted sources for HIPAA education. The most important aspect to remember is that a checklist based “solution” is my no means affective. What we do endorse is the ability to use a checklist to understand what aspect of HIPAA you are doing, and to recognize ones you may have looked over or need to address in further detail. We recommend taking a look at Compliancy Group who has two resources for your organization, whether you’re a Covered Entity or a Business Associate. First, we recommend reading and downloading their HIPAA compliance checklist. Or you can register for their HIPAA compliance checklist webinar!

 

Some of the key findings in the checklist highlight Business Associate Agreements, and also help point out the need for more than just a security risk assessment. As many are familiar with there is a need for HIPAA training, but we do appreciate how it points out the need for documentation of training and other attestations.

 

HIPAA Compliance Checklist: What You Need to Know

The divide between what is required for compliance under HIPAA regulation and the misconceptions that healthcare professionals have about being compliant is more extensive than ever. When she was appointed in late 2015, Jocelyn Samuels, director of the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) announced her plan to start on a new wave of audits. Extensively reported upon, these Phase 2 audits are reaffirming that the over $10 million in fines levied against non-compliant Covered Entities (CE’s) and Business Associates (BA’s) seen in 2015 alone is set to become the norm, and perhaps even grow over the coming months.

 

Compliancy Group is here to make sure that you’re not the one being hit with these fines. We’ve compiled this HIPAA checklist to help guide you through some of the most often overlooked components of total HIPAA compliance, and to help ready you for this sweeping new series of audits that OCR has lined up.

 

The HIPAA Compliance Checklist: The Privacy Rule

The HIPAA Privacy & Security Rule is a series of national regulations concerned with safeguarding patients’ PHI and medical records from unauthorized access. It gives patients the primary rights over their own health information. The rule applies to health plans, healthcare clearinghouses, and health care providers that make certain electronic healthcare transactions. These groups are required to have appropriate limitations and conditions on the use and disclosure of PHI.

  • Implement written policies, procedures, and standards of conduct: Ensure that you have written training standards as well as written penalties that employees are informed of in the case of a violation.
  • Have BA agreements in place: When conducting business with a BA, you need to ensure that you have comprehensive, up-to-date agreements in place to protect your firm from liability in the event that a BA breaches HIPAA regulation.
  • Data safeguards: Maintain administrative, technical, and physical safeguards to monitor use or disclosure of PHI.
  • Complaints procedures: Implement procedures where patients can file a complaint to the CE about its HIPAA compliance, and patients must be informed that complaints may also be submitted to HHS.
  • Retaliation and waiver: Retaliation can’t be taken out against a patient who exercises their rights under the Privacy Rule. Patients cannot be made to waive their Privacy Rule rights as a means of obtaining treatment, payment, or enrollment.
  • Documentation and record retention: Records of all privacy policies, privacy practice notices, complaints, remediation plans, and other documentation must be stored and accessible for six years after their initial creation.
  • Privacy personnel: Ensure that an appointed privacy officer is in place to develop and implement the rest of these privacy policies.

 

The HIPAA Compliance Checklist: The Security Rule

The HIPAA Security Rule outlines specific regulations that are meant to prevent breaches in the creation, sharing, storage, and disposal of ePHI. Since its adoption, the rule has been used to manage patients’ confidentiality alongside changing technology. And now, with the growing trends of cloud computing and online and remote document sharing, the protection of ePHI is becoming more important than ever.

 

These safeguards each require different standards that need to be implemented in order to be deemed fully compliant. The legal jargon that surrounds each safeguard and standard can be confusing, so we’ve broken them down into a simple, but comprehensive list below.

 

The HIPAA Security Rule Checklist: Administrative Safeguards

Administrative safeguards should be in place to establish policies and procedures that employees can reference and follow to ensure that they’re maintaining compliance. Each of these standards should be documented as a written policy, accessible to all employees so that they understand the necessary steps they should be taking to maintain patients’ confidentiality.

Standard 1. Security Management Process

 

  • Risk Analysis should be done to assess confidentiality of ePHI
  • Risk Management measures should be implemented to assess potential breaches in ePHI
  • Sanction Policies should be extended to employees who fail to comply with policies and procedures
  • Information System Activity Reviews should be in place so that system activity is regularly monitored

Standard 2. Assigned Security Responsibility

  • Security Responsibility should be assigned to an employee who can regularly monitor, develop, and maintain privacy policies and procedures

Standard 3. Workforce Security

  • Employees who are meant to deal with ePHI should undergo Authorization and Supervision
  • Workforce Clearance Procedures should govern who is and isn’t allowed access to ePHI
  • Termination Procedures should be in place so that employees who have left a practice can no longer have access to ePHI that they’ve previously had access to

Standard 4. Information Access Management

  • Clearinghouses that are part of larger organizations need to have properly Isolated Access to ePHI
  • Employees should be given Access Authorization depending on whether or not their role requires that they handle ePHI
  • Access to ePHI should be governed by strict rules for when and how it is granted, Established, or Modified

Standard 5. Security Awareness and Training

  • Security Reminders should be regularly communicated
  • Protection from Malicious Software should be a priority to prevent ePHI from being compromised
  • Log-in Monitoring should be in place to detect any unauthorized access to ePHI
  • Password Management should be implemented for creating, changing, and protecting employees’ passwords

Standard 6. Security Incident Procedures

  • Breaches and their ramifications need to have documented Response and Reporting procedures

Standard 7. Contingency Plan

  • Data Backup Plan is required to ensure that there are ways to retrieve ePHI that has been lost because of a malfunction or a breach
  • Disaster Recovery Plans should be in place to ensure that any lost ePHI can be fully restored
  • Emergency Mode Operation Plans should be established so that employees can properly access and handle ePHI, while maintaining privacy, in the event of an emergency
  • Contingency procedures should be Tested and Revised on an ongoing basis to address faults or flaws
  • Contingency procedures should be go through Applications and Data Criticality Analysis to ensure that contingency plans are as streamlined as possible

Standard 8. Evaluation

  • The technical and non-technical elements of ePHI security should be regularly Evaluated, particularly when moving offices or changing operations

Standard 9. Business Associate Contracts and Other Arrangements

  • Written Contracts or Other Arrangements need to document that BAs will comply with all ePHI security measures.

 

The HIPAA Security Rule Checklist: Physical Safeguards

Physical safeguards should guide the creation of policies and procedures that focus on protecting electronic systems and ePHI from potential threats, environmental hazards, and unauthorized intrusion. And as is the case with administrative safeguards, each of these standards should be documented as a written policy, accessible to all employees so that they understand the necessary steps they should be taking to maintain patients’ confidentiality.

Standard 1. Facility Access Controls

  • Procedures should be in place to establish Contingency Operations plans that allow access to the physical office and stored data in the event of an emergency
  • Facility Security Plan needs to be well established to protect equipment that stores ePHI from unauthorized access and theft
  • Access Controls and Validation Procedures should govern when, how, and to whom access to equipment is granted
  • Maintenance Records should document modifications to the physical facility such as renovations or changing doors or locks

Standard 2. Workstation Use

  • Workstation Use policies need to specify the use, performance, and physical attributes of equipment and workstations where ePHI is accessed

Standard 3. Workstation Security

  • Workstation Security should entail physical safeguards that govern who can access workstations and equipment where ePHI is accessible

Standard 4. Device and Media Controls

  • Disposal of hardware or equipment where ePHI has been stored needs to be strictly managed
  • Policies should be in place to determine how and when ePHI should be removed from equipment or electronic media before Re-use
  • Hardware and equipment that has access to ePHI should be Accountable and, if necessary, tracked
  • Data Backup and Storage procedures should entail the creation of exact copies of ePHI

 

The HIPAA Security Rule Checklist: Technical Safeguards

Technical safeguards are the last piece of the Security Rule. They’re meant to provide written, accessible, policies and procedures that monitor user access to systems that store ePHI.

Standard 1. Access Control

  • Employees should be granted Unique User Identification in the form of a username or ID number that can be used to identify and track system usage
  • Procedures should be in place that determine Emergency Access protocols and authorization
  • Systems that store ePHI should be built with an Automatic Logoff function after inactivity
  • Encryption and Decryption methods should be built into systems that store ePHI

Standard 2. Audit Controls

  • Audit Controls must regularly monitor, record, and store system usage and ePHI access

Standard 3. Integrity

  • In order to ensure that ePHI hasn’t been accessed, altered, or destroyed without authorization, a Mechanism to Authenticate ePHI should be built into the system

Standard 4. Person or Entity Authentication

  • Person or Entity Authentication needs to be in place to ensure that only authorized employees or users have access to certain data and ePHI

Standard 5. Transmission Security

  • Any ePHI that is transmitted electronically needs to be protected by Integrity Controls to ensure that it hasn’t been modified in the process
  • Any stored ePHI should be Encrypted
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The Easiest Complete HIPAA Compliance Checklist You'll Ever See

The Easiest Complete HIPAA Compliance Checklist You'll Ever See | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it
The Best HIPAA Checklist Is…HIPAA Itself?

Yes, basically. First, let’s make sure we’re on the same page about what HIPAA is exactly. HIPAA is federal legislation, as is the HITECH act that updated parts of it. Title II of that legislation relates to the privacy and security of protected health information, and this is the meat of what most physicians need to care about when “HIPAA compliance” comes up.

 

Title II of HIPAA also requires HHS to create federal regulations that implement the ideas in the rest of the act. These regulations spell out exactly what healthcare providers must do, and they are now complete and published in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR),

 

Luckily, HHS also grouped these regulations into six sections, called “rules,” and these are really the ultimate HIPAA compliance checklist. If you can understand and comply with each of these six rules, you’ll have a good claim to HIPAA compliance. So let’s do it; let’s count down the checklist that HHS gives us:

The Six Rules of the HIPAA Compliance Checklist:

#1: Standardize Your Coding and Electronic Transmissions

This one is easy. HIPAA seeks to make sure that everybody is communicating about healthcare issues in one unified way, and regulations in its “Transactions and Code Sets” rule accomplish this.

One part of this rule specifies what code sets are allowable for describing medical data, including ICD-CM for conditions, NDC for drug names, and CPT/HCPCS for procedures. Another part then defines and mandates the specific electronic transmission formats that can be used to convey the encoded data.

 HIPAA Checklist: How to Comply with Rule 1

  1. Use a compliant electronic health record (EHR).

Simply pick a modern EHR to use in your practice. They will typically use the correct encoding and transmission formats automatically, and you can confirm this with the vendor before you buy anything.

That’s it. Done. Check.

#2: Get Unique Identifiers for You and Your Organization

In the “Identifier Standards” rule, HIPAA mandates that every individual or organization that renders healthcare have a unique 10-digit National Provider Identifier (NPI). Type 1 NPIs are for individuals, and type 2 NPIs are for organizations. NPIs are used in encoding and transmitting healthcare data, and they help enforce clarity. Two doctors may have the same name and practice in the same city, but their differing NPIs will ensure that they are not mistaken for one another.

 HIPAA Checklist: How to Comply with Rule 2

  1. Make sure that all HIPAA-covered entities in your practice have an NPI.

You probably already have an NPI. If you don’t,  you can get one through the National Plan and Provider Enumeration System (NPPES) that HHS runs.

That’s it. Done. Check.

#3: Protect Your Patients’ Privacy

The HIPAA Privacy Rule, in conjunction with the HIPAA Security Rule, constitutes the most important part of HIPAA for most providers. Fundamentally, the Privacy Rule is all about individuals’ health information, termed “protected health information (PHI).” The rule spells out how healthcare entities may use PHI, and it also delineates patients’ rights to be informed of and control those uses.

HHS has written an important summary of the Privacy Rule, and it’s worth a read. High-level points from the summary to internalize:

  • The Privacy Rule protects all “individually identifiable health information” held or transmitted by a covered entity or its business associate, in any form or media, whether electronic, paper or oral. The Privacy Rule calls this information “PHI.”
  • A central aspect of the Privacy Rule is the principle of “minimum necessary” use and disclosure. A [healthcare] entity must make reasonable efforts to use, disclose, and request only the minimum amount of PHI needed to accomplish [an intended purpose].
  • Except in certain circumstances, individuals have the right to review and obtain a copy of their PHI and any of its uses and disclosures. They may also demand corrections to it.
  • Each [healthcare] entity, with certain exceptions, must provide a notice of its privacy practices.

 HIPAA Checklist: How to Comply with Rule 3

  1. Designate a “privacy official” in your organization who will be tasked with developing and implementing your privacy policies and procedures and ensure that this person is available to receive requests and complaints related to the Privacy Rule.
  2. Understand the definition of PHI and identify information in your practice that is PHI.
  3. Keep a record of all uses and disclosures of PHI in your practice.
  4. Understand the things your practice must do under the Privacy Rule, especially including those things that relate to your patients’ control over their own PHI.
  5. Understand the things your practice may do under the Privacy Rule, especially including those uses and disclosures of PHI that are allowable without explicit, written patient consent. Always use the concept of “minimum necessary” to guide your uses and disclosures.
  6. Identify your “business associates,” as defined by HIPAA. If another company interacts with PHI from your practice, they are likely a business associate, and you need to have a formal “business associate contract” with them that extends the duties of HIPAA to their operations.
  7. Create a Notice of Privacy Practices. This must contain specific items, and it’s best to start with a template that HHS provides. Know when, where, and to whom this notice must be made available.
  8. Implement administrative, technical, and physical safeguards to prevent impermissible intentional or unintentional use or disclosure of PHI. These should also act to limit incidental uses or disclosures.
  9. Ensure ongoing training of your practice’s workforce on your privacy policies and procedures.
  10. Have your privacy official create and maintain a written document of the policies and procedures that you have developed to accomplish the above items.

Well, this section was a bit longer than the first two, but that’s because the Privacy Rule is so crucial to HIPAA. It is, unfortunately, also critical that you review the Privacy Rule yourself. The checklist above is a good start on minimum necessary activities, but there is no perfect, comprehensive checklist that will work for every type of practice. HIPAA is about ensuring best practices in every type of healthcare provider, and there is no substitute for figuring out what that means for you and your exact practice.

HHS states that the Privacy Rule is comprised of 45 CFR Part 160 and Subparts A and E of 45 CFR Part 164, and you can refer to these directly or, at least, to the HHS Privacy Rule summary to make sure that you are creating and following all of the privacy policies and procedures that your specific practice needs.

#4: Secure Your Electronic Medical Information

The HIPAA Security Rule is a nitty-gritty rundown of “the technical and non-technical safeguards that organizations […] must put in place to secure individuals’ electronic PHI.” That quote comes directly from a Security Rule summary that HHS has written, in which they explain that the Security Rule takes the somewhat amorphous concepts of the Privacy Rule and lays out a more exact framework to implement them.

Unlike the Privacy Rule, which applies to all PHI, the Security Rule applies only to PHI that your practice “receives, maintains or transmits in electronic form.” To comply with the Security Rule, your organization must adopt an ongoing process of risk analysis that has the following general form:

  1. Assess risks to electronic PHI in your organization, the current state of your security measures, and any gaps between the two
  2. Implement “administrative, technical, and physical safeguards” to address the gaps
  3. Document all of steps 1 and 2 and keep the records
  4. Repeat steps 1 to 3 on a periodic basis

That’s it, really. And continuing their pattern of being hugely helpful, HHS has created a seven-part educational paper series that will walk you through this. For the checklist in this section, we’ll lean on these papers heavily…since HHS literally provides checklists in them.

 HIPAA Checklist: How to Comply with Rule 4

  1. Perform a risk analysis for electronic PHI in your organization
  2. Implement safeguards to address security gaps identified by the risk analysis:
    1. Administrative
    2. Physical
    3. Technical
  3. Make sure everything is documented appropriately
  4. Repeat steps 1 to 3 on a periodic basis

Each HHS document linked above has a reproduction of Appendix A of the actual Security Rule, which is effectively a checklist of necessary items to consider for the administrative, physical, and technical safeguards that you need. Some of the documents extend this list with other items, such as the document linked in step 3 above.

As with the Privacy Rule, it’s important that you read the Security Rule yourself at least one time. HHS wrote the rules generally so that they could function for organizations of any size, from one person to thousands, and because of this, only you can decide exactly how your organization can best comply. Per HHS, “The Security Rule is located at 45 CFR Part 160 and Subparts A and C of Part 164.” And again, they’ve also written a summary of it.

#5: Understand the Penalties for Violations

The HIPAA Enforcement Rule (codified at 45 CFR Part 160, Subparts C, D, and E) establish procedures for the investigation of possible HIPAA violations and sets civil fines for infractions. Fines can be up to $50,000 per violation per day, so it can add up quickly and is not a joke. Violations can also carry criminal penalties, including fines and jail time, but these are not covered by HHS regulation.

 HIPAA Checklist: How to Comply with Rule 5

  1. You don’t have to do anything ahead of time

If HHS investigates your practice, then this rule becomes relevant to you, but there’s nothing here that you need to do proactively.

#6: Learn How to Handle Information Breaches

The HIPAA Breach Notification Rule (codified at 45 CFR §§ 164.400-414) requires healthcare organizations to provide notification after breaches of PHI. A “breach” is, basically, an impermissible use or disclosure of PHI, as detailed in the HIPAA Privacy Rule. Depending on the type of breach, the notification might need to be made to the affected individuals, the media, or the HHS Secretary. HHS has further guidance available on the topic.

 HIPAA Checklist: How to Comply with Rule 6

  1. You don’t have to do anything ahead of time

Once again, you only need to worry about this rule if you identify a PHI breach, which you should be monitoring for as part of your compliance with the HIPAA Privacy Rule and Security Rule.

 

HIPAA compliance is all about adopting good processes in your organization, and HHS has laid out a path to compliance that is nearly a checklist. All you have to do is follow it.

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How HIPAA Helps Strengthen Patient Trust

How HIPAA Helps Strengthen Patient Trust | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Trust is a vital factor that affects the success of any relationship, whether it be personal or professional. Without this foundational element, interpersonal and business relationships would be filled with suspicion and uncertainty leading to conflict and ultimately the disintegration of any bond that existed.

 

In today’s digitally-driven world, this core human value is now more critical than ever. Many of the transactions we perform daily force us to deal with entities we have never met in real life. Dealing with any organization that processes and stores our personal data requires us to trust that they will honor their commitments and keep our sensitive information secure.

 

When it comes to healthcare, patient trust is a core element of any practice. Any incident that jeopardizes patient trust can destroy the relationship and threaten the future of the organization.  As people are effectively placing their health and welfare under the direct care of a practitioner, trust is effectively the only human emotion at play in this relationship.

 

We not only trust them with our lives but with keeping our medical information private and secure. Should this data be compromised in any way, it would not only place the patient in a precarious position but would also destroy the trust relationship that existed with the practitioner.

HIPAA Strengthens Patient Trust

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) helps strengthen patient trust in various ways. It provides mechanisms that enhance the transparency, privacy, and security of electronic healthcare information. Not only does the Act help prevent sensitive patient data from compromise, but it also gives patients access and protects their private medical information.

 

Under HIPAA, medical organizations and practitioners that process and store patient healthcare information must implement measures that ensure compliance with the obligations stipulated under the statute.

 

Some of these measures include conducting regular security risk assessments and deploying technologies that protect access to patient information such as Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA) and encryption.

 

Complying with the provisions specified under HIPAA should not only be seen as a legal or regulatory obligation but as accreditation that the organization takes patient confidentiality and security seriously. It helps build that vital trust factor as patients know that the entity has implemented the necessary safeguards needed to protect the privacy of their sensitive medical information. Achieving HIPAA compliance should therefore not be seen as a regulatory obligation but as an essential business practice that builds patient trust.

The Healthcare Industry is Not Immune to Cybersecurity Risks

As the world has become more digital and many of the vital services that run our lives have moved online, cybersecurity is a fundamental principle that every organization needs to put into practice. No enterprise is immune from a cyberattack, and this fact is particularly true for organizations that operate in the healthcare industry.

 

According to the 2018 Verizon Protected Health Information Data Breach Report, 58% of incidents involved insiders. This statistic highlighted the fact that healthcare is the leading industry in which internal actors are the biggest threat to an organization. It’s interesting to note that the majority of these incidents involved human error.

 

Although malicious actions such as misuse of information, physical intrusion, and hacking also contributed to breaches involving the healthcare industry, human error was a leading cause of data compromise. These statistics show the vital role HIPAA can play in helping organizations reduce the risk of data breaches involving protected health information.

How to Comply with HIPAA Rules

HIPAA compliance is not a one time exercise but an ongoing assessment that involves a synchronized endeavor involving people, processes, and technology. As human error is the leading cause of data breaches in the healthcare industry, it is vitally important to implement the safeguards that HIPAA has created to reduce the risk of intentional or accidental compromise of patient healthcare information.

 

Under HIPAA, there are specific obligations that are required and others that are addressable. Required safeguards are mandatory for any organization that stores, processes, or transmits electronically protected healthcare information. Addressable provisions are not mandatory, but organizations need to either implement these or provide evidence that shows that these are not relevant to their specific circumstances.

 

The HIPAA Privacy Rule deals with protected health information (PHI) in general.  The HIPAA Security Rule provides compliance regulations for electronic PHI (ePHI). Under this section of the Act, there are various administrative, physical, and technical safeguards that offer the appropriate measures healthcare organizations need to implement to ensure patient privacy and the security of their ePHI.

 

Administrative safeguards include actions such as undertaking risk analysis and performing an information system activity review. It also recommends that organizations conduct regular cybersecurity awareness training and create an incident response plan.

 

Physical safeguards include measures such as deploying facility access controls and implementing the necessary steps to securely and safely dispose of media that contain ePHI.

Finally, the technical safeguards specified under HIPAA’s security rule include legislative obligations that healthcare organizations need to implement such as ensuring unique user identification, creating an emergency access procedure, and installing technologies that provide data integrity and transmission security.

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Six Common HIPAA Violations and how you can prevent them

Six Common HIPAA Violations and how you can prevent them | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

HIPAA compliance is an ongoing process.  Do you have security and privacy policies and procedures for your organization?  Do you review your policies and procedures periodically? Is your HIPAA training planned for new employees and to update everyone as necessary?  Do you know where the gaps are in your data security and do you have a plan to address these gaps?  Do your vendors and their staff follow a culture of privacy?

 

Our Managing director, Rema Deo has created a list of the top 6 HIPAA Violations 24By7Security staff have found, based on over 500 security risk assessments conducted by our security analysts for healthcare organizations ranging from one doctor practices to multi-location hospitals.  This list of HIPAA violations comes complete with appropriate risk mitigation recommendations that can help you in your organization. 

  

1. Lack of Business Associate Agreements (BAAs) with your vendors

Often healthcare organizations, especially the smaller to medium sized medical practices, fail to enter into Business Associate Agreements with their vendors or business associates. These vendors could range from a small IT vendor to large Electronic Health Record System (EHR).  Sometimes, smaller practices use free insecure email and even use insecure email to share or communicate PHI. This puts them at unnecessary risk.  Healthcare providers should also note that business associate agreements should be dated after the Omnibus Final Rule came into effect, i.e. after January 2013.   

How can you mitigate this risk when it comes to Business Associate Agreements?

  1. Prevent this risk by getting HIPAA-compliant Business Associate Agreements signed with all your vendors or business associates who have access to PHI.
  2. Be sure to always use secure means of transmission of PHI, and enter into a Business Associate Agreement with the vendors who are providing this secure transmission.  For example, secure email providers, external cloud storage solutions, EHR systems, and such providers usually have HIPAA-compliant service options where they provide business associate agreements.

 

2. Loss or theft of portable devices

Many covered entities take insufficient steps to safeguard PHI especially on thumb drives and other portable devices. The Office of Civil Rights (OCR) is clear that loss of PHI is not considered a breach if it is properly encrypted.

Mitigate your risk in case devices are lost or stolen

  1. Covered entities must ensure that their portable devices, thumb drives, laptops, computers and servers are all encrypted.
  2. Drives, storage devices and other portable devices storing PHI must be kept locked when not in use.
  3. Develop, implement and maintain an appropriate data backup policy.  Ensure that backups are encrypted as well.

 

3. Failure to complete an enterprise-wide Risk Analysis

OCR has also often found that failure to complete an enterprise-wide risk analysis is a HIPAA violation, and they have levied significant penalties and fines on entities who could not show evidence of having completed an enterprise-wide risk analysis.  The case of the large fine imposed on Anthem recently is an example of this.  We mentioned this breach and the monumental price tag that came with it in our October Newsletter.

Mitigate your risk of fines in the event of an audit

  1. All areas of the enterprise should be covered with periodic, thorough enterprise-wide security risk analysis.
  2. The risk assessment or analysis should be repeated periodically and after any major changes. We recommend doing this annually as a best practice.
  3. Review your findings from the Risk Analysis and prepare an action plan with remediation plans and target dates.

 

4. Insufficient physical safeguards or keeping PHI unlocked or easily accessible

Paper files are often kept unlocked. This practice carries a risk of penalties if your data is breached.

Mitigate your risk of unauthorized PHI access

  1. We recommend keeping paper files with PHI locked 
  2. IT closets/ network/ security/ server equipment should also be kept locked to prevent unauthorized access.

 

5. Lack of HIPAA security and privacy policies and procedures. 

Often covered entities do not maintain and implement satisfactory HIPAA security and privacy policies and procedures.  Or even if they have policies and procedures, not all of them review and update their policies and procedures periodically. 

Mitigate your risk

  1. Take the time to prepare and maintain policies and procedures.
  2. Review these policies and procedures annually or after a major change.
  3. Ensure that employees are trained on your policies and procedures, and follow them.

 

6. Delays in reporting breaches as per the breach notification rule.

Breaches affecting more than 500 patients are required to be reported to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) within 60 days of being discovered.  It’s bad enough to delay reporting to HHS, but covered entities may often not be aware of state-level breach notification requirements.  Some states like Florida can be very strict with breach notification delays. Florida, under the Florida Information Protection Act, has 30-day breach notification requirements and other specific rules depending on the number of records breached. The fines are also drastic, an example being $1000 per day for every day late for the first 30 days and more stringent penalties after that. All 50 states have enacted laws regarding breach notification.

Mitigate your risk of penalties for failing to report breaches in a timely manner

  1. If you suffer a breach, be sure to take legal advice in terms of all the requirements in your industry and location.
  2. Ensure that you are aware and comply with your state or location specific breach reporting requirements in addition to federal HIPAA breach notification rules.
  3. Cyber Insurance can help mitigate some of the expenses of a breach, but take a close look at what is covered and what you need to be doing in order to maintain coverage.

Don't risk making one of these costly mistakes!  Schedule your HIPAA risk assessment, HIPAA training for you and your staff, and prepare and/ or review your Policies and Procedures. 

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How Do I Become HIPAA Compliant?

How Do I Become HIPAA Compliant? | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

For healthcare providers, HIPAA compliance is a must. HIPAA guidelines protect patients’ health information, ensuring that it is stored securely, and used correctly.

 

Sensitive data that can reveal a patient’s identity must be kept confidential to adhere to HIPAA rules. These rules work on multiple levels and require a specific organizational method to implement comprehensive privacy and security policies to achieve compliance.

 

Most organizations find this to be a daunting task. We have put together a HIPAA compliance checklist to make the process easier.

 

The first is to understand how HIPAA applies to your organization. The second is to learn how to implement an active process, technology, and training to prevent a HIPAA-related data breach or accidental disclosure. Finally, the third is to put physical and technical safeguards in place to protect patient data.

By the time you’re done with our list, you will know what you need to consider to have a better conversation with your compliance advisors.

What is HIPAA?

Before talking about compliance, let’s recap the basics of HIPAA.

Signed into law by President Bill Clinton in 1996, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act provides rules and regulations for medical data protection.

HIPAA does several important things. It reduces health care abuse and fraud and sets security standards for electronic billing of healthcare. It also does the same for the storage of patients’ healthcare information. The Act mandates the protection and handling of medical data, ensuring that healthcare data is kept private.

The part of HIPAA we are concerned with relates to healthcare cybersecurity. To be compliant, you must protect patients’ confidential records.

HIPAA rules have evolved. When the law was first enacted, it did not mention specific technology. As the HIPAA compliant cloud has become commonplace, it has inspired additional solutions. For example, our Data Security Cloud (DSC) is being developed to create a base infrastructure for a HIPAA compliant solution. Providing a secure infrastructure platform to ride on top of, DSC makes creating a HIPAA-compliant environment easier.

Secure infrastructure handles things at the lowest technical level that creates data, providing the key features to keep data safe. These features include separation/segmentation, encryption at rest, a secure facility at the SOC2 level of compliance, and strict admin controls among other required security capabilities.

 
 

Why Is HIPAA Compliance Important?

HIPAA compliance guidelines are incredibly essential. Failure to comply can put patients’ health information at risk. Breaches can have a disastrous impact on a company’s reputation, and you could be subject to disciplinary action and strict violation fines and penalties by CMS/OCR.

Last year’s Wannacry ransomware attack affected more than 200,000 computers worldwide, including many healthcare organizations. Most notably, it affected Britain’s National Health Service, causing serious disruptions in the delivery of health services across the country.

To gain access to the systems, hackers exploited vulnerabilities in outdated versions of Windows that are still commonly used in many healthcare organizations. With medical software providers offering inadequate support for new OS’s and with medical devices such as MRIs lacking security controls, the attack was easy to carry out.

The attack demonstrated the strength of today’s hackers, highlighting the extent to which outdated technologies can pose a problem in modern organizations. This is precisely why HIPAA also regulates some aspects of technology systems used to store, manage, and transfer healthcare information.

The institutions that fail to implement adequate systems can suffer significant damage. If a breach takes place, the law requires affected organizations to submit various disclosure documents, which can include sending every subject a mailed letter. They may also be required to offer patients a year of identity protection services.  This can add up to significant dollars, even before confirming the extent of the breach.

 

What is the HIPAA Privacy Rule?

The HIPAA Privacy Rule creates national standards. Their goal is to protect medical records and other personally identifiable health information (PHI).

It applies to three types of companies: providers, supply chain (contractors, vendors, etc.) and now service providers (such as data centers and cloud services providers). All health plans and healthcare clearinghouses must be HIPAA compliant.

The rules also apply to healthcare providers who conduct electronic health-related transactions.

The Privacy Rule requires that providers put safeguards in place to protect their patients’ privacy. The safeguards must shield their PHI. The HIPAA Privacy Rule also sets limits on the disclosure of ePHI.

It’s because of the Privacy Rule that patients have legal rights over their health information.

These include three fundamental rights.

    • First, the right to authorize disclosure of their health information and records.
    • Second, the right to request and examine a copy of their health records at any time.
    • Third, patients have the right to request corrections to their records as needed.

The HIPAA Privacy Act requires providers to protect patients’ information. It also provides patients with rights regarding their health information.

 

What Is The HIPAA Security Rule

The HIPAA Security Rule is a subset of the HIPAA Privacy Rule. It applies to electronic protected health information (ePHI), which should be protected if it is created, maintained, received, or used by a covered entity.

The safeguards of the HIPAA Security Rule are broken down into three main sections. These include technical, physical, and administrative safeguards.

Entities affected by HIPAA must adhere to all safeguards to be compliant.

Technical Safeguards

The technical safeguards included in the HIPAA Security Rule break down into four categories.

    • First is access control. These controls are designed to limit access to ePHI. Only authorized persons may access confidential information.
    • Second is audit control. Covered entities must use hardware, software, and procedures to record ePHI. Audit controls also ensure that they are monitoring access and activity in all systems that use ePHI.
    • Third are integrity controls. Entities must have procedures in place to make sure that ePHI is not destroyed or altered improperly. These must include electronic measures to confirm compliance.
    • Finally, there must be transmission security. Covered entities must protect ePHI whenever they transmit or receive it over an electronic network.

The technical safeguards require HIPAA-compliant entities to put policies and procedures in place to make sure that ePHI is secure. They apply whether the ePHI is being stored, used, or transmitted.

Physical Safeguards

Covered entities must also implement physical safeguards to protect ePHI. The physical safeguards cover the facilities where data is stored, and the devices used to access them.

Facility access must be limited to authorized personnel. Many companies already have security measures in place. If you don’t, you’ll be required to add them. Anybody who is not considered an authorized will be prohibited from entry.

Workstation and device security are also essential. Only authorized personnel should have access to and use of electronic media and workstations.

Security of electronic media must also include policies for the disposal of these items. The removal, transfer, destruction, or re-use of such devices must be processed in a way that protects ePHI.

Administrative Safeguards

The third type of required safeguard is administrative. These include five different specifics.

    • First, there must be a security management process. The covered entity must identify all potential security risks to ePHI. It must analyze them. Then, it must implement security measures to reduce the risks to an appropriate level.
    • Second, there must be security personnel in place. Covered entities must have a designated security official. The official’s job is to develop and implement HIPAA-related security policies and procedures.
    • Third, covered entities must have an information access management system. The Privacy Rule limits the uses and disclosures of ePHI. Covered entities must put procedures in place that restrict access to ePHI to when it is appropriate based on the user’s role.
    • Fourth, covered entities must provide workforce training and management. They must authorize and supervise any employees who work with ePHI. These employees must get training in the entity’s security policies. Likewise, the entity must sanction employees who violate these policies.
    • Fifth, there must be an evaluation system in place. Covered entities must periodically assess their security policies and procedures.

Who Must Be HIPAA complaint?

There are four classes of business that must adhere to HIPAA rules. If your company fits one of them, you must take steps to comply.

The first class is health plans. These include HMOs, employer health plans, and health maintenance companies. This class contains schools who handle PHI for students and teachers. It also covers both Medicare and Medicaid.

The second class is healthcare clearinghouses. These include healthcare billing services and community, health management information systems. Also included are any entities that collect information from healthcare entities and process it into an industry-standard format.

The third class is healthcare providers. That means any individual or organization that treats patients. Examples include doctors, surgeons, dentists, podiatrists, and optometrists. It also includes lab technicians, hospitals, group practices, pharmacies, and clinics.

The final class is for business associates of the other three levels. It covers any company that handles ePHI such as contractors, and infrastructure services providers. Most companies’ HR departments also fall into this category because they handle ePHI of their employees. Additional examples include data processing firms and data transmission providers. This class also includes companies that store or shred documents. Medical equipment companies, transcription services, accountants, and auditors must also comply.

If your entity fits one of these descriptions, then you must take steps to comply with HIPAA rules.

What is the HIPAA Breach Notification Rule?

Even when security measures are in place, it’s possible that a breach may occur. If it does, the HIPAA Breach Notification Rule specifies how covered entities should deal with it.

The first thing you need to know is how to define a breach. A breach is a use or disclosure of PHI forbidden by the Privacy Rule.

The covered entity must assess the risk using these criteria:

    1. The nature of the PHI involved, including identifying information and the likelihood of re-identification;
    2. The identity of the unauthorized person who received or used the PHI;
    3. Whether the PHI was viewed or acquired; and
    4. The extent to which the risk to the PHI has been mitigated.

Sometimes, PHI may be acquired or disclosed without a breach.

The HIPAA rules specify three examples.

  • The first is when PHI is unintentionally acquired by an employee or person who acted in good faith and within the scope of their authority.
  • The second is inadvertent disclosure of PHI by one authorized person to another. The information must not be further disclosed or used in a way not covered by the Privacy Rule.
  • The third occurs if the covered entity determines that the unauthorized person who received the disclosure would not be able to retain the PHI.

 

If there is a breach as defined above, the entity must disclose it. The disclosures advise individuals and HHS that the breach has occurred.

 

Personal disclosures must be mailed or emailed to those affected by the breach. A media disclosure must be made in some circumstances. If more than 500 people in one area are affected, the media must be notified.

 

Finally, there must also be a disclosure to the HHS Secretary.

The HIPAA Breach Notification Rule protects PHI by holding covered entities accountable. It also ensures that patients are notified if their personal health information has been compromised.

 

What Are The HIPAA Requirements for Compliance

The common question is, how to become HIPAA compliant?

The key to HIPAA compliance certification is to take a systematic approach. If your entity is covered by HIPAA rules, you must be compliant. You must also perform regular audits and updates as needed.

 

With that in mind, we’ve compiled a comprehensive checklist for use in creating your HIPAA compliance policy.

HIPAA Compliance Checklist

These questions cover the components to make you are HIPAA-compliant. You can use the checklist to mark each task as you accomplish it. The list is intended to be used for self-evaluation.

Have you conducted the necessary audits and assessments according to National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST) Guidelines?

 

The audits in question involve security risk assessments, privacy assessments, and administrative assessments.

Have you identified all the deficiencies and issues discovered during the three audits?

 

There are several things to consider before doing the self-audit checklist. You need to ensure that all security, privacy, and administrative deficiencies and issues are appropriately addressed.

 

Have you created thorough remediation plans to address the deficiencies you have identified?

After covering the deficiencies and issues mentioned above, you need to provide remediation for each group.

Do you have policies and procedures in place that are relevant to the HIPAA Privacy Rule, the HIPAA Security Rule, and the HIPAA Breach Notification Rule?

 

You must be aware of these three critical aspects of a HIPAA compliance program and ensure each is adequately addressed.

    • Have you distributed the policies and procedures specified to all staff members?
      • Have all staff members read and attested to the HIPAA policies and procedures you have put in place?
      • Have you documented their attestation, so you can prove that you have distributed the rules?
      • Do you have documentation for annual reviews of your HIPAA policies and procedures?
    • Have all your staff members gone through basic HIPAA compliance training?
      • Have all staff members completed HIPAA training for employees?
      • Do you have documentation of their training?
      • Have you designated a staff member as the HIPAA Compliance, Privacy, or Security Officer as required by law?
    • Have you identified all business associates as defined under HIPAA rules?
      • Have you identified all associates who may receive, transmit, maintain, process, or have access to ePHI?
      • Do you have a Business Associate Agreement (Business Associate Contract) in place with each identify you have identified as a Business Associate?
      • Have you audited your Business Associates to make sure they are compliant with HIPAA rules?
      • Do you have written reports to prove your due diligence regarding your Business Associates?
    • Do you have a management system in place to handle security incidents or breaches?
      • Do you have systems in place to allow you to track and manage investigations of any incidents that impact the security of PHI?
      • Can you demonstrate that you have investigated each incident?
      • Can you provide reporting of all breaches and incidents, whether they are minor or meaningful?
      • Is there a system in place so staff members may anonymously report an incident if the need arises?

As you work your way through this checklist, remember to be thorough. You must be able to provide proper documentation of your audits, procedures, policies, training, and breaches.

As a final addition to our checklist, here is a review of the general instructions regarding a HIPAA compliance audit.

    • If a document refers to an entity, it means both the covered entity and all business associates unless otherwise specified
    • Management refers to the appropriate officials designated by the covered entity to implement policies, procedures, and standards under HIPAA rules.
    • The covered entity must provide all specified documents to the auditor. A compendium of all entity policies is not acceptable. It is not the auditor’s job to search for the requested information.
    • Any documents provided must be the versions in use as of the audit notification and document request unless otherwise specified.
    • Covered entities or business associates must submit all documents via OCR’s secure online web portal in PDF, MS Word, or MS Excel.
    • If the appropriate documentation of implementation is not available, the covered entity must provide examples from “equivalent previous time periods” to complete the sample. If no such documentation is available, a written statement must be provided.
    • Workforce members include:
      • Entity employees
      • On-site contractors
      • Students
      • Volunteers
    • Information systems include:
      • Hardware
      • Software
      • Information
      • Data
      • Applications
      • Communications
      • People

Proper adherence to audit rules is necessary. A lack of compliance will impact your ability to do business.

In Closing, HIPAA Questions and Answers

HIPAA rules are designed to ensure that any entity that collects, maintains, or uses confidential patient information handles it appropriately. It may be time-consuming to work your way through this free HIPAA self-audit checklist. However, it is essential that you cover every single aspect of it. Your compliance is mandated by law and is also the right thing to do to ensure that patients can trust you with their personal health information.

One thing to understand is that it is an incredible challenge to try to do this by yourself. You need professional help such as a HIPAA technology consultant. Gone are the days you can have a server in your closet at the office, along with your office supplies. The cleaning personnel seeing a print out of a patient’s file constitutes a ‘disclosable’ event.

Screen servers, privacy screens, and professionally-managed technology solutions are a must. Just because you use a SAS-based MR (Medical Records) solution, does not mean you are no longer responsible for the privacy of that data. If they have lax security, it is still the providers’ responsibility to protect that data. Therefore the burden of due diligence is still on the provider.

Phoenix NAP’s HIPAA compliant hosting solutions have safeguards in place, as audited in its SOC2 certifications. We provide 100% uptime guarantees and compliance-ready platform that you can use to build secure healthcare infrastructure.

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Recent Ransomware Attacks Could be HIPAA Violations

Recent Ransomware Attacks Could be HIPAA Violations | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it
By now, you may have heard about the massive ransomware attack that has struck over 150 countries, including The United States, over the past week.
 
If health care data taken hostage in a ransomware attack is unencrypted, it could constitute a HIPAA violation. Any electronic protected health information (ePHI) that is affected by a breach without proper encryption methods in place is very likely to be compromised in the event of a ransomware attack.
 
These recent attacks come out of a growing trend in malware incidents over the past year. OCR has released guidance about how to handle a ransomware incident in your health care practice. The federal government has stressed the importance of safeguarding your organization and protecting your confidential patient data.
 
 
If you’re interested in protecting your organization from a ransomware incident–and want education about how to prevent ransomware attacks from spawning HIPAA breaches and fines–attend the upcoming webinar.
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Legislation Changes and New HIPAA Regulations

Legislation Changes and New HIPAA Regulations | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

The policy of two out for every new regulation introduced means there are likely to be few, if any, new HIPAA regulations in 2018. However, that does not mean it will be all quiet on the HIPAA front. HHS’ Office for Civil Rights (OCR) director Roger Severino has indicated there are some HIPAA changes under consideration.

 

OCR is planning on removing some of the outdated and labor-intensive elements of HIPAA that provide little benefit to patients, although before HIPAA changes are made, OCR will seek feedback from healthcare industry stakeholders.

 

As with previous updates, OCR will submit notices of proposed rulemaking and will seek comment on the proposed changes. Those comments will be carefully considered before any HIPAA changes are made.

 

The full list of proposed changes to the HIPAA Privacy Rule have not been made public, although Severino did provide some insight into what can be expected in 2018 at a recent HIPAA summit in Virginia.

 

Severino explained there were three possible changes to HIPAA regulations in 2018, the first relates to enforcement of HIPAA Rules by OCR.

 

Since the introduction of the Enforcement Rule, OCR has had the power to financially penalize HIPAA covered entities that are discovered to have violated HIPAA Rules or not put sufficient effort into compliance. Since the incorporation of HITECH Act into HIPAA in 2009, OCR has been permitted to retain a proportion of the settlements and CMPs it collects through its enforcement actions. Those funds are used, in part, to cover the cost of future enforcement actions and to provide restitution to victims. To date, OCR has not done the latter.

 

OCR is considering requesting information on how a proportion of the settlements and civil monetary penalties it collects can be directed to the victims of healthcare data breaches and HIPAA violations.

 

One area of bureaucracy that OCR is considering changing is the requirement for covered entities to retain signed forms from patients confirming they have received a copy of the covered entity’s notice of privacy practices. In many cases, the forms are signed by patients who just want to see a doctor. The forms are not actually read.

 

One potential change is to remove the requirement to obtain and store signed forms and instead to inform patients of privacy practices via a notice in a prominent place within the covered entity’s facilities.

 

Severino also said OCR is considering changing HIPAA regulations in 2018 relating to good faith disclosures of PHI. OCR is considering formally clarifying that disclosing PHI in certain circumstances is permitted without first obtaining consent from patients – The sharing of PHI with family members and close friends when a patient is incapacitated or in cases of opioid drug abuse for instance.

 

While HIPAA does permit healthcare providers to disclose PHI when a patient is in imminent harm, further rulemaking is required to cover good faith disclosures.

 

While these HIPAA changes are being considered, it could take until 2019 before they are implemented.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
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