HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices
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HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices
HIPAA Compliance and HIPAA Risk management Articles, Tips and Updates for Medical Practices and Physicians
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Why Secure Communication for HIPAA Compliance is Not Enough

Why Secure Communication for HIPAA Compliance is Not Enough | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

When you spend a lot of time writing about HIPAA compliance and its importance for healthcare providers, you sometimes forget the bigger question: What does HIPAA compliant communicationmean for healthcare?

Yes, we know that HIPAA requires secure and encrypted clinical communication to ensure patient privacy. But is that where the argument starts and ends? Is patient privacy the only reason to embrace HIPAA compliant communication?

Turns out, there’s more to the riddle.

 

Why focus on secure email and secure mobile messaging

According to a 2015 study, healthcare employees use mobile messaging more frequently than voice calling for their business communication. 65 percent of healthcare respondents use email most frequently for business communication, followed by mobile messaging (22 percent) and voice calling (13 percent). The same study also reported that 91 percent of those interviewed use mobile messaging at least a few times per week.

Healthcare often uses mobile communication after receiving a pager alert. Unfortunately, pagers cause unnecessary friction to the process of patient care.

Pagers cost over $1.7 M per year in lost productivity. As such, it is important to find alternative to make healthcare communication processes as efficient and effective as possible.

Similarly, given the prominence of email and mobile communication in healthcare, it also makes sense to remove the friction that these communication cause in terms of efficiency.

If information cannot be easily exchanged through email due to HIPAA concerns or legacy pen-and-paper processes, then the workflow is bogged down.

Why is workflow important?

Efficient clinical workflow saves time, saves money, and saves lives. And in today’s industry, workflow can have a significant effect on reimbursement. As such, effective and efficient communication is key. Practices need to be choosy.

OnPage’s smartphone-based secure messaging tool and Paubox’s mobile friendly HIPAA secure email and forms are designed with secure communication in mind as well as improved workflow. OnPage is able to improve workflow as is Paubox.

And workflow is really where it’s at.

While HIPAA compliance is important to physicians, it is not as important as their patients. Physicians focus on seeing patients and improving patient lives.

Technology that improves practitioners’ efficiency and allow them to spend more time helping patients are meaningful.

How HIPAA secure messaging trumps workflow

As noted, pagers are a huge impediment to optimal workflow in hospitals.

Most paging systems utilize single-function pagers that only allow one-way communication, requiring recipients to disrupt workflow to respond to pages. Paging transmissions can also be intercepted, and the information presented on pager displays can be viewed by anyone in possession of the pager.

However, smartphone-based, HIPAA-compliant group messaging applications improve in-hospital communication. These applications save time as physicians and nurses do not need to receive messages on their pager and then respond via cellphone.

By only using cellphone based secure messaging applications, physicians and nurses have access to secure communication while providing the information security that paging and commercial cellular networks do not.

Additionally, secure messaging technologies enable persistent alerting that ensures messages aren’t dropped, missed or forgotten. By ensuring that messages are not lost, administrators do not need to waste time following up on sent messages.

How secure email and forms improve workflow

A doctor or practitioner must encrypt their emails when they communicate protected health information via email.

Unfortunately, most encrypted email providers use a portal to gate communication. Portals can make recipients take up to five extra steps just to view any messages. It also makes the experience of reading email on a mobile device cumbersome.

Not being able to send and receive emails quickly and easily can significantly bog down workflows.

When it comes to forms, online forms reduce the time patients spend in the office and make the process of patient engagement much more fluid.

Having web forms enables patients to enter their information online and include attachments such as photos or documents, then send in their forms directly to their healthcare provider’s inbox via a HIPAA compliant email provider like Paubox.

Electronic forms make archiving these documents much easier than their paper counterparts as well.

Conclusion

Overall, healthcare cannot ignore the importance of HIPAA compliance; however, healthcare technology also needs to focus on improving the workflow of physicians and practitioners.

As a healthcare provider or practitioner, you need to look for solutions that make communication more efficient.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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How to Assess Practice Risk to HIPAA and the HITECH Act?

How to Assess Practice Risk to HIPAA and the HITECH Act? | HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices | Scoop.it

Since President Obama signed the HITECH Act (Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act) in February 2009, the relationship between and influence of the Act on HIPAA (Health Information Portability and Accountability) has drawn physician and practice manager attention to effective risk assessment.

 

American Health Lawyers Association Recommendation

This group recommends that practice professionals approach risk assessment regarding HIPAA and HITEC as a component of an Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) program. ERM, used by public and private corporations around the globe, is an ongoing decision-making program. In the healthcare industry, the board of directors or executive administrators typically design, install and use their plan to assess and reduce risk of all areas of patient care, compliance and to maximize the return on investment.

The Association reminds executives and administrators that Section 6401 of the Affordable Care Act requires that medical providers establish a compliance program as a condition of enrollment in the coming affordable healthcare legislation.

 

Risk Assessment Parameters

The core fundamentals of risk assessment programs, common to most businesses, regardless of industry, are familiar to many veteran executives. Components include the following items.

  • Written policy and procedure manuals.
  • Designating a Compliance Officer and/or Compliance Committee.
  • Providing staff with thorough training and education.
  • Disciplinary standards that are clearly defined.
  • A workable monitoring and auditing program.
  • Written response plan to mitigate losses.

Your risk assessment and compliance program should be as specific as you can make it. While it is impossible to address every possible eventuality, noting every potential risk you can identify in your policy and procedure manuals helps your staff manage their daily responsibilities more efficiently—with less risk.

Have the Compliance Officer or Committee monitor staff to be sure they follow the procedures your program mandates. Spend the time to write a plan to respond to increased risks your Compliance Officer discovers. This encourages fast action by your Compliance Officer or Committee to lower losses and quickly solve perceived risk issues.

The CMS (Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services) Manual outlines the risk assessment compliance program guidelines, which emphasize the following issues.

  • Prevention, detection and correction of non-compliance conditions.
  • Identifying and reducing fraud, abuse and waste.

 

Evaluating Risk Involving HIPAA and the HITECH Act

Compliance program guidelines specify three assessments providers should conduct. These actions also fit ERM parameters and guidelines, along with being specified by the Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.).

  • Security Evaluation. This is required under the Security Rule section and applies to providers, business associates or partners and subcontractors alike. All must “perform periodic technical and nontechnical evaluations . . .” when responding to environmental or operational changes affecting the security of electronic health information protected by law.
  • Risk Assessment of Specific Items. This is required under Security Rule stated at 45 C.F.R. (Code of Federal Regulations), section 164.308(a)(a)(ii)(A). Highly technical, this requirement should be performed per NIST SP800-30, Revision 1 Guide for Conducting Risk Assessments.
  • Risk of Harm Assessment. A requirement of the Breach Notification Rules, the practice must address “the implications and notification requirements” that are part of its ERM program.

The bottom line is that physicians must complete these three assessments and design an overall ERM plan that addresses as many risk issues as they can identify for their specific practices. It is vital that all medical providers create an organizational risk assessment program that encourages long-term compliance with HIPAA, the HITECH Act and all other regulations that apply.

Designing an ERM plan, as described, makes assessing potential practice risk of and avoiding HIPAA, HITECH Act and other regulation violations become normal operating procedure instead of compliance or loss practice crises.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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